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Wood for a coop

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ok, so I think I've figured out what coop design I want to build, my question now is, can I use pressure treated lumber.  I know the old stuff had arsenic and other bad things in it, but the new stuff is supposed to be non-toxic.  So is the new pressure treated lumber safe for use in coop construction since I'm assuming the chickens will peck/scratch at it?

post #2 of 12
Surely only wood in ground needs to be treated, unless you aren't painting the exterior. And then, only the external cladding needs treating.

Any untreated wood you can use saves $$

I could be wrong, and look forward to others advice
Frances (Shaver), Elsie & Gladys (Barnevelders) and Bell'n'Ginger (Rhode Island Reds, we can't tell apart)
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Frances (Shaver), Elsie & Gladys (Barnevelders) and Bell'n'Ginger (Rhode Island Reds, we can't tell apart)
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post #3 of 12

I know there will be a lot of disagreement, but I use old railroad ties for the base.  Most of the creosole has long since leached out, they are heavy enough to secure, last a long time, are large enough to be difficult to dig under quickly and they aren't very expensive.

These aren't your Grandfather's chickens.

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These aren't your Grandfather's chickens.

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post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedNZ View Post

Surely only wood in ground needs to be treated, unless you aren't painting the exterior. And then, only the external cladding needs treating.
Any untreated wood you can use saves $$
I could be wrong, and look forward to others advice


My problem is that most of the spring my backyard is wet, so any lumber on the ground (ie base, stilts) needs to be treated.  I realize that non treated wood is cheaper, but what I spend extra on treated lumber should be offset by being able to use a cheaper varnish/paint.....right?



Quote:
Originally Posted by DCasper View Post

I know there will be a lot of disagreement, but I use old railroad ties for the base.  Most of the creosole has long since leached out, they are heavy enough to secure, last a long time, are large enough to be difficult to dig under quickly and they aren't very expensive.


Where do you get those?

 

post #5 of 12

I have used both in my coops and runs over the years.   When it comes to 2x4's and such,  treated is not much more expensive than non treated.  So i would go with treated (it just last longer)But if you are buying plywood or siding then get out your wallet for a big price difference.  I purchased untreated plywood.  Then i bought some exterior grade latex paint (found some oops paint at Lowes. $5 a gallon) and my coop should last a long time now.

Owner of Welsummers and Black Copper Marans

Married to the love of my life and father of two fine boys.

Member of Welsummer Club of North America

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Owner of Welsummers and Black Copper Marans

Married to the love of my life and father of two fine boys.

Member of Welsummer Club of North America

Member of MCCUSA

NPIP Certified #71-0664

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post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwalden View Post

I have used both in my coops and runs over the years.   When it comes to 2x4's and such,  treated is not much more expensive than non treated.  So i would go with treated (it just last longer)But if you are buying plywood or siding then get out your wallet for a big price difference.  I purchased untreated plywood.  Then i bought some exterior grade latex paint (found some oops paint at Lowes. $5 a gallon) and my coop should last a long time now.



Think you could get away w/ MDF for the walls etc, as long as you seal it with a good paint?  I guess a follow up would be, what kinds of paint/varnish are safe for the inside of the coop?

post #7 of 12

Here is a newsletter piece regarding the new wood which discusses the special fastener needs to deter structural failure The Poultry Engineering, Economics & Management Newsletter

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bnjrob View Post

Here is a newsletter piece regarding the new wood which discusses the special fastener needs to deter structural failure The Poultry Engineering, Economics & Management Newsletter



At this point pretty much all hardware sold for decks etc are the right type for the "new" lumber.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOfFour View Post



At this point pretty much all hardware sold for decks etc are the right type for the "new" lumber.


Yes, there are plenty of the correct type of hardware for treated wood available at the home centers where I live and sounds like where you live.  But that may not be the case for others and many times these are more expensive to buy than the usual stock fasteners. 

 

Most people seem to be trying to spend as little money as possible on their chicken structures, and they may choose the less expensive hardware because they don't realize that the treated wood can negatively react with the "regular" nails, screws, other metal hardware that is available out there. 

 

 

post #10 of 12

This is true.  If you use pressure treated wood, be sure to get the correct screws and nails for it.   It is not hard to find, and a person who works there can direct you to the correct hardware.

We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.

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We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.

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