New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Red chickens

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

It seems like there might only be one variety of red-feathered chicken approved by the APA and then named red.  Could that be?  Is the word red reserved only for Rhode Island Red when it comes to breeds and varieties that are approved by the APA?  (Redcap excluded because Redcap refers to comb, not feathers.)

 

 

 


It's hard to explain puns to kleptomaniacs because they always take things literally.

 

I laugh in the face of "Recommended Serving Size."  The bag is too big to eat just 14 corn chips.

 

A little bit of summer's what the whole year's all about.  ~John Mayer

Reply


It's hard to explain puns to kleptomaniacs because they always take things literally.

 

I laugh in the face of "Recommended Serving Size."  The bag is too big to eat just 14 corn chips.

 

A little bit of summer's what the whole year's all about.  ~John Mayer

Reply
post #2 of 10

Yes, RIRs are the only Standardized breed that are Red. I know what you're thinking, and no, New Hampshires are not red. They are Gold. 'NHR' is a very incorrect term.

 

Emily

post #3 of 10

Buckeyes are red, but the name does not have red in it. I think red cochins may also be recognized, but I think its only in bantam.

post #4 of 10

Ever heard of Buckeyes? There are also Red Leghorns, Red Sussex, ect. New Hampshire's are red not "gold". 

 

Buck Bird

post #5 of 10

I forgot about Buckeyes. I know about Red Leghorns but I didn't know they were standardized. And, New Hampshires do not carry any Red enhancers. The only genetic mutation they carry is Blacktail (Db/Db).

 

Emily

post #6 of 10

Red Sussex (You are saying a red fowl with "red" in the actual name, right?)

 


Edited by cgmccary - 3/27/12 at 7:08pm
post #7 of 10

Rhode Island Reds, Buckeyes, Red Sussex, Partridge Plymouth Rocks, Partridge Wyandottes, Brown Cochins, Red Naked Necks, Red Leghorns, Red Silkies, Red Araucanas are all red in a sense that they carry the mahogany gene which makes for the deep bloody red coloration. Most of the listed ones are APA recognized.

 

The term New Hampshire Red is actually a made-up one and actually not even the true breed name anyway. It's New Hampshire, no red in the name. smile.png

Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

Reply

Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

Reply
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgmccary View Post

Red Sussex (You are saying a red fowl with "red" in the actual name, right?)

 



Yes.  Exactly. "Red" in the actual name. Thank you!

 

I did manage to verify Red Sussex (1914) as being admitted to the APA standard as well as the Red Leghorn in 1929.

 

Red Cochins do not appear to have been admitted to the APA standard.  I can't verify their admission.

 

Buckeye Reds were admitted by the APA under that name (Buckeye Reds), but within just months or a few short years, the name was changed to Buckeye, which Nettie wrote about.  But they are not now called "Buckeye Red" by the APA, so they don't belong in this discussion.  The same goes for New Hampshires, of course.

 

Red Naked Neck admitted to APA standard in 1965.

 

While Red Silkies exist, I can't verify that they have been admitted to the APA standard.

 

But the following three chicken varieties are enough to go on:

 

Red Naked Neck

Red Sussex

Red Leghorn

All APA Standard varieties of chickens.  Good to know.

 

So, what this means is that a Red Chantecler and a Red Wyandotte, if presented for approval process, could possibly retain their respective names.

 

Thanks for the help, everybody!

 

 


It's hard to explain puns to kleptomaniacs because they always take things literally.

 

I laugh in the face of "Recommended Serving Size."  The bag is too big to eat just 14 corn chips.

 

A little bit of summer's what the whole year's all about.  ~John Mayer

Reply


It's hard to explain puns to kleptomaniacs because they always take things literally.

 

I laugh in the face of "Recommended Serving Size."  The bag is too big to eat just 14 corn chips.

 

A little bit of summer's what the whole year's all about.  ~John Mayer

Reply
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovely Emily View Post

I know what you're thinking


Hmmm. 

 


It's hard to explain puns to kleptomaniacs because they always take things literally.

 

I laugh in the face of "Recommended Serving Size."  The bag is too big to eat just 14 corn chips.

 

A little bit of summer's what the whole year's all about.  ~John Mayer

Reply


It's hard to explain puns to kleptomaniacs because they always take things literally.

 

I laugh in the face of "Recommended Serving Size."  The bag is too big to eat just 14 corn chips.

 

A little bit of summer's what the whole year's all about.  ~John Mayer

Reply
post #10 of 10

No. Brown Cochins. Not Red. There are breeds out there with the same mahogany carrying red color but a different name. Plus there's breeds who carry the mahogany red color but with a little extra thrown in, like Chanteclers, Partridge Wyandottes, Partridge Plymouth Rocks - All breeds like such but with the penciling from Partridge. They're admitted colors.

 

Red Silkies and Red Araucanas are not admitted colors, no. Although I believe Red Silkies are in the UK.

Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

Reply

Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Breeds, Genetics, & Showing