BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › FERMENTED FEEDS...anyone using them?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

FERMENTED FEEDS...anyone using them? - Page 752

post #7511 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beekissed View Post
 

Here's a pic of my current one when I built it.... the bar on the top is to prevent birds standing in the trough, dominating the food, and to help me when I move it...it's the largest trough I've made, so it's a little bulky and heavy for me to move around if needed...the handle on it really helps with this.  I'll never make another trough without one of these...and, no, it doesn't cause my birds to roost on it and poop in the trough as all my birds are too busy outdoors doing other things.  Now, if such a trough were in a coop and run situation, then birds may roost on that as a place to be.   This one is 5 or so ft. long...can't remember now but it looks in that area of length.  

 

 

 

OK, I'll just go with bare wood. the way they gobble this stuff up I rather doubt it will stay filled long enough either. I was just worried about moisture soaking into the wood, possible leading it to get moldy.

 

Re: your handle idea, yeah, I have something similar incorporated into my present trough, which is now too small, and found it also makes filling easier too as I can lift the entire trough and hold it while I pour in the goop without having to compete with a bunch of food-crazed chickens! I took it one step further though and made mine so the chickens couldn't stand on the handle either, and possibly poop in their feed. Chickens, I found, will do their thing where ever and when ever, regardless of the consequences! :sick

The 'roof' over the trough is slanted so they cannot stand on it's flat surface without sliding off,and it's also hinged so if they try and roost on the upper edge they get dumped! I have seen this idea working in action, which is mildly amusing, if rather slapstick, so I know it works. More to the point though after weeks of use it is still poop free.  

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

Reply

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

Reply
post #7512 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beekissed View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noreaster Egger View Post

Does anyone know which beneficial bacterial strains are most prevalent when just fermenting with feed and water? Bactillus subtilis fermented soy beans yield the Asian food natto that is extremely high in vitamin K2. I'm curious if adding a probiotic, with bacillus subtilis in it (I know sav-a-chick is one), would raise the K2 content of my fermented feed.

 

I'd say in order to get a specific bacillus growing and thriving in the mix, you may have to have one of those airlock lids to your bucket to keep out any wild yeasts.  Whatever is the strongest bacillus in the mix will likely be the most prevalent and in order to raise the content of K2 I'm guessing it would have to be pretty prevalent in the mix. 

Be warned, sealed fermentation = Boom!

 

Since this post is about vitamins, I'm thinking that perhaps I should add some scratch feed to the mix, or give them some separately in the evening wouldn't be a bad idea, that way they can get the extra carbs to keep warm at night? And would adding scratch to the mix make it less likely for the gasses to push the top layer of fermenting 'crumbles' out of the bucket? I'm getting rather tired of waking up and finding half their feed attempting to escape leaving a mess on the counter top!


Edited by FlyWheel - 12/15/16 at 5:25am

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

Reply

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

Reply
post #7513 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWheel View Post
 

OK, I'll just go with bare wood. the way they gobble this stuff up I rather doubt it will stay filled long enough either. I was just worried about moisture soaking into the wood, possible leading it to get moldy.

 

Re: your handle idea, yeah, I have something similar incorporated into my present trough, which is now too small, and found it also makes filling easier too as I can lift the entire trough and hold it while I pour in the goop without having to compete with a bunch of food-crazed chickens! I took it one step further though and made mine so the chickens couldn't stand on the handle either, and possibly poop in their feed. Chickens, I found, will do their thing where ever and when ever, regardless of the consequences! :sick

The 'roof' over the trough is slanted so they cannot stand on it's flat surface without sliding off,and it's also hinged so if they try and roost on the upper edge they get dumped! I have seen this idea working in action, which is mildly amusing, if rather slapstick, so I know it works. More to the point though after weeks of use it is still poop free.  

It would be great if you could get a video of the chickens getting 'dumped'.  That is hilarious!

Lisa   (one very special husband, 1 ornery cat, 2 Australorps, 6 EEs, 3 Speckled Sussexs,)

Have you heard the Good News?

Reply

Lisa   (one very special husband, 1 ornery cat, 2 Australorps, 6 EEs, 3 Speckled Sussexs,)

Have you heard the Good News?

Reply
post #7514 of 7983

I didn't do anything different, we raised some meat birds last year along with the layers , booted the meat birds out to free range with the layers and feed em the fermented feed we do and they grew just fine.We ferment 3 in 1 grains with just water spring and summer in 5 gallon bucket we backfill in, when it starts cooling off in the fall we add in a tsp of cayanne pepper, we do have to feed them regular flock raiser in the winter as cannot keep it from freezing but give them some warm oatmeal with cayanne pepper and garlic in the evenings. This is second year we have been doing this and flock is still as happy as can be and doing well. without added light or heat source

post #7515 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWheel View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beekissed View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noreaster Egger View Post

Does anyone know which beneficial bacterial strains are most prevalent when just fermenting with feed and water? Bactillus subtilis fermented soy beans yield the Asian food natto that is extremely high in vitamin K2. I'm curious if adding a probiotic, with bacillus subtilis in it (I know sav-a-chick is one), would raise the K2 content of my fermented feed.

 

I'd say in order to get a specific bacillus growing and thriving in the mix, you may have to have one of those airlock lids to your bucket to keep out any wild yeasts.  Whatever is the strongest bacillus in the mix will likely be the most prevalent and in order to raise the content of K2 I'm guessing it would have to be pretty prevalent in the mix. 

Be warned, sealed fermentation = Boom!

 

Since this post is about vitamins, I'm thinking that perhaps I should add some scratch feed to the mix, or give them some separately in the evening wouldn't be a bad idea, that way they can get the extra carbs to keep warm at night? And would adding scratch to the mix make it less likely for the gasses to push the top layer of fermenting 'crumbles' out of the bucket? I'm getting rather tired of waking up and finding half their feed attempting to escape leaving a mess on the counter top!

I think if you do a nutritional comparison, you'll find that the calorie content of your prepared feed is actually higher than the scratch.  I'm thinking the whole theory about scratch/corn "warming the chickens up" is simply an old wives tale.  I've done a search and can find no documented literature/studies that support the theory.  I'd love to open this issue up to discussion without turning it into a he said she said argument.  If any one can provide documented studies/nutritional analysis that supports the "myth" I'd love to see them. However, when I've added scratch to my feed, I find that it ferments with even more vigor.  I think the scratch inoculates the mix with more bacteria and fungi.  Simply don't put as much feed into your bucket.  


Edited by lazy gardener - 12/15/16 at 6:28am

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

Reply

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

Reply
post #7516 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImportTheBest View Post

So in that link with the FAQ on FF it basically says if you have chloramines in your tap water to not bother with FF unless you can filter it out. I looked up what is needed to filter out the chloramines and well, that's just not going to happen. sad.png

They're going to be getting the city water for drinking, that's just the way it is going to have to be. Is it really pointless trying to FF with the city water? Will it 100% not work? I was really excited to FF with my new birds and the meat birds to keep poop smells down and keep my ladies healthy and happy.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by redsix View Post
 


I guess the thinking is that the chlorine will kill the bacteria that causes the fermenting process.  I think if you leave the water in an open container for 24 hours, most of the chlorine will go away.  You could always catch rain water.

Sorry if someone already replied...

 

Chlorine and chloromines are not the same thing. Chlorine will evaporate and chloromines will not.

 

Many people ferment with city water. And not all water districts use chloromine. You can check your water quality report or just call them and ask. Some use chloromines only seasonally.

 

I say ferment that feed! :D I think it will work, just might take a couple extra days to reach the correct state.

post #7517 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by carol goins View Post

I have been using femented food for past year! My chickens love it. I use 1 1/2 cups of their feed1 cup of scratch and filtered water to top , stir add more wateras needed in large jar. Cover with lid and stir couple times a day, ready in 3 days. Keep 2. Jars going at all times. Also keep lentils sprouts going in jars also!

Hi, welcome to BYC! :frow

 

I'm surprised that feeding out that much scratch you aren't having issues with health, laying, and feather picking.... :hu

 

What protein % is your feed?

post #7518 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazedCowgirl View Post
 

Sorry if my questions have already been answered but I'd like some further info and help when it comes to fermented feeds. 

 

I currently have 5 laying hens and 12 new chicks. Currently hens are on layer pellets and chick are on chick crumbles. I'd love to start giving everyone fermented feed but I've seen and heard mixed "reviews" on it. I still have a few questions that I haven't gotten clear answers on. 

 

1) Can I feed chicks (less then a week old) fermented feed? 

 

2) Do you have to use special feeders or can I just add it into their gravity feeder they have now.

 

3) Can I make fermented feed out of store bought chick starter or layer pellets or is it best to make it out of plain grains? 

 

I've received some pretty harsh feedback from other chicken people when I mention fermented feeds and it sounds like everyone here has some great knowledge to share! 

Great info from @lazy gardener

 

I want to add that I have a mixed age and gender flock and use a flock raiser that has 20% protein and 1% calcium. It is OK to feed the layers unmedicated starter as long as you provide oyster shell on the side, but under no conditions would I feed chicks layer. High calcium diets have been shown to stunt growth and can cause kidney issues if fed long term to non layers including chicks, roosters, and molting hens. Plus layer has such a low protein content it doesn't quite support growing birds and feathers are made of protein.

post #7519 of 7983
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post
 

I think if you do a nutritional comparison, you'll find that the calorie content of your prepared feed is actually higher than the scratch.  I'm thinking the whole theory about scratch/corn "warming the chickens up" is simply an old wives tale.  I've done a search and can find no documented literature/studies that support the theory.  I'd love to open this issue up to discussion without turning it into a he said she said argument.  If any one can provide documented studies/nutritional analysis that supports the "myth" I'd love to see them. However, when I've added scratch to my feed, I find that it ferments with even more vigor.  I think the scratch inoculates the mix with more bacteria and fungi.  Simply don't put as much feed into your bucket.  

I too would like to know if scratch "warms them up". I am not fermenting their scratch, but on very cold nights the six hens get about a cup just before bed. The idea of course is that it fills their crops and thus increases their metabolism due to digestive action overnight. That may be the  case, but would't regular FF do the same? Perhaps people are feeding scratch (like me) just before bed because we KNOW the chickens will eat it :rolleyes:.

 

That being said, the scratch I have is only 8% protein. Therefore, to mitigate protein loss, I supplement with live mealworms (about half a cup) per day. That was one of the smarter things I did, was start a mealworm farm for them.

 

Finally, being new to this thread, another question...I am adding a little alfalfa to their FF every day...being as it is winter and foraging for greens is non-existent. I am fermenting the alfalfa (from a big bag of alfalfa cubes) separately from the FF. What do you think?

post #7520 of 7983
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Thanks Bee....can see it fine....patina as in 'weathered' wood, which shows...aged, but no rotting/damage.

Did you use any special screws/nails?

This should convince @FlyWheel to keep it simple and not to worry, just screw some wood together.

 

No special screws....just your basic wood screws. 

 
Matthew 10:32-33 - Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven.  But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJdx9BtTob4

Reply
 
Matthew 10:32-33 - Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven.  But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJdx9BtTob4

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Feeding & Watering Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › FERMENTED FEEDS...anyone using them?