BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › Chicken scratch vs. chicken feed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chicken scratch vs. chicken feed - Page 2

post #11 of 27

THere are many ways to approach this. Im convinced that feed should ideally be given this way:

A hopper of scratch/cracked grain
A hopper of all purpose feed
A hopper of oyster shell
All the green feeds they can eat.

Chickens have definite appetites for all of these, each at differing times. This does not include what they pick up while foraging.

To simplify things you can give all your adult birds:

A good layer feed - males included.
Add to this the green feeds.
Scratch/cracked grain and table scraps as available.

I feed a locally milled grower feed (this one is 17-18% protein), oyster shell, greens as available and scraps. Mine are yarded and allowed to roam at will within their paddock.

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

Reply

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

Reply
post #12 of 27

* Besides being far too short of protein for good development, scratch has next to no calcium for layers, and really not enough nutrients if you hope to hatch healthy chicks.  I think it is best used to encourage  activity in your birds, and as a training reward.  JMO.

--d.k ; East Coast, FL. 16Dec2010 -- 1 White Hen, the "Miss Perky" + 2 rowdy, rapidly growing kittens, namely"Yeti Bear", and "Sissy" (aka "Frickles").
RIP My Sweet,  Very Greatly Missed "Miss Chook";  I miss you every day, Momma's Little Girl....
and  "Miss Ginger", family dog,  friend,  protector against all threats,  whether real and imagined, for 12 years.
Reply
--d.k ; East Coast, FL. 16Dec2010 -- 1 White Hen, the "Miss Perky" + 2 rowdy, rapidly growing kittens, namely"Yeti Bear", and "Sissy" (aka "Frickles").
RIP My Sweet,  Very Greatly Missed "Miss Chook";  I miss you every day, Momma's Little Girl....
and  "Miss Ginger", family dog,  friend,  protector against all threats,  whether real and imagined, for 12 years.
Reply
post #13 of 27

Thank you.. and I am still so confused!

I guess what I need to ask is.. What should I feed my rooster?

post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by fullhouse 

50lbs.  Corn causes the chicken to heat up.  Great for cold winter nights!


This is NOT TRUE!!!!!!!!!!

High fiber products are the ingredients that produce heat.  The starches in corn are very digestible and have a much lower Heat Increment than many other ingredients available for use in monogastric feeds.

Jim

Husband, Father, Livestock Nutritionist, Farmer
 

Reply

Husband, Father, Livestock Nutritionist, Farmer
 

Reply
post #15 of 27

I didn't see your post elderoo...  I commented on page 1.. didn't realize it had gone to 2 pages.

post #16 of 27

The only other compounding issue, FisherM, is feeding chicks.
They cannot have layer feed, as it contains elevated calcium levels for making egg shells. This calcium is bad for chicks. For those little guys, you want a grower ration, free of the calcium excess.

I just make it simpler and give a grower ration to everybody. The grower I have here is locally milled and is 17-18% protein. I keep oyster shell grit in a separate feeder that the chicks can't get to, so the hens can help themselves to it.

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

Reply

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

Reply
post #17 of 27

Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay :

Quote:
Originally Posted by fullhouse 

50lbs.  Corn causes the chicken to heat up.  Great for cold winter nights!


This is NOT TRUE!!!!!!!!!!

High fiber products are the ingredients that produce heat.  The starches in corn are very digestible and have a much lower Heat Increment than many other ingredients available for use in monogastric feeds.

Jim


If it's not true than it's got to be the best perpetuated feed myth here.

Andrea
Reply
Andrea
Reply
post #18 of 27

I buy and give my hens wild bird seed too.    Is this ok in summer months?   I've cut back on the corn for the warmer months.

Fondly called the the crazy lady neighbor with- 1 Hubby, 3 children, 2 Springer Spaniels, 1 crazy cat, 1 Austrolorp, 1 Deleware, 1 Barred Rock, 1 guinea pig, 1 Arab/QH gelding, 1 Spotted Draft mare, and a tank full of fish...am I forgetting anything??
Reply
Fondly called the the crazy lady neighbor with- 1 Hubby, 3 children, 2 Springer Spaniels, 1 crazy cat, 1 Austrolorp, 1 Deleware, 1 Barred Rock, 1 guinea pig, 1 Arab/QH gelding, 1 Spotted Draft mare, and a tank full of fish...am I forgetting anything??
Reply
post #19 of 27

Glad to hear that they can all eat grower feed.
I just went out and fed everyone their separate foods.

Now I need to get educated more about ducks.  Mine are 9 week old Pekins.  They are eating the same as the chicks now.

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by fullhouse 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anny 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fullhouse 

Feed here is about $13 for starter/grower, $12 for layer, and $10 for scratch.  Scratch is a treat.


What size bags are those prices for???

thanks!


Also why shouldn't scratch be fed in hot weather?


50lbs.  Corn causes the chicken to heat up.  Great for cold winter nights!


Fullhouse is right..........its all carbs and the body has too work too hard to break it down, which heats up the body and many people lose birds in the hot summer because they are un-aware of it and feed scratch. But in winter they need the extra warmth so keep it handy.

"Sometimes when we expect the worst, we forget to Hope for the Best"
Reply
"Sometimes when we expect the worst, we forget to Hope for the Best"
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Feeding & Watering Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › Chicken scratch vs. chicken feed