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Do all roosters attack people, or just mine?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I've read through a few different approaches, but I have a feeling my rooster is just a jerk.  We probably shouldn't have named him "Friendly".

 

1) he is a Ameraucana (not EE) X Marans, he is SOOO pretty.  We have had him since about 4 weeks old, and purchased 6 chicks out of a lady's hatch.

 

2) I am generally a quiet kind of girl.  When he crows at me (not just near), I tend to ignore him.  When he has flown at me in the past, I do what I can to keep him from hurting me (he flies at my face generally), but I'm not really a "grab and carry" kind of person.  His approaches over the last 2 weeks are getting more bold.

 

Last straw....

Today he crowed at me, and I told him to go away. Then he ran up behind me while I was adding water and jumped on my back. I turned around to shoo him away, and he flew at my face again - so I hit him with the feed canister (like the kind you get Christmas cookies in).  He took a step back and did it again and again until I got the rake and nailed him with it.  Then he started crowing at me again and wouldn't let me get the eggs out of the coop (he launched at me each time I came around to that side).  Now I have 6-7 eggs that are just sitting outside.

 

I had to kill my Marans rooster in February because he went after my 4yo and broke skin several places on her arms and legs (yes, through winter clothing).  Now my children don't go anywhere near the chickens, and it's really a shame because I want them to be part pet.  I kept Friendly in spite of his behavior because he is a beautiful blue wheaten, I mean REALLY beautiful.  But, to be honest, I'm actually a little scared of him now.

 

SOOO, are all roosters like this?  I would really like to have a rooster so I can hatch out chicks a few times a year.  I've hatched out 2 groups so far and LOVE it.

THanks,

Heather

 

I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

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I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

Reply
post #2 of 15

You gotta make dumplings out of him. I have seen the mildest mannered breeds be mean like EEs and Buff Orphintons.

 

Don't give up on having a roo though. You can usually find someone with more Roos than they need and mild mannered to boot.

Too many chickens to list!

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Too many chickens to list!

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post #3 of 15

Another idea since you have small children is just to find someone with a Roo that is your breed, and just carry your hens over for a 1 week stand, when you're ready to hatch out some eggs. Fertilization is good for a couple weeks. Hens are equipped with storage capabilities to ensure survival of the species.

Too many chickens to list!

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Too many chickens to list!

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post #4 of 15

Normally I'd say that you could try working with him, sometimes they go thru this "teenager" stage where they are a real PITA but they settle down with age and a little training.  BUT since you have small children who want to be involved with the chickens I'd either get rid of him or keep him penned up.  It's just not worth the risk IMHO.  Especially with a bird that is leaping clear up on your back, he's going to go right for a childs face.

 

 

 

 

wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

THanks so much for the replies, I was kind of figuring I would need to end his free ranging days.  I did try locking them up, and he (or something) ripped the wire off one side of the run.  I used 1/2 hardware cloth, but I only stapled it on that side.

 

I am in the process of building a much larger coop that can be accessed from the garden (during winter months) or a run (during growing season), so I can't really keep him "penned up" - I tried the dual coop thing this past winter, and it was ultimately more work than I want to deal with.

 

THanks again, now - does anyone have a suggestion for a really docile rooster that comes in blue or lavender? ;)

I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

Reply

I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

Reply
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

Oh, I have heard that chickens can lay fertilized eggs for 10 days after a mating.  Does that mean I can collect eggs for 10 days after I kill him and hatch out a clutch? Is that sort of a guaranteed thing? Every egg we have ever gotten off our hens has been fertile, but I don't know how often they mate.

 

My daughter's preschool class wants to set eggs on May 1st, and I'm the only parent that currently has a rooster.  I guess I could keep him around for another 2 weeks to get the eggs for free (I was thinking I would have to buy hatching eggs, and I don't really want to).

 

thanks

heather

I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

Reply

I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

Reply
post #7 of 15

I've only had one rooster who was respectful of my space.  He was a game rooster used for a purpose we are not allowed to discuss on this forum.  I got him because I was asked to suture him.  He survived and I refused to give him back.  Since he belonged to in-laws, I was allowed to keep him.  As vicious as this rooster was to another bird, he squatted when I reached for him.  He had been handled extensively for one reason only, and his entire line was bred for one purpose only for many,many generations.  And it wasn't to attack humans, so he was tolerant of human interaction.  So, I guess one can deduce human aggression can be bred out of chickens.

 

Meanwhile we have to handle aggressive roosters.  While I will tolerate a rooster who is protective of his hens,  I cull roosters who display the behavior you describe.  Owning backyard chickens is supposed to be fun.  And when small children are involved, I recommend NO roosters at all.  Docile roosters are rare and there is no reason to risk a child's safety.

 

Some roosters can learn how to behave.  Stan will occasionally think about challenging me and I quickly change his mind by raising my arms and looking as predatory as I can. If he calls my bluff, I'll snatch him and give him a free flying lesson.  He usually screams like a girl and behaves himself.  He is extremely respectful of my handy chicken grabber and will squat when I touch his back with it.  

 

Chicken owners must remember flock dynamics change by the minute.  Since we don't stay with the flock 24 hours a day, sometimes we must remind the rooster we are the flock master.   But when a rooster is insistent with his attacks he is culled from the gene pool. 

Married to the old dude, 0 human kids, 2 horses, 4 cockatiels, 2 parakeets,  1 Blue Front Amazon, 1 Yellow Head Amazon,  1 eccentric peacock, 1 gsd, 1 pet terrapin, 1 Blue Copper Maran rooster, and 13 world famous Jersey Giants!

 

 

Stan the Man will be missed.

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Married to the old dude, 0 human kids, 2 horses, 4 cockatiels, 2 parakeets,  1 Blue Front Amazon, 1 Yellow Head Amazon,  1 eccentric peacock, 1 gsd, 1 pet terrapin, 1 Blue Copper Maran rooster, and 13 world famous Jersey Giants!

 

 

Stan the Man will be missed.

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post #8 of 15

Human aggression tendencies is a capital offense for us.  There are so many good roosters in the world, I have no patience and no time for a nasty one.  Anyhow, that's that regarding roosters.  

 

 

Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

thanks so much.  I really hate killing anything, hell, I would still be a vegetarian if my husband was willing ;)  Fortunately, I can be a mean mama bear, so Friendly the naughty rooster will be getting a name change next week (Dinner).  My last kill didn't go as smoothly as the youtube video, but I think it shouldn't be as horrible.

 

I am in the process of "creating" my perfect chicken - heavy, good layer, cold hardy, and NICE.  So I guess this guy wouldn't be a good choice anyway.  It's just such a shame 'cause he is so pretty ;)  (maybe that's why he's a jerk, because I keep calling him pretty ;)  )

 

Thanks,

Heather

 

I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

Reply

I have 4 chickens, I mean 12, OK fine - 20 wait 35 +/- depending on the season. Working toward a smallish coronation orpington with my small flock.

I also have Cayuga ducks

Reply
post #10 of 15

Based on a your requests for a friendly breed in a lavender color, and larger, cold-hardy bird...I have a Coronation Sussex rooster from Greenfire Farms (see my avatar). They are noted for being a docile breed and I can attest that at least this one guy certainly is. Very friendly...likes to come over and see what's going on. Not too dominant/protective--some of the hens still boss him around.

 

I have young kids and he's never threatened them. If anything he's a bit of a scaredy cat--he's even a bit intimidated by the rabbits. 

 

 

 


Edited by Daisy8s - 4/11/12 at 3:31pm

Backyard farming with my flock of super talented manure composters and bug hunters.

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Backyard farming with my flock of super talented manure composters and bug hunters.

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