BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Ducks › Growing your own duck food, and which breed would be best?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Growing your own duck food, and which breed would be best? - Page 3

post #21 of 28
I'm not sure what you're looking for by way of suggestions... Rouens have the production (hatchery) or the exhibition (meat) varieties. I have the exhibition. She forages well. She's big, surprisingly quick for her shape, friendly, and very camofloged (sp). My pekin (I had two of them but lost one to a 2 legged predator about a month ago) lived the first 3 years of her life never penned or housed. Hawks and owls are very prevalent around here, including great horned owls. Those two lived on an acre free ranged all the time until just this year. If you are deciding against Pekins simply because of hawks and them being easily seen from the sky I would personally out them back on your list. They may be easy to see, but they are BIG and not easily carried off by by hawks, coopers included. Pekins are amazing layers and big for meat.

I can't give you any info on broodyness of rouens since mine isn't even a year yet, she's in her first laying season but giveaway me about 5 eggs a week. My Pekins have always gone broody and my girl has layed every day since coming out of her molt last October. She keeps trying to hide her nest to hatch, but I know her tricks.

Why are you concerned about minimal bagged feed for supplemental use?

1 husband, 1 son, 1 daughter, 1 cat, 3 dogs, 6 ducks, 7 turkeys, too many chickens of all ages and stages, and bunches of fish... Do you wonder why I'm nutts?

Reply

1 husband, 1 son, 1 daughter, 1 cat, 3 dogs, 6 ducks, 7 turkeys, too many chickens of all ages and stages, and bunches of fish... Do you wonder why I'm nutts?

Reply
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 

Do you know if exhibition rouens are just as easily fertilized as other duck breeds?  I'm looking to, eventually, go completely off bagged feed.

post #23 of 28
The problem with the rouens and breeding is the deep keel. I know that may play a role un the fertility of eggs since it may get in the way during mounting. I'm not an expert, by any stretch, so who knows. The breeder I got her from didn't seem to have an issue, but he has the knowledge and experience I don't. He bred for showing them, and for that the deeper the keel the better, as I understand it. My drake is a cayuga, so I don't have problems with eggs not being fertile.

Eta: a handy visual of the actual difference in shape.
http://www.feathersite.com/Poultry/Ducks/Rouens/BRKRouens.html
Edited by nickie - 5/1/12 at 5:53pm

1 husband, 1 son, 1 daughter, 1 cat, 3 dogs, 6 ducks, 7 turkeys, too many chickens of all ages and stages, and bunches of fish... Do you wonder why I'm nutts?

Reply

1 husband, 1 son, 1 daughter, 1 cat, 3 dogs, 6 ducks, 7 turkeys, too many chickens of all ages and stages, and bunches of fish... Do you wonder why I'm nutts?

Reply
post #24 of 28

OP, 

I'm not sure if you've ever eaten much duck, but some breeds taste differently, in my experience rouen had a much more gamey flavor and that may be a pro or a con depending on your tastes. 

 

In your situation I'd lean toward the large appleyards-- they dress out well, they forage well, and they lay fairly well too. You can't ask for much more of a homsteading breed and I think the breed follows your way of thinking.

 

Vermincomposting is a great idea! Can't a person raise worms very efficiently in barrels?

Icelandic Viking Hens in Arizona? Horse-feathers! (Also goats, Silver Fox Rabbits, & Chinese geese.) Wishlist? Penedesencas!
Reply
Icelandic Viking Hens in Arizona? Horse-feathers! (Also goats, Silver Fox Rabbits, & Chinese geese.) Wishlist? Penedesencas!
Reply
post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 

Wow great visuals Nickie, thank you! 

 

Dusky I have never had duck before.  Everyone I talk to who've had duck love it, including my father and sister.  I've heard that some breeds taste different, but I've pretty much only heard muscovy vs. other breeds, and that the saxony is less fatty.  I'll look into silver appleyards some more, thanks!

 

I suppose the smartest way to go about it would be to get a couple of each breed we're thinking about, and see which one we like best (both in personallity and in taste).

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by la dee da View Post

Do you know if exhibition rouens are just as easily fertilized as other duck breeds?  I'm looking to, eventually, go completely off bagged feed.

 

Then I hope you live somewhere with no winter and a serious year-round big problem.

 

Ducks have to eat something.  Notice that wild ducks fly to South America during our winter, so that they can have something to eat. They aren't flying because of the cold.  Ducks don't have issues with cold. But plants go dormant and bugs disappear in the winter time.

Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

Reply

Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

Reply
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 

I would only take them off commercial food when I can grow enough myself to feed them, even through winter.

post #28 of 28
I buy organic feed but I supplement it with home grown lettuce and Swiss chard, they've already dug up my garlic which wasn't meant for them so I've had to get raised beds. We give them peas, meal worms, watermelon, lettuce as they are fussy and don't seem to like much else
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ducks
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Ducks › Growing your own duck food, and which breed would be best?