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Introducing new rooster to existing flock

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hey all I just got a new bantam rooster that I'm trying to introduce into an existing flock and looking for advice on how to him from fighting with the roosters I have now. He will be the 4th rooster and 2 of them are fine with him but my frizzle roo and him fighting. I've got the new boy in a small cage by himself in the pen with the rest of them where he can see them and they can see him but even now the frizzle is jumping at that cage trying to get at him and vice versa. Anyone have any ideas on how to make them get along? As soon as I turned the new boy loose he tore off one of my frizzle boys points on his comb.
post #2 of 7

well u have to keep them in a wide open space till they get used to each other  then u can keep them in the same cage or run or coop but try cutting off their spurs and putting al little vinegar in their water it may help 

1 tolerant mother, 2 red sexlinks ,1 isa brown, 1 australorp, 1 light/speckled sussex,one baby minorca mix, one white mystery chick, one maybe production red chick, a confused male pekin duck and one mystery hen which is genetically predisposed to lay double yolkers

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1 tolerant mother, 2 red sexlinks ,1 isa brown, 1 australorp, 1 light/speckled sussex,one baby minorca mix, one white mystery chick, one maybe production red chick, a confused male pekin duck and one mystery hen which is genetically predisposed to lay double yolkers

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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Not to sound stupid but what will vinegar do?
post #4 of 7

I'd keep him caged, but among them for at least 1-2 weeks.  After that, continue to keep him caged most of the time, but start trying to some free range sessions with everyone loose.  Keep in mind that you're not going to be able to avoid fighting.  He's messing with the pecking order and now they ALL have to reorganize and find their places with this new guy.  If you don't have a good hen-to-roo proportion, even after the pecking order's settle, you will likely still see fighting.
 

post #5 of 7

apparently vinegar neutralises the smell of the oils on their feathers and helps i dunnp that wat i read on this website i tryed it with my flock and it worked 

put it int heir water 

 

1 tolerant mother, 2 red sexlinks ,1 isa brown, 1 australorp, 1 light/speckled sussex,one baby minorca mix, one white mystery chick, one maybe production red chick, a confused male pekin duck and one mystery hen which is genetically predisposed to lay double yolkers

Reply

1 tolerant mother, 2 red sexlinks ,1 isa brown, 1 australorp, 1 light/speckled sussex,one baby minorca mix, one white mystery chick, one maybe production red chick, a confused male pekin duck and one mystery hen which is genetically predisposed to lay double yolkers

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Well after about 3 days in a cage by himself where they could see each other but not get at one another I let him out and they have been getting along great.  He quickly figured out he was not the big man after all

post #7 of 7

Awesome!  It's impressive how the hens can and will put a roo in his place if they have the mind to.  A few days after full integration of our roo with our girls, our DOM (the smallest of our hens and easily 3lbs under the roo) went head-to-head with him after he bumped into her.  She whirled on him with a squawk, hackles up, reared back and pecked him HARD right under the eye.  He puffed up a little and started to rear back, but she nailed him twice more while he was just warming up and then jumped straight up with a flap and charged.  Three chest bumps later and he looked like he didn't know what the heck had just happened and she turned her back on him and pretended he didn't exist. gig.gif

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