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Chicken lays a live chick.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I am not sure where something like this goes, but it is very interesting. I figured lots of people here would find it interesting too. Sorry if someone has already posted this.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/17769677

 

 

post #2 of 7
The poor hen...

Breeding: Silkies, Barred Plymouth Rocks, Ameraucanas, Naked Necks, Buckeyes, Welsummers, Marans and Mottled Houdans. 

 

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Breeding: Silkies, Barred Plymouth Rocks, Ameraucanas, Naked Necks, Buckeyes, Welsummers, Marans and Mottled Houdans. 

 

Pictures by Les Farms are not to be used without written permission from me first, and never for any commercial gain. Thank you.

 

Visit our COOP Page! 

 

Raising CX Free Range ~ Poultry Sexing Tips ~ Raising Chickens Naturally 

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post #3 of 7

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by aoxa View Post

The poor hen...

 

X's 2. I wouldn't breed that baby in case this oddity is something that can be passed on. Sad.

"The world said to conform, the world said to settle for less, the world said to compromise and no one would know...so I made my own world." ~Bijan  (And filled it with chickens!!)  ~Me!

 

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"The world said to conform, the world said to settle for less, the world said to compromise and no one would know...so I made my own world." ~Bijan  (And filled it with chickens!!)  ~Me!

 

***Amateur thread killer. If I were paid, I'd be a Professional***

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post #4 of 7

As someone who has hatched eggs, I question this story.  Eggs need oxygen just as much as the next animal does, that is why the shell is permeable.  With no umbillical cord connected to mother to deliver oxygen (which mammals get), the chick would suffocate.

 

Not only that, but hens impacted with eggs don't generally die from 'wounds', but rather infection from having a foreign body wedged in there (which would have happened well before 21 days).  Newborn chicks are exhausted and soft when hatched, not something capable of tearing up anything after they are done fighting with the eggshell for hours on end.

"It's easy. You draw a red line on the ground, right? Then you wait for a chicken to come along. When he arrives, he puts his beak right on the line and he's hypnotized!"
Joey Santiago
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"It's easy. You draw a red line on the ground, right? Then you wait for a chicken to come along. When he arrives, he puts his beak right on the line and he's hypnotized!"
Joey Santiago
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post #5 of 7

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pele View Post

As someone who has hatched eggs, I question this story.  Eggs need oxygen just as much as the next animal does, that is why the shell is permeable.  With no umbillical cord connected to mother to deliver oxygen (which mammals get), the chick would suffocate.

 

Not only that, but hens impacted with eggs don't generally die from 'wounds', but rather infection from having a foreign body wedged in there (which would have happened well before 21 days).  Newborn chicks are exhausted and soft when hatched, not something capable of tearing up anything after they are done fighting with the eggshell for hours on end.

 

i am in general agreement with you about the need for oxy etc. and that the chick is too soft to inflict wounds, however i have read that if an egg breaks inside a hen, the egg shell will cause wounds that will kill the hen.

I live by the golden rule,  and I love my Brahma LF chickens
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I live by the golden rule,  and I love my Brahma LF chickens
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post #6 of 7

 

Quote:

The government veterinary officer in the area said he had never seen anything like it before.

PR Yapa, the chief veterinary officer of Welimada, where it took place, examined the hen's carcass.

He found that the fertilised egg had developed within the hen's reproductive system, but stayed inside the hen's body until it hatched.

A post-mortem conducted on the hen's body concluded that it died of internal wounds.

 

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/17769677

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pele View Post

As someone who has hatched eggs, I question this story.  Eggs need oxygen just as much as the next animal does, that is why the shell is permeable.  With no umbillical cord connected to mother to deliver oxygen (which mammals get), the chick would suffocate.

 

Not only that, but hens impacted with eggs don't generally die from 'wounds', but rather infection from having a foreign body wedged in there (which would have happened well before 21 days).  Newborn chicks are exhausted and soft when hatched, not something capable of tearing up anything after they are done fighting with the eggshell for hours on end.

 

Well, April Fools was a few weeks ago now .... so, are you suggesting the Chief Vet is ... mistaken? hu.gif

 

'Internal wounds' does not necessarily mean the chick attacked the hen internally in any way;   internal wounds could have been "wounds of some kind caused by shell, infection/bacteria, perhaps?   

 

No idea for sure, I'm not vetenary trained.

 

 

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post #7 of 7

I collect eggs each night so we don't have a broody working the nesting boxes.  Saturday night I collect eggs and all the boxes were empty.  On Sunday when I went to collect eggs, I found that one of our hens laid a chick.  There was no shell, just a naked chick curled up in a ball.  Judging by what I saw and found on the internet, the chick was probably 14 days into development.  Has anyone seen this, other than in the article?  I was aghast as I didn't know this was possible.

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