BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › Sumac Trees with Red Berries in Winter.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Sumac Trees with Red Berries in Winter.

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Seems as a small child I can remember my father going out in the fall of the year and picking Sumac berries to feed to the chickens.  Has anyone else heard of this being done?  We have these trees growing against the edge of our property down by a creek.  In the fall and winter when all else is dormant and bare you can see red berries growing from the trees.  The bright red berries look rather beautiful against a white snow background.  I've watched wild birds land and feed on the berries. I do not plan on feeding them to my flock. Just curious if anyone else has heard of this.

 

 

 

Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra)
It grows to a height of about 10 feet. It bears alternately arranged leaves with serrated edges, which change to a crimson hue when fall approaches. Smooth sumac produces small green clusters of flowers in spring, which later in the year give way to bright-red berries that last all through the colder months.

 

450px-SumacFruit.JPG

- New for 2013 - Breeding Icelandic Chickens -

 

- Member of The American Buckeye Club -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply

- New for 2013 - Breeding Icelandic Chickens -

 

- Member of The American Buckeye Club -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply
post #2 of 5

Staghorn sumac berries are good to eat. I planned on harvesting some this past fall for myself but, never got around to it. Native North Amreicans (and other cultures) have used sumac for cooking, teas and healing for "ever".

 

If I harvest some this year I will not feed them to my flock either. I will dry them to use as a seasoning in my cooking and to make sumac tea. It tastes lemony. (I did make some this past fall...yummy)

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigertrea View Post

Staghorn sumac berries are good to eat. I planned on harvesting some this past fall for myself but, never got around to it. Native North Amreicans (and other cultures) have used sumac for cooking, teas and healing for "ever".

 

If I harvest some this year I will not feed them to my flock either. I will dry them to use as a seasoning in my cooking and to make sumac tea. It tastes lemony. (I did make some this past fall...yummy)

Thinking WAY back, LOL I do remember my 'Cherokee" grandmother making a sort of lemon-aide from these wild berries. It was very yummy!  These are very evasive trees.  I have been trying to kill 'thin" them out for the past few years with little results.

- New for 2013 - Breeding Icelandic Chickens -

 

- Member of The American Buckeye Club -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply

- New for 2013 - Breeding Icelandic Chickens -

 

- Member of The American Buckeye Club -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Barn Farms View Post

Thinking WAY back, LOL I do remember my 'Cherokee" grandmother making a sort of lemon-aide from these wild berries. It was very yummy!  These are very evasive trees.  I have been trying to kill 'thin" them out for the past few years with little results.

We have so many of these shrub like trees, their roots are like spaghetti underground very difficult to eliminate.  

 

I notice the birds eat their red seed flower like clusters closer to the middle and end of winter.   Was also wondering if this type of sumac is safe for the chickens?

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

It's my understanding from information I have read online they are not poisonous to poultry. Our chickens are around the trees and fallen berries and do not pay them any attention.

- New for 2013 - Breeding Icelandic Chickens -

 

- Member of The American Buckeye Club -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply

- New for 2013 - Breeding Icelandic Chickens -

 

- Member of The American Buckeye Club -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Feeding & Watering Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › Sumac Trees with Red Berries in Winter.