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Questions about getting NPIP certified - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamatink7 View Post


Did you end up being able to get certified? I'm interested in it BUT in a few yrs, depending on how things go. I've heard it's a difficult and drawn out process but very much worth it.

This is a very old thread and don't believe the OP will see this. We certified the new flock early December. It's not a difficult or drawn out process. The hardest part for me was having anyone call back from my state. That was a months long process that if I persistently called every day could have shortened to a week probably. After that it's simple, person doing the testing will contact you to work out the day you both are available. Pullorum is what NPIP is all about. With Avian Flu many states added that which is the random mouth swab that is sent to a lab. Pullorum test is blood sample and quick chemical reaction for instant result. Other states add what ever test they want. NPIP though a national program is administered  by each state so slightly different for each. Some have fee, some free, some test all birds every year others all birds first year and random birds each year after, etc. Heck, there is one state I know of that has classes so poultry people can be certified to conduct their own tests. This of course makes far too much sense and costs the state next to nothing compared to multiple full time vertrenarian employees driving across the state everyday to conduct a test a high school kid could do with less than an hour of training so didn't catch on. 

 

The only way you'll know what Ohio does or requires is to contact:

 

OH

Jim Chakeres, Ohio Poultry Association, 5930 Sharon Woods Blvd., Columbus 43229. Phone: (614)882-6111; FAX: (614)882-9444. E-mail: jchakeres@ohiopoultry.org

Leslie Stewart, Ohio Poultry Association, 5930 Sharon Woods Blvd., Columbus 43229. Phone: (614)882-6111; FAX: (614)882-9444. E-mail: LStewart@ohiopoultry.org

 

Here are the various State contacts:

 

http://www.poultryimprovement.org/documents/OfficialStateAgencies3-11-2016.pdf

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Egghead_Jr View Post

This is a very old thread and don't believe the OP will see this. We certified the new flock early December. It's not a difficult or drawn out process. The hardest part for me was having anyone call back from my state. That was a months long process that if I persistently called every day could have shortened to a week probably. After that it's simple, person doing the testing will contact you to work out the day you both are available. Pullorum is what NPIP is all about. With Avian Flu many states added that which is the random mouth swab that is sent to a lab. Pullorum test is blood sample and quick chemical reaction for instant result. Other states add what ever test they want. NPIP though a national program is administered  by each state so slightly different for each. Some have fee, some free, some test all birds every year others all birds first year and random birds each year after, etc. Heck, there is one state I know of that has classes so poultry people can be certified to conduct their own tests. This of course makes far too much sense and costs the state next to nothing compared to multiple full time vertrenarian employees driving across the state everyday to conduct a test a high school kid could do with less than an hour of training so didn't catch on. 

The only way you'll know what Ohio does or requires is to contact:

OH
Jim Chakeres, Ohio Poultry Association, 5930 Sharon Woods Blvd., Columbus 43229. Phone: (614)882-6111; FAX: (614)882-9444. E-mail: jchakeres@ohiopoultry.org
Leslie Stewart, Ohio Poultry Association, 5930 Sharon Woods Blvd., Columbus 43229. Phone: (614)882-6111; FAX: (614)882-9444. E-mail: LStewart@ohiopoultry.org

Here are the various State contacts:

http://www.poultryimprovement.org/documents/OfficialStateAgencies3-11-2016.pdf
thank you. It's just a curiosity right now but yes, once I get the girls established, I will inquire about this. Will you have to get recertification each year or just when you add to the flock?

new chick mama of 26 chicks: 6 BA, 5 GC, 5 BO, 4 SLW, 3 EE, 3 GLW &

a bunch of 2 legged kiddos along with 2 dogs and 1 turtle

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new chick mama of 26 chicks: 6 BA, 5 GC, 5 BO, 4 SLW, 3 EE, 3 GLW &

a bunch of 2 legged kiddos along with 2 dogs and 1 turtle

Reply
post #13 of 17

To maintain the certification you must retest yearly. You can only add to your flock from NPIP sources. From others that tested flock or hatcheries which must test stock. The purpose of NPIP is to stop the spread of Pullorum which is a strain of salmonella. Back in the day before monitoring is was a serious threat that threatened America's chicken supply and one of the few disease/bacterial infections to transmit through eggs. To sell eggs or birds across state lines you must have a NPIP flock. If your never transporting across state lines there is no need whatsoever for NPIP. 

 

For some reason people think it guarantees healthy birds. It does not. It only gives a high assurance of Pullorum free birds and a means of tracking the source of a Pullorum outbreak. You must file paperwork to your state agency for birds and hatching eggs sold. It's a means to quickly contain an outbreak if there ever is one. As stated, Pullorum was a very serious threat back in the day hence the National Poultry Improvement Plan which has virtually eradicated it. 

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply
post #14 of 17
Thank you very much for your information. I believe my hatchery is certified, that means the chicks are?

new chick mama of 26 chicks: 6 BA, 5 GC, 5 BO, 4 SLW, 3 EE, 3 GLW &

a bunch of 2 legged kiddos along with 2 dogs and 1 turtle

Reply

new chick mama of 26 chicks: 6 BA, 5 GC, 5 BO, 4 SLW, 3 EE, 3 GLW &

a bunch of 2 legged kiddos along with 2 dogs and 1 turtle

Reply
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamatink7 View Post

Thank you very much for your information. I believe my hatchery is certified, that means the chicks are?
No because they are in a new environment, so when they are over 6 months, they would need to be tested again. That's at least what I was told
post #16 of 17

The chicks are certified from a hatchery but do need testing to stay certified. It varies by state as to age; some 5 months some 6 months. The thing is if you have an NPIP flock hatchery chicks are a source for certified birds to add to your flock. Other than that any birds or hatching eggs added to your flock must come from another NPIP flock. In essence once your certified your flock is limited quaranteed. As in not any bird can be added- MUST come from an NPIP source.

 

The 5 and 6 month age of testing is nothing to get hung up on. Once in a program your tested yearly and typically the same month each year. All birds over that age are part of the testing procedure whether it's a state that test all birds older than X months or random sample of all birds over that age yearly.


Edited by Egghead_Jr - 4/11/16 at 6:10am

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply
post #17 of 17

I keep putting off because (like having company over in the house) I always keep thinking I will get everything cleaned up around the farm.  Still has not happened :P  They probably do not care that my husband collects junk, but I would still like to not have a pile of stuff next to every building :P

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