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How to keep crows & blue jays away?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I have 6 EE hens who free range in the back yard all day. When I first got them a few months ago, I really appreciated the crows in my neighborhood because they kept the hawks away. But I've began noticing that the crows are now scaring my chickens away from their food and water sources and eating it all. And when I feed the chickens snacks I have to stand out there like a living scarecrow until they're done eating. There's also two blue jays who drive them crazy. They're not even afraid of me like the crows are. One blue jay lands on the grass to distract the chickens (they love chasing small birds) as the other one grabs the food that they've abandoned. Then they take turns. It's frustrating to watch. Poor chickens. :(  

 

Would adding a rooster to my flock help keep them away at all? Or maybe a fake owl?

BB gun?

Thank you!


Edited by Bellurd - 6/7/12 at 4:41pm

6 EEs, 1 blue pit, 2 rats, & 1 cat. 

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6 EEs, 1 blue pit, 2 rats, & 1 cat. 

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post #2 of 29
A roo would help.I cut out the food and bang a pan to scare the crows away. They no longer come to my yard,but alas the squirrels do.If needed a pellet gun with scope would take care of the issue quickly.Hopefully other methods will work before you need to resort to lethal options.I would get rid of them if nothing else worked


.
post #3 of 29

You might want to get a cat if you don't have one? I have, ok too many here, but they hang with the chickens all day long out in the yard. No bird, not even hawks, in their right minds land in my yard! I feed my free range birds inside the run in the evening when they come in. No food outside, no attraction for the crows and jays. Try feeding them in their run prior to letting them out for the day, and then again when they come in at night. They should have enough stuff to munch on all day long in the grass. Do it for a couple of weeks, and see if the crows and jays just don't move on..

"Live and learn from fools and from sages" ~ Aerosmith
Black & Blue Copper Marans, and one Wheaten ~ White, Partridge & BBS Silkies
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"Live and learn from fools and from sages" ~ Aerosmith
Black & Blue Copper Marans, and one Wheaten ~ White, Partridge & BBS Silkies
Member of:  ASBC

 

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post #4 of 29

BB gun (or any other type) would be illegal anyway.

 

"Migratory bird act"

 

 

 

Quote:
Specific provisions in the statute include a Federal prohibition to "pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill, attempt to take, capture or kill, possess, offer for sale, sell, offer to purchase, purchase, deliver for shipment, ship, cause to be shipped, deliver for transportation, transport, cause to be transported, carry, or cause to be carried by any means whatever, receive for shipment, transportation or carriage, or export, at any time, or in any manner, any migratory bird, included in the terms of this Convention . . . for the protection of migratory birds . . . or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird." (16 U.S.C. 703). This applies to birds included in international conventions between the U.S. and Great Britain, the U.S. and Mexico, the U.S. and Japan, and the U.S. and the Russia.

 

 

 

Quote:

Arrests/Search Warrants. To enforce the Act, authorized Department of Interior employees may:   without a warrant, arrest a person violating the Act in the employee's presence or view; execute a warrant or other process issued by an officer or court to enforce the Act; search any place with a warrant. All birds, parts, nests or eggs that are captured, killed, taken, offered or sold, bartered, purchased, shipped, transported, carried, imported, exported or possessed contrary to the Act will be seized and, upon conviction of the offender or upon court judgment, be forfeited to the U.S. and disposed of by the Secretary. § 706.

 

 

§ 707 · Violations and penalties; forfeitures

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, any person, association, partnership, or corporation who shall violate any provisions of said conventions or of this subchapter, or who shall violate or fail to comply with any regulation made pursuant to this subchapter shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not more than $15,000 or be imprisoned not more than six months, or both.
(b) Whoever, in violation of this subchapter, shall knowingly--
(1) take by any manner whatsoever any migratory bird with intent to sell, offer to sell, barter or offer to barter such bird, or
(2) sell, offer for sale, barter or offer to barter, any migratory bird shall be guilty of a felony and shall be fined not more than $2,000 or imprisoned not more than two years, or both.
(c) Whoever violates section 704(b)(2) of this title shall be fined under Title 18, imprisoned not more than 1 year, or both.
(d) All guns, traps, nets and other equipment, vessels, vehicles, and other means of transportation used by any person when engaged in pursuing, hunting, taking, trapping, ensnaring, capturing, killing, or attempting to take, capture, or kill any migratory bird in violation of this subchapter with the intent to offer for sale, or sell, or offer for barter, or barter such bird in violation of this subchapter shall be forfeited to the United States and may be seized and held pending the prosecution of any person arrested for violating this subchapter and upon conviction for such violation, such forfeiture shall be adjudicated as a penalty in addition to any other provided for violation of this subchapter. Such forfeited property shall be disposed of and accounted for by, and under the authority of, the Secretary of the Interior.

CREDIT(S)

(July 3, 1918, c. 128, § 6, 40 Stat. 756; June 20, 1936, c. 634, § 2, 49 Stat. 1556; Sept. 8, 1960, Pub.L. 86-732, 74 Stat. 866; Pub.L. 99-645, Title V, § 501, Nov. 10, 1986, 100 Stat. 3590; Pub.L. 105-312, Title I, § 103, Oct. 30, 1998, 112 Stat. 2956.)

 

 

 

 

yes even on your property, even if they are harming pets or livestock.

 

(and the blue jays here harass cats and run them off by diving on there heads)

 

Of course there's a chance you won't get caught, but hten again the fines are huge and come with federal jail time. 


Edited by FireTigeris - 6/9/12 at 11:57am

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post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 

I have a big tom cat named Spencer that rules the block but he never comes into my backyard since we have a dog. The dog is rarely outside and couldn't care less about cats but Spencer is still very cautious. I could try to feed them in their run but we get a lot of ants here. I've already had to move their tractor a few times because the ants started swarming in their roosting area. :(  I'm just going to keep scaring them away and hope they don't bug my little girls too much when I'm not here. 

 

Thank you guys! I really appreciate the advice <3

6 EEs, 1 blue pit, 2 rats, & 1 cat. 

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6 EEs, 1 blue pit, 2 rats, & 1 cat. 

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post #6 of 29

Sounds like you must be leaving the chicken feeder outside the coop in your yard?  Keep the chicken feed in the coop, out of sight of wild birds.  The chickens can return to the coop when they want a snack.


Edited by janinepeters - 6/9/12 at 5:25pm
post #7 of 29

Make sure the wild birds don't get the idea to go into the coop- I had that once- crows eat eggs...

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post #8 of 29

the blue jays you might just have to give then some sunflower seeds in another spot on your property. but the crows are another thing . i am not sure on your laws in your state but in michigan  crows are legal to shoot . but i would get a good roster first. 

post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mi chicken View Post

the blue jays you might just have to give then some sunflower seeds in another spot on your property. but the crows are another thing . i am not sure on your laws in your state but in michigan  crows are legal to shoot . but i would get a good roster first. 

 

 

Sorry this is a federal law, so that is untrue.

 

 

Quote:

Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 (MBTA), codified at 16 U.S.C. §§ 703712 (although §709 is omitted), is a United States federal law, at first enacted in 1916 in order to implement the convention for the protection of migratory birds between the United States and Great Britain(acting on behalf of Canada[1]). The statute makes it unlawful to pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill or sell birds listed therein ("migratory birds"). The statute does not discriminate between live or dead birds and also grants full protection to any bird parts including feathers, eggs and nests. Over 800 species are currently on the list.

Narrow exceptions to the act, known as the eagle feather law, are enacted in federal regulations (50 C.F.R. 22), which regulates the taking, possession, and transportation of bald eaglesgolden eagles, and their "parts, nests, and eggs" for "scientific, educational, and depredation control purposes; for the religious purposes of American Indian tribes; and to protect other interests in a particular locality." Enrolled members of federally recognized tribes may apply for an eagle permit for use in "bona fide tribal religious ceremonies."[2]

The Act was enacted in an era when many bird species were threatened by the commercial trade in birds and bird feathers. The Act was one of the first federal environmental laws (the Lacey Act had been enacted in 1900). The Act replaced the earlier Weeks-McLean Act (1913). Since 1918, similar conventions between the United States and four other nations have been made and incorporated into the MBTA: Mexico (1936), Japan (1972) and the Soviet Union (1976, now its successor state Russia). Some of these conventions stipulate protections not only for the birds themselves, but also for habitats and environs necessary for the birds' survival.

Impact on Private Property Owners

Migratory birds may seek respite within trees or on buildings considered private property. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 prohibits the removal of all listed species or their parts (feathers, eggs, nests, etc.) from such property. However, in extreme circumstances, a federal permit might be obtained for the relocation of listed species (in some states a state permit is required in addition to a federal permit). Pursuant to the spirit of the treaty, it is not trivial to obtain a permit; the applicant must meet a certain criteria as outlined in Title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, 21.27, Special Purpose Permits.[8]

The permit applicant is generally a contractor who specializes in wildlife relocation. When hiring a contractor to trap and relocate any animal from one's property, the private property owner is well advised to attain proof of such permits before any trapping activity begins, as trapping without the necessary paperwork is common in the United States.

Most wildlife management professionals consider relocation actions undue harm to the birds, particularly since relocated birds (being migratory) often return to the same property the next year. In the case of trapping and relocation, harm is brought on by or can result in:

  • Breaking, a term describing increased susceptibility to disease brought on by the stress of capture and relocation
  • Difficulty in establishing territory at the new location
  • Separation of family members and the stunting of juveniles' natural progression into adulthood

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Partial Listing of Covered Species

 


Edited by FireTigeris - 6/9/12 at 7:28pm

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post #10 of 29
Legal or not, I wouldn't hesitate to shoot either 1. That's me. We all have to make our own choices.
I've got Bielefelders, Rhodebars, Cream Legbars, Black Sex Links, and Buff Orpingtons.
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I've got Bielefelders, Rhodebars, Cream Legbars, Black Sex Links, and Buff Orpingtons.
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