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Chicken Slaughter - Page 4

post #31 of 39
I explained to everyone in the beginning that that was the way it worked. Extras are supper.
we always have eggs/chicks for sale- pm for details- check out our profile for our breeds and pictures  and check out our web site at www.adifferentchickfarm.com    We share our BYC together (Steve and Tiffany) we have 4 kids. For our wonderful life we give God the Glory because all things are possible through him!  
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we always have eggs/chicks for sale- pm for details- check out our profile for our breeds and pictures  and check out our web site at www.adifferentchickfarm.com    We share our BYC together (Steve and Tiffany) we have 4 kids. For our wonderful life we give God the Glory because all things are possible through him!  
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post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beour3rd View Post
 

 

then feed it to her ;]

 

haha

 

 

this may not be the best option but she'll see it's tasty!

 

Hannibal Lecter fan Beour3rd? :)  -- That is how I got her to start eating venison though!

post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sotabrew View Post
 

 

Hannibal Lecter fan Beour3rd? :)  -- That is how I got her to start eating venison though!

decent movie, great book. bad sequels

post #34 of 39

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post #35 of 39

Yikes! I just looked up the broom stick method. It's horrible and bothersome. Not easy or humane. I'll resort to the traditional hatchet method.

I haven't found a chicken guillotine anywhere. I will invent one this summer.

post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
 

Yikes! I just looked up the broom stick method. It's horrible and bothersome. Not easy or humane. I'll resort to the traditional hatchet method.

I haven't found a chicken guillotine anywhere. I will invent one this summer.


Hmm. Don't know where you 'looked it up' but the broomstick method I'm familiar with, if it's done right, is just as humane as decapitation (which it essentially is). Not crazy about it, but it's virtually instant death with "equipment" available anywhere, so it's better than some methods. Tho I actually prefer the "English method" (unless it's an old rooster with a very muscular neck--I don't have the strength for that) which is the same principle, but you use only your hands. Instant death, no mess, botch-proof if you learn it right.

 

But hey, whatever works best for you (and the chickens) is the best method! Good luck! :)


Edited by triplepurpose - 4/24/16 at 4:58pm
Chickens are the Swiss Army knife of farm animals
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Chickens are the Swiss Army knife of farm animals
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post #37 of 39

I looked it up on youtube and watched a few videos doing the broomstick method. I don't see myself doing that.

 

The only manufactured guillotine I could find is a real beaut, stainless steel, safe, easy, but it's very expensive. It's primary use is for poor lab rats, chickens and other small animals. :(  Neurologists from several different research centers concluded that decapitation is the most humane way because all nerves are severed. But this is coming from people who use lab animals, creepy.

 

For us backyard farmers, once we figure out how to contain the convulsing body of a decapitated chicken, it's not that bad. I don't want to let it flop in the dirt. Someone suggested wrapping a chicken in velcro-tape just before and after the ax comes down, making it a bit easier to handle. I'll post my results in about 10 weeks. 

post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
 

I looked it up on youtube and watched a few videos doing the broomstick method. I don't see myself doing that.

 

The only manufactured guillotine I could find is a real beaut, stainless steel, safe, easy, but it's very expensive. It's primary use is for poor lab rats, chickens and other small animals. :(  Neurologists from several different research centers concluded that decapitation is the most humane way because all nerves are severed. But this is coming from people who use lab animals, creepy.

 

For us backyard farmers, once we figure out how to contain the convulsing body of a decapitated chicken, it's not that bad. I don't want to let it flop in the dirt. Someone suggested wrapping a chicken in velcro-tape just before and after the ax comes down, making it a bit easier to handle. I'll post my results in about 10 weeks. 


 I can believe that decapitation is the most humane way to go. (That would be my choice if captured by cannibals and given one!) It's also what we here routinely use for dispatching ducks or big roosters. 

 

As for restraining your birds, what about just holding the feet and the wing tips? You should be able to do that with one hand, leaving the dominant hand free to swing the hatchet. Only takes a few seconds for the stronger convulsions to pass and you can set it down.

 

But the tape idea sounds cool too!

Chickens are the Swiss Army knife of farm animals
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Chickens are the Swiss Army knife of farm animals
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post #39 of 39

Sorry for reviving an old thread, but thought I could share some interesting views...

We have a very special way to slaughter an animal, and it's referred to a Schechitah.

I will explain how I do it with a chicken... a more modern way than most of the Jewish people I have corresponded with advised. But I am not a run of the mill Jew, I am bit strange.

1 razor sharp blade, I am talking sharp enough to cut through bone. Traditionally we use a special blade that costs big $$$, but I modified a small hunting blade for the job and spend three days sharpening it on lime stone. This same knife for me, is used in every step as it is so sharp and strong, I can literally cut a soda can open. A traditional Schechitah blade is only used for the kill, and is so fragile, that after a while you can throw it away. This is why I opted for a thicker stronger blade.

 

I also use a marble slab as it is easy to clean. I have a large basin for washing. The marble slab sits on my chest freezer and the sink is just to the side. The slab lives next to the freezer against the wall. I also have at hand a big bucket with lid. A bottle of bleach and some Kosher Coarse Salt. A plastic packet for the disposal of waste matter (guts etc). Oh, and some towelling. Lots of towelling, and safety glasses. And wear old clothes.


First I clean EVERYTHING with a strong bleach and water mix. You are going to eat this bird so it must be clean.
 

I hold the chicken a certain way, that exposes the throat. When cutting, try and cut between feathers, as it is easier and quicker. The slightest mistake here will result in the bird suffering, which renders the bird "unkosher" immeadiately. I say a certain prayer blessing and make a fast deep cut that goes right through the plumbing. The bird is held over the basin to let most of the blood drain. The heart beat stops pretty fast, but sometimes the bird will fight on for minutes. It can be heartbreaking, but I just remind myself that G-d gave me this bird for food. A deep basin helps minimise mess. I keep the tap running as I hate the smell of blood. I repeat the prayer blessing as the last of the blood is drained.

Once the bird is lifeless and the drain seems to be free of blood, I start to pluck. The wing feathers I save for my friend who makes dream catchers. The wing feathers are hard to get out, as they are the deepest. I find boiling hot water helps. I dip the wings in a bowl of boiling hot water and then a yank them out. The feathers seem to go funny when they dry, but my friend manages to save them. Once I have removed the wing feathers I then go to the rest of the bird. I start from the bum and basically peel the feathers off. All these feathers go in my plastic packet. I do not pluck the tail as those feather are not worth saving as they always seem damaged. And we do not eat that part of the bird so it just gets chopped off. I do not pluck the neck as I just skin it and cut off the neck meat for my domestic worker who says it's the second best part. She also takes the feet. I won't fight her for that part either.

So once the bird is plucked, it's time to gut. I start at the neck, though most people I know say they start at the bum. I cut the neck open and remove the throat and crop. In the bag it goes. I chop off the head, and in the bag it goes. I chop off the actual neck and in a plastic container it goes. Then I snap the legs at the joint, one clean slice per leg and the feet go to my domestic worker who soaks them in boiling water for 5 minutes to remove the skin. Then she puts it in her plastic container with the neck. She eats that.

Then I cut off the tail. Try not to cut open the anus, or it get's really messy. The tail goes into the plastic bag. Then I cut around the anus, and I squeeze the crap back down the intestine and tie a knot to keep it there.

Now I cut the bird down the center of the rib cage... it make it easier to remove the guts. Be careful when cutting to not cut into the guts... avoid the mess if you can. Open the bird up, snap the back of the book so to speak. I pick up all the guts cutting away between the guts and the rib cage when needed. Everything goes in the plastic bag. The bag is tied up and put in my freezer for garbage day. Do not put it in your garbage bag straight away, as it will make a nasty smell that will get your neighbours complaining.

I then wash the bird out. Then I soak the bird in the bucket for half and hour with fresh water. This get's the meat of the bird to be water logged which helps to flush out the blood. The Torah strictly forbids the consumption of blood, so the next few steps are important to remove the blood.

While soaking clean your work area so that is FREE of blood. Place your wet bird on the work area. Do not leave, especially if you have cats like I do. Let the bird air dry. It must be damp enough for the salt to stick but not so wet the salt disolves. Rub the bird all over with the coarse salt. Put the bird back in the bucket for one hour or so. Remove the bird and place it back on the CLEAN slab. Rinse the bucket and then rinse the bird. I then fill the bucket with water. I then wash and rinse the bird in the bucket THREE times.

The bird is then "koshered". It should be blood free. Prepare the bird either for cooking or for freezing.

Most people I know slaughter the birds at 40 days... I wait about 100 days after hatching. The birds weight almost 10 pounds when gutted. Well the ones I have do. One bird gives us food for almost one week. Problem is at that age, it doesn't fit in my oven, or microwave, so I often end up cutting it into smaller portions. However it does fit on my braai. (http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1148747/hello-my-name-is-karl)

Home fed chickens have much bigger and tastier breast meat... very juicy. I cook the bird in the skin, but we do not eat the skin. We just don't like the texture in our mouths.

So that's how we do it? I'll post some recipes sometime for some unique ways to cook chicken on the braai (BBQ). I'll even share some South African secrets, but shh, don't tell anyone.

 

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