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Welded Wire Fence- Pros and Cons? - Page 4

post #31 of 37

Thank you so much for the pictures and details about your gate.  We put half of the fencing up last weekend and will get the rest of the fencing up tomorrow then I will get the gates up during the week.  

 

One gate will be attached to a chain link fence post that we lined our t-post/welded wire fence up with just like you did with the existing wood fence-- it will be made with 2 by 4 with some fencing attached across it and now with your instructions I see how to attach it to the post using the screw eye over the male hinges and I like the idea of being able to lift the gate off completely for easier access with the wheel barrow.  The double ended clips to attach it to the welded wire is so much better than my plan to use a rope to tie and untie.  

 

The second gate is going to be between t-posts only and will only be used when I need to get the small tractor into the area so not often.  Until I come up with a better plan, I may just make a "gate" with the welded wire fence with one side of the welded wire in the gate area attached to the t-post and the other end of the welded wire loose.  I will use your idea of the double sided clips to keep it closed.

 

Many thanks for your help! 

post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by CreativeCowgirl View Post
 

I'm planning on fencing my new chicken yard with 5' tall welded wire fence. The holes are 2" x 4". What are the pros and cons of this type of fencing?

Why not explore other wire options like 1 X 2 inch welded wire.  An attack by a determined predator like a German Shepard with time on his hands can breach 2 X 4 wire by breaking a few of the welds.  In my opinion if you want to go 6 foot high the best option is 1 X 2 inch welded wire 3 feet high topped by 2 X 4 welded wire for a total of 7 feet tall.  However if you intend to keep fat fowl, a.k.a. duel purpose breeds only you or your 6 foot + hubby will ever be able to use more than about the bottom 3 feet of the pen.  Also a tall pen will pose health problems for heavy fowl in the form of bumble foot, or other joint problems arising out of an 8 -12 pound bird landing on a skeletal structure designed for only a 4 to 5 pound chicken.  The only alternative I see is to install an elevator and then train your birds to ride it.

Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post
 

Why not explore other wire options like 1 X 2 inch welded wire.  An attack by a determined predator like a German Shepard with time on his hands can breach 2 X 4 wire by breaking a few of the welds.  In my opinion if you want to go 6 foot high the best option is 1 X 2 inch welded wire 3 feet high topped by 2 X 4 welded wire for a total of 7 feet tall.  However if you intend to keep fat fowl, a.k.a. duel purpose breeds only you or your 6 foot + hubby will ever be able to use more than about the bottom 3 feet of the pen.  Also a tall pen will pose health problems for heavy fowl in the form of bumble foot, or other joint problems arising out of an 8 -12 pound bird landing on a skeletal structure designed for only a 4 to 5 pound chicken.  The only alternative I see is to install an elevator and then train your birds to ride it.

I think you are thinking about the traditional, enclosed chicken "pen".  Mine is a chicken "yard" and I believe the OP was considering a similar option.  My yard is 240' long and 60' wide.  It has no "ceiling" - the 5' fence is all there is.  I truly did not understand your comment about a tall pen being hazardous to the health of a large bird.  That could certainly be the case if they were jumping into the pen from the top of the tallest part of the fence but not many pens are designed to encourage that.  I also didn't understand your reference to a skeletal structure designed for a 4-5 pound chicken!  What structure is this?  

 

My chicken yard is larger than most city backyards.  The birds run around in it - there isn't anything for them to jump off or down from.  However there is always fresh, green vegetation for them to eat, which is the goal - even with 100+ birds.  I will say that my solution is not for everyone.  In my case I figured that since I started this with the goal of producing eggs that are better than store-bought eggs, keeping them in a pen that contains no green vegetation wouldn't accomplish that goal very well.  So - I made them a yard large enough that they would never be able to eat all of the vegetation.  The main reason it works for us is that our poultry safe dogs are locked into the yard at night to act as a deterrent to predators.  Although the dogs are not there by day, their scent is there all the time and has kept the birds safe even though we regularly see coyotes and foxes elsewhere on our property.

Enjoying my 10-acres in the country with 100+ chickens and turkeys!  Blog is here.

 

Read about my fox attack here

A fox attack survival story

My hoop house

Should I add supplemental heat?

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Enjoying my 10-acres in the country with 100+ chickens and turkeys!  Blog is here.

 

Read about my fox attack here

A fox attack survival story

My hoop house

Should I add supplemental heat?

Reply
post #34 of 37
Quote:

Quote:

Originally Posted by HEChicken View Post

 

.... I truly did not understand your comment about a tall pen being hazardous to the health of a large bird.  That could certainly be the case if they were jumping into the pen from the top of the tallest part of the fence but not many pens are designed to encourage that.  I also didn't understand your reference to a skeletal structure designed for a 4-5 pound chicken! .... 

I was thinking about where a chicken sleeps.  They sleep on a roost and when a chicken gets out of bed they hit their bed room floor running.  Many duel breeds are unable to fly more than a foot or two vertically.  However their instinct still tells them that the highest roost pole is the best (safest) roost pole.  If there is a way for them to go higher to roost then they will find that path.  Then when such a chicken flies down from the roost their delicate joints and bones bare all the stress.  This can often result in injury.  Bumble foot is one such injury.

 

Do be advised that I doubt that there will be little if any thing green in a 14,000 square foot area if there are 100 + chickens eating the vegetation growing there in.  For your sake I hope that I am wrong, but I don't think that I am, wrong that is.  This is especially true in a place like Kansas. 


Edited by chickengeorgeto - 3/28/15 at 11:38pm
Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post
 

I was thinking about where a chicken sleeps.  They sleep on a roost and when a chicken gets out of bed they hit their bed room floor running.  Many duel breeds are unable to fly more than a foot or two vertically.  However their instinct still tells them that the highest roost pole is the best (safest) roost pole.  If there is a way for them to go higher to roost then they will find that path.  Then when such a chicken flies down from the roost their delicate joints and bones bare all the stress.  This can often result in injury.  Bumble foot is one such injury.

 

Do be advised that I doubt that there will be little if any thing green in a 14,000 square foot area if there are 100 + chickens eating the vegetation growing there in.  For your sake I hope that I am wrong, but I don't think that I am, wrong that is.  This is especially true in a place like Kansas. 

Okay.....your switch to talking about roosts and coops was what confused me in a thread about chicken yards.  I wasn't aware of any discussion of the coop in this thread.  However.....perhaps you missed that this is an old thread?  My chicken yard has been in operation more than three years now and I can assure you that not only has the vegetation withstood the birds, I actually have to get in there and mow it several times a year (on my riding mower).  I have found that they use the yard less when the grass gets too long, so as it grows, I get in there and mow it, and they spread out again, very excited to find bugs that were disturbed by the mowing.

Enjoying my 10-acres in the country with 100+ chickens and turkeys!  Blog is here.

 

Read about my fox attack here

A fox attack survival story

My hoop house

Should I add supplemental heat?

Reply

Enjoying my 10-acres in the country with 100+ chickens and turkeys!  Blog is here.

 

Read about my fox attack here

A fox attack survival story

My hoop house

Should I add supplemental heat?

Reply
post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by barbjess View Post
 

Thank you so much for the pictures and details about your gate.  We put half of the fencing up last weekend and will get the rest of the fencing up tomorrow then I will get the gates up during the week.  

 

One gate will be attached to a chain link fence post that we lined our t-post/welded wire fence up with just like you did with the existing wood fence-- it will be made with 2 by 4 with some fencing attached across it and now with your instructions I see how to attach it to the post using the screw eye over the male hinges and I like the idea of being able to lift the gate off completely for easier access with the wheel barrow.  The double ended clips to attach it to the welded wire is so much better than my plan to use a rope to tie and untie.  

 

The second gate is going to be between t-posts only and will only be used when I need to get the small tractor into the area so not often.  Until I come up with a better plan, I may just make a "gate" with the welded wire fence with one side of the welded wire in the gate area attached to the t-post and the other end of the welded wire loose.  I will use your idea of the double sided clips to keep it closed.

 

Many thanks for your help! 


Glad I could help.  Actually your mention of the tractor reminded me that I forgot to say I do have a larger drive through gate at the far end of my chicken yard as well.  All I did there was in a corner of the yard, rather than affix the fencing to the t-post with permanent ties, I used a temporary fastener.  The fence looks continuous all the way around but when I need to, I can undo the temporary fasteners in that corner and pull back a 10' section of fencing to drive through and into the chicken yard.  At the time I was building it, I thought it would be handy to have access if I ever wanted to use a tractor to clean out the coop, or to get a truck load of anything in there.  So far I haven't done either of those things but when I need to mow the yard, I'm very glad I put in the drive-through gate.  If I had to use the push mower on the yard (which I did one time when the riding mower was inop), it is a couple of hours work to mow it all :)

Enjoying my 10-acres in the country with 100+ chickens and turkeys!  Blog is here.

 

Read about my fox attack here

A fox attack survival story

My hoop house

Should I add supplemental heat?

Reply

Enjoying my 10-acres in the country with 100+ chickens and turkeys!  Blog is here.

 

Read about my fox attack here

A fox attack survival story

My hoop house

Should I add supplemental heat?

Reply
post #37 of 37

I like your duck!

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