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Cut feathers on feet?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I have a light brahma hen who is going through her first molt. Prior to the molt, the feathers on her feet were not that noticeable; they were small. But now they are huge and she is walking in a very pronounced way - lifting her feet very high each step. Poor thing probably feels like she is wearing clown shoes the feathers are so huge! Would it be okay to cut the feathers back a bit so she isn't overwhelmed by them? Or, is that not wise? I thought she'd get used to her new "feet", but it's been a month at least and she is still walking like they are in the way.

 

Thanks for any advice. :)

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."  - Anatole France
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"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."  - Anatole France
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post #2 of 4

I have no experience trimming feathers but just be careful as there are blood feathers that they can bleed to death if you aren't careful and they start bleeding. You might search byc for blood feather to see what I'm talking about???

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/search.php?search=blood+feather

I have feather footed chickens too and they do lift their feet up high as they walk. I wouldn't trim them if it were me.

Small flock of Black Australorps, EEs, and Nankins.

"The love of heaven makes one heavenly." - William Shakespeare

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Small flock of Black Australorps, EEs, and Nankins.

"The love of heaven makes one heavenly." - William Shakespeare

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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

Thank you; I'm so glad I asked. I will do some research on blood feathers. Maybe she will get used to her new feathered feet in time.

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."  - Anatole France
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"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."  - Anatole France
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post #4 of 4

I have a whole fleet of feathered feet. I can assure you that any feathers that are truly in the way of their walking, will get worn down naturally. There's no need whatsoever to try to trim them.

 

You do need to keep an eye on them, though, since they can get caked with feces and mud, which could lead to foot rot if ignored. I inspect feet often and do quick foot baths when needed, but often, simply pulling the caked mess off the feathers and from between the toes is sufficient.

One matronly and regal Light Brahma hen, two Silver-laced Wyandotte hens, two Gold-laced Wyandotte hens, one Black Cochin hen, two EE hens, one timid Buff Brahma hen, four obnoxious Speckled Sussex hens, five Welsummer hens, and one twenty-year old cat who is wary of all of them.
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One matronly and regal Light Brahma hen, two Silver-laced Wyandotte hens, two Gold-laced Wyandotte hens, one Black Cochin hen, two EE hens, one timid Buff Brahma hen, four obnoxious Speckled Sussex hens, five Welsummer hens, and one twenty-year old cat who is wary of all of them.
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