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post #11 of 52

With my guineas I know it might be harder now but if you can start on a schedule with them and try to get them every night at the same time.  I've learned that mine get used to the same sound.  I have a yell that i said everytime when they were younger letting them know that it is time to eat and they will normally go in without much work from me.  Probably when it gets colder will be the best time for them to get trained because they will be more relient on the food you provide, since there are less bugs around for food.

 

Also in my experience it will get easier with several years of guineas in the same coop because the older ones teach the others the routine.

post #12 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhinomeadows View Post

With my guineas I know it might be harder now but if you can start on a schedule with them and try to get them every night at the same time.  I've learned that mine get used to the same sound.  I have a yell that i said everytime when they were younger letting them know that it is time to eat and they will normally go in without much work from me.  Probably when it gets colder will be the best time for them to get trained because they will be more relient on the food you provide, since there are less bugs around for food.

 

Also in my experience it will get easier with several years of guineas in the same coop because the older ones teach the others the routine.

 

When you yell, it'd be a good idea to also begin clinking progressively harder on something that rings out, and calling a bit less over time. When we only use our vioces, it makes it really hard on neighbors/friends/family to fill in for us when we need 'em to ~'-)

"Gallus gallus domesticus,
or the organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop?"

~ possibly asked by Linnaeus in 1758, whilst classifying the domesticated fowl.

 

Common Diseases of Chickens Turkeys & Gamebirds
Poultry Disease Diagnosis Based on Symptoms
The Merck Veterinary Manual

Solutions Used for Poultry

Diseases of Poultry

 

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"Gallus gallus domesticus,
or the organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop?"

~ possibly asked by Linnaeus in 1758, whilst classifying the domesticated fowl.

 

Common Diseases of Chickens Turkeys & Gamebirds
Poultry Disease Diagnosis Based on Symptoms
The Merck Veterinary Manual

Solutions Used for Poultry

Diseases of Poultry

 

Reply
post #13 of 52

I purchased my guineas with my chickens so where one went they all went.  I kept them in the run for about 3 weeks (no free range).  Everyday about 2-3 I'd go out with "dinner" something special and a plastic contain with lid half filled with bird seed.  I shake the container and call (whatever you want).  I'd open the gate and drop their "dinner" in.  I did this every day.  Then I let them out to free range, gave them 10minutes to check things out then I'd step in the yard, call and shake the container, they'd come running in I'd close the gate.  Patience is all I can say.  The chickens catch on immediately, the guineas well it was always one thing or another.  They couldn't find the entrance to the yard, they'd run in the wrong direction.  OMG.  Eventually they would hear the garage and I'd start calling by the time I got to the coop they were in the yard waiting.  By 3 pm they were closed in the yard.  It was their choice when to in the coop, the yard is totally secure.  If you put a light on in the coop when it gets dark they will go in.  Put it on a timer so it will go on just before dark off 1 hr after.  Good luck.  I'm not sure we can breed the wild out of guineas, they are very easily frightened, skiddish.

post #14 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowcreekgeek View Post

When you yell, it'd be a good idea to also begin clinking progressively harder on something that rings out, and calling a bit less over time. When we only use our vioces, it makes it really hard on neighbors/friends/family to fill in for us when we need 'em to ~'-)

 

This isn't the case with my flocks... both my Mom and my neighbor have successfully called my birds (using my food call) to get them to coop up  or to give them treats. I've even had keet/Guinea customers call to my birds just so they could see that with consistent conditioning the birds would all come running to them, and that they could eventually get theirs to do the same wink.png


Edited by PeepsCA - 11/1/12 at 10:12am
... Flew the Coop, Twice.
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... Flew the Coop, Twice.
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post #15 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeepsCA View Post

 

This isn't the case with my flocks... both my Mom and my neighbor have successfully called my birds (using my food call) to get them to coop up  or to give them treats. I've even had keet/Guinea customers call to my birds just so they could see that with consistent conditioning the birds would all come running to them, and that they could eventually get theirs to do the same wink.png

 

I'm guilty of makin' an assumption based upon experiences w/ other animals here on the farm. It sounds as if they're responding to the actual word used, as when a dog or horse responds specifically to it's name, unless ...

If you (or, somebody else) were to speak in a similar manner, but not at the usual time(s), do they still come?
 

"Gallus gallus domesticus,
or the organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop?"

~ possibly asked by Linnaeus in 1758, whilst classifying the domesticated fowl.

 

Common Diseases of Chickens Turkeys & Gamebirds
Poultry Disease Diagnosis Based on Symptoms
The Merck Veterinary Manual

Solutions Used for Poultry

Diseases of Poultry

 

Reply
"Gallus gallus domesticus,
or the organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop?"

~ possibly asked by Linnaeus in 1758, whilst classifying the domesticated fowl.

 

Common Diseases of Chickens Turkeys & Gamebirds
Poultry Disease Diagnosis Based on Symptoms
The Merck Veterinary Manual

Solutions Used for Poultry

Diseases of Poultry

 

Reply
post #16 of 52

It's more the tone that's used as they repeat the word, rather than the specific word. I think anyone could say any word that rhymed with my food call and my flocks would still come running tho. Guineas aren't always the brainiest of birds, but they are smart enough to never miss out on the yummies.

 

ETA: I can call my birds any time of the day and they will all come running... I establish that by calling them on and off thru the day for treats (and a head count) during their initial conditioning. After they reliably run or fly to me I do this a little less frequently. It keeps them guessin', because they do not want to miss out. It also helps keep them a little closer to home.


Edited by PeepsCA - 11/1/12 at 6:42pm
... Flew the Coop, Twice.
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... Flew the Coop, Twice.
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post #17 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeepsCA View Post

It's more the tone that's used as they repeat the word, rather than the specific word. I think anyone could say any word that rhymed with my food call and my flocks would still come running tho. Guineas aren't always the brainiest of birds, but they are smart enough to never miss out on the yummies.

 

ETA: I can call my birds any time of the day and they will all come running... I establish that by calling them on and off thru the day for treats (and a head count) during their initial conditioning. After they reliably run or fly to me I do this a little less frequently. It keeps them guessin', because they do not want to miss out. It also helps keep them a little closer to home.

 

SoOo, my screamin' nasty, fowl (pun intended) words at the one that escaped far too early to ever ruturn was probably a mistake ~'-)

 

Excellent idea to keep 'em so responsive, too. I've quite a few more predators than most have to deal with, and have no intention of reducing the populations of hawks, fox or bobcats ... the coyotes, on the other hand, are gonna suffer a continuous drop in population (one, by one ~'-)

"Gallus gallus domesticus,
or the organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop?"

~ possibly asked by Linnaeus in 1758, whilst classifying the domesticated fowl.

 

Common Diseases of Chickens Turkeys & Gamebirds
Poultry Disease Diagnosis Based on Symptoms
The Merck Veterinary Manual

Solutions Used for Poultry

Diseases of Poultry

 

Reply
"Gallus gallus domesticus,
or the organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop?"

~ possibly asked by Linnaeus in 1758, whilst classifying the domesticated fowl.

 

Common Diseases of Chickens Turkeys & Gamebirds
Poultry Disease Diagnosis Based on Symptoms
The Merck Veterinary Manual

Solutions Used for Poultry

Diseases of Poultry

 

Reply
post #18 of 52

It is important to establish a "core flock" of at least 10 Guinea birds. It does not matter what sex they are. By this I mean to have these birds trained to go out in the morning and come back to roost at dusk from which they roost every night. This may take some time and a few birds. There are various training methods. I have found the birds like a VERY hight roost and they enjoy having a low wattage light on so they can see what is below them. I use game bird in a feeder and white millet for a treat to bring them in the barn.

They are such good flyers that no roost is too high. I have a stud horse in the barn and they and him get along just fine.

Once you establish a "core flock", you can add to it a bit at a time. I have about 25 or so Guinea birds and they cover my property in the day and come to roost every night.

The older birds will teach the younger ones the ropes. No Guinea bird likes to be alone. they will automatically follow the "rasp" group around.

Good Luck and have fun with these "dinos".

Guinea Data:   http://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/species.jsp?avibaseid=1044B438EE7556BB


Guinea Info:   http://www.guineafowlinternational.org/


Guinea Keets:   visit your local hatchery


Poultry Solutions:   http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html


“Never interrupt your enemy while he is making a mistake.” ― Napolean Bonaparte:

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Guinea Data:   http://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/species.jsp?avibaseid=1044B438EE7556BB


Guinea Info:   http://www.guineafowlinternational.org/


Guinea Keets:   visit your local hatchery


Poultry Solutions:   http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html


“Never interrupt your enemy while he is making a mistake.” ― Napolean Bonaparte:

Reply
post #19 of 52

My Guinea birds KNOW when I have a loaf of bread in my hand. I can not beat them off until tney get their fill. They ALL come a running, heck I do not even have to call any more.!!

It is a good thing. They get a nice meal and I get to see them all for a close look on their health.

Guinea Data:   http://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/species.jsp?avibaseid=1044B438EE7556BB


Guinea Info:   http://www.guineafowlinternational.org/


Guinea Keets:   visit your local hatchery


Poultry Solutions:   http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html


“Never interrupt your enemy while he is making a mistake.” ― Napolean Bonaparte:

Reply

Guinea Data:   http://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/species.jsp?avibaseid=1044B438EE7556BB


Guinea Info:   http://www.guineafowlinternational.org/


Guinea Keets:   visit your local hatchery


Poultry Solutions:   http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html


“Never interrupt your enemy while he is making a mistake.” ― Napolean Bonaparte:

Reply
post #20 of 52
Thread Starter 

Success!  Finally!  I've been trying to get my five guineas to go into the coop at night with no success until just the last few nights.  I guess it finally got cold enough.  That and someone here responded to my earlier post and said to remove their outside roosting bar.  We have an old carport that I put up 2x4 wire and chicken wire around it for a run.  And inside that is a 4x8 coop that is elevated 2 feet off the ground.  When I removed their roosting bar that was outside the coop they started flying up on top of the coop but wouldn't go in.  Then one night I saw one little guinea was on the roost inside the coop.  The next night another and still another the next night.  Tonight the lone holdout finally went in at dark and got up on the roost.  

 

Now I can take my mind off that and think about why my 24 BSL's haven't started laying yet.  They're 26 weeks old and not a single egg yet.  The previous flock of 24 Gold Comets were laying by 26 weeks pretty strongly.  I've left empty Banquet Chicken Pot Pie pans down in the run and hung up a picture of Mrs. Tweety's Chicken Pot Pie machine from the movie Chicken Run but nothing yet...

Twenty-two Black Sex Link hens, four guineas, one dachsund/whatever-was-loose-that-night dog, another who-knows-what-it-is dog, one long-haired, long-tailed cat with an attitude, 180,000 Italian honey bees (give or take 5 or 6), and one wife of undetermined origin.

 

Twenty years of schooling and they put you on the day shift...

b. dylan

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Twenty-two Black Sex Link hens, four guineas, one dachsund/whatever-was-loose-that-night dog, another who-knows-what-it-is dog, one long-haired, long-tailed cat with an attitude, 180,000 Italian honey bees (give or take 5 or 6), and one wife of undetermined origin.

 

Twenty years of schooling and they put you on the day shift...

b. dylan

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