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Is It Intestines or Umbilical Cord? - Page 2

post #11 of 17

I am really thinking that there is not much you can do and that you will lose this little one.  As long as he is not suffering, you can try keeping it moist with some vaseline or with a mister of warm water.  If it is peeping incessantly, lethargic, or being cannibalized, it would be kindest to end his life quickly.

TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

for nothing goats.  Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

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TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

for nothing goats.  Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

Reply
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

I saw on one thread that a person said that if it's acting normal from the start, then he's fine.  I've given him some water, and he's still in the incubator (still-air).  He's starting to kind of run around...he's a perfectly normal chick except for this 'thing' hanging from his backside.

 

If I do have to...what is the best way to put him down?  I've never done any such thing, so I wouldn't know the first part to doing it...

post #13 of 17

It looks like prolapse, I was hoping it wasn't... I'm so sorry. I asked a vet friend of mine what I could do with mine and he suggested euthanising it. Mine was obviously in some degree of discomfort though, so my DH took care of it. It had the intestine hanging out in a loop, so there was no way it could poo. 

If your chick seems o.k. hang loose with it for a bit and see what happens. Which thread are you referring to? If there is hope for your little one, give it a chance. fl.gif

 

“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

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“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

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post #14 of 17

Do a search on humane euthanasia and you will see many methods.  I would opt for what ever you see as the quickest and surest and then the easiest on you.  Don't do it too soon and don't do it too late.  Watch the chick and make sure it is the right choice, but once you are sure, don't put if off.  It is not as hard when you know it has to be done, but it is harder to do the longer you wait and not fair to the chick to prolong suffering because you don't like the idea of killing it.  If you just can't do it, find someone who can and make sure they do it humanely.

 

I have only done it once, and I put the chick in a ziplock bag and put the baggie in a small paper sack.  I then put it under the tire of the car and backed over it.  I know it was killed quickly and I didn't have to look at it afterward.  It was still very hard, but the kindest thing I could do. 

TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

for nothing goats.  Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

Reply

TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

for nothing goats.  Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

Reply
post #15 of 17

I've had chicks hatch like that and have never had them make it.  When you start hearing them clicking when they breathe, it's time to put them down.  Best way I've found to take care of baby chicks are a pair of sharp pruning shears.  Dig the hole first, then you can drop it when it's done.  It's quick for the chick, but unfortunately, not easy on the person doing it.  I'm so sorry.

Was breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders. Not anymore thanks to a bobcat.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 8th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1151482/the-8th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50#post_18028604

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Was breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders. Not anymore thanks to a bobcat.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 8th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1151482/the-8th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50#post_18028604

Reply
post #16 of 17
I need help from someone who has experience in these issues. Umbilical cord is attached to small intestines. I had it happen before. I have a chicken die newborn or if I taken them to vet uthanized. I want to help these one at home if I can.
post #17 of 17
Mine is from all my male roosters its genetic issues.the problem is if you destroy your roosters. And get more. The chances of it happens again depends on roosters themselves do it can happen with every rooster you get.
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