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Baking Yeast

post #1 of 7
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Hi, just curious, is it okay to feed baking yeast to chickens?  I see information about Brewer's yeast - is that different from baking yeast?

Thanks!

luvaudiobooks

post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvaudiobooks View Post

Hi, just curious, is it okay to feed baking yeast to chickens?  I see information about Brewer's yeast - is that different from baking yeast?

Thanks!

luvaudiobooks

Brewers yeast and Baking yeast are different, Brewers yeast has more nutrition than Bakers yeast. 

 

Chris

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvaudiobooks View Post

Hi, just curious, is it okay to feed baking yeast to chickens?  I see information about Brewer's yeast - is that different from baking yeast?

Thanks!

luvaudiobooks

 

Although I don't know everything about chickens (yet), working as a brewer/distiller for the past 6 years has taught me a whole lot about yeast.  

Bakers yeast is perfectly fine to feed to chickens and is a heck of alot cheaper than Brewers yeast when you buy it by the brick.  One isn't anymore nutritious than the other any more than a Barred Rock is more nutritious than a Rhode Island Red.

  Bakers yeast and Brewers yeast are different strains of the same organism, the fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  Similar to different breeds in chickens  They both consume sugars and expell co2 and ethanol.  The main difference is that Brewers yeast has been "bred" for higher attenuation (alcohol tolerance) and flocculation (ability to cling together and fall out of solution at the end of fermentation).  Most of the yeast sold as Bakers Yeast is just Brewers yeast that didn't make the cut in the lab (*Red Star).  Many people, including moonshiners, still use Bakers yeast for their fermentations.  It just bottoms out @ around 8% abv where Brewers/Wine/Distillers yeast will go past 12-15%.  Popcorn Sutton swore by Bakers yeast and wouldn't use anything else.  There are also many artisan bakers using Brewers yeast in their old world, peasant-style bread recipes.

  Now if you brewed your own beer and gave the spent grains/yeast to your chickens after it was finished fermenting and separated from from the beer, it would be more nutrient-rich than yeast alone.  Yeast is high in B vitamins (except B-12), chromium, magnesium, potassium, selenium,


Edited by HouseCat - 1/8/13 at 7:25pm

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post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by HouseCat View Post

 

Although I don't know everything about chickens (yet), working as a brewer/distiller for the past 6 years has taught me a whole lot about yeast.  

Bakers yeast is perfectly fine to feed to chickens and is a heck of alot cheaper than Brewers yeast when you buy it by the brick.  One isn't anymore nutritious than the other any more than a Barred Rock is more nutritious than a Rhode Island Red.

  Bakers yeast and Brewers yeast are different strains of the same organism, the fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  Similar to different breeds in chickens  They both consume sugars and expell co2 and ethanol.  The main difference is that Brewers yeast has been "bred" for higher attenuation (alcohol tolerance) and flocculation (ability to cling together and fall out of solution at the end of fermentation).  Most of the yeast sold as Bakers Yeast is just Brewers yeast that didn't make the cut in the lab (*Red Star).  Many people, including moonshiners, still use Bakers yeast for their fermentations.  It just bottoms out @ around 8% abv where Brewers/Wine/Distillers yeast will go past 12-15%.  Popcorn Sutton swore by Bakers yeast and wouldn't use anything else.  There are also many artisan bakers using Brewers yeast in their old world, peasant-style bread recipes.

  Now if you brewed your own beer and gave the spent grains/yeast to your chickens after it was finished fermenting and separated from from the beer, it would be more nutrient-rich than yeast alone.  Yeast is high in B vitamins (except B-12), chromium, magnesium, potassium, selenium,

You may want to look more into the nutritional value of these yeasts.

Brewer's yeast provides B-complex vitamins as well as many valuable minerals, including calcium, potassium, iron and selenium. It is also one of the richest sources of chromium, which baker's yeast does not contain, and has all of the essential amino acids, which comprise about half its weight.

There is a good reason why Feed Mfg. use Brewer's Yeast in livestock feed and not Bakers Yeast.

 

Chris

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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post #5 of 7

I found the Livestrong.com article that you pulled your quote from:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/418496-what-is-the-difference-between-brewers-yeast-bakers-yeast/

 

It is peppered with inaccuracies,  Here are two:

 

"Brewer's yeast is considered an inactive yeast while baker's yeast is an active yeast" -False.  Both yeasts are active (alive) until they have been killed via temp or pressure.

 

"You can't brew alcohol with baker's yeast and you can't leaven bread with brewer's yeast" -False.  This is just laughable as well as simply untrue.

 

  The Brewers yeast added by feed manufacturers consists of the entire yeast cake that has settled on the bottom of the fermenting vessels in breweries.  This cake consists of not only live yeast but dead (or inactive) yeast as well as fines- yeast byproducts and grain particles.  In most nutritional supplements sold at Health stores, this is the product in the jars/canisters being offered after all live cells have been heated and killed-off or deactivated.  It is not pure Brewers yeast as this is where the added nutrition comes from.

 

I counted well over 20 articles pertaining to Brewers yeast and many of them contradict each other repeatedly.  I'm guessing anyone who over-values their own opinion can publish an article on Livestrong.  They either have a poor Fact Checking department or require no qualifications for  whoever writes for them.

Artisan Distiller, Homebrewer, Pigeon Advocate, and Chicken Lover.

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post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by HouseCat View Post

I found the Livestrong.com article that you pulled your quote from:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/418496-what-is-the-difference-between-brewers-yeast-bakers-yeast/

 

It is peppered with inaccuracies,  Here are two:

 

"Brewer's yeast is considered an inactive yeast while baker's yeast is an active yeast" -False.  Both yeasts are active (alive) until they have been killed via temp or pressure.

 

"You can't brew alcohol with baker's yeast and you can't leaven bread with brewer's yeast" -False.  This is just laughable as well as simply untrue.

 

  The Brewers yeast added by feed manufacturers consists of the entire yeast cake that has settled on the bottom of the fermenting vessels in breweries.  This cake consists of not only live yeast but dead (or inactive) yeast as well as fines- yeast byproducts and grain particles.  In most nutritional supplements sold at Health stores, this is the product in the jars/canisters being offered after all live cells have been heated and killed-off or deactivated.  It is not pure Brewers yeast as this is where the added nutrition comes from.

 

I counted well over 20 articles pertaining to Brewers yeast and many of them contradict each other repeatedly.  I'm guessing anyone who over-values their own opinion can publish an article on Livestrong.  They either have a poor Fact Checking department or require no qualifications for  whoever writes for them.

Actually it is from another source.

 

The brewers yeast that is used in some of the better livestock feed mix is a custom 'fermented' yeast that is far more nutritional that a "normal" yeast and is not the yeast cake that has settled in the vats from a brewery or distiller, now there are some feed mfg. that will use the lesser quality yeast cakes but if it is from a brew that had hops it is added to a slurry mix of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Phosphate to "kill" the bitter taste then washed and dried. 

 

Chris


Edited by Chris09 - 1/9/13 at 12:56pm

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris09 View Post

Actually it is from another source.

 

 


   Really?  Because it matches your reply word for word.  Eerie.  

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