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Severe bumblefoot surgery **GRAPHIC**

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 
I wanted to share this so that it could be a learning experience for others.

A little background. This is a blue copper Marans rooster who will be 3 in the spring. Skye has had a hard life and it always Seems like he gets beat up by others even though he is the biggest rooster I have. About a month ago he got beat up by one of my Tom turkeys. He was injured very badly and I was not sure that he was going to make it. Both of his eyes were injured, his comb, and various other serious injuries. He also had some serious injuries to his foot. I decided to treat the life-threatening ones first and ignored his foot. Long story short Skye pulled through and it was time to concentrate on his foot. By this time his foot had swollen tremendously and was obviously a severe case of bumble foot. I tried the usual treatments for bumble foot and it did not make any difference. I should also note that I do not ever under any circumstances give antibiotics. Sunday I decided that we needed to perform surgery in order to get the staph infection out. I did not want to cut on his entire foot at the same time as I felt that it would be too much to handle at once. We made one small incision Sunday and pulled a large staph infection plug out. We did use Betadine to disinfect the area prior to surgery. I used Teatree oil inside the wound and also on other parts of his foot prior to wrapping it.

Today I unwrapped his foot and the wound that we cut looked great, swelling down tremendously in that area. However the Teatree oil obviously worked and was pulling a large amount of staph infection out to the surface.

Today I basically soaked his foot in hot water, pulled out all the scab and staph infection plugs that I could.

I've attached some pictures for you to see the progress of today. Please do not condone me for the Condition of his foot. I had to make a choice on whether he lived or died and had to treat the more serious injuries first.

This is after unwrapping his bandage. You can see where we made the incision Sunday on the left side.



Skye soaking in the tub. He's smart and used his wing over the tub for balance.



This is after I cut, pulled, and dug out every staph plug I could. Those are some huge holes!



Tea tree oil applied and bandaged. I did this surgery myself with no help. I wrapped him in a towel and he didn't move the entire time.



The majority of the plugs I got out.

I hope this helps someone else.
Edited by startingover - 12/4/12 at 10:44am

Mother to  24 Randall Cattle,  14 Hog Island Sheep, 100+ guinea fowl, ducks, chickens, turkey's, 4 horses, 3 Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, 6 cats, 2 human daughters, and a very caring, animal loving DH!

 

 

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Mother to  24 Randall Cattle,  14 Hog Island Sheep, 100+ guinea fowl, ducks, chickens, turkey's, 4 horses, 3 Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, 6 cats, 2 human daughters, and a very caring, animal loving DH!

 

 

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post #2 of 44

Great job on your surgery! Hope your little chickie does ok! hugs.gif

I have: 2 leopard geckos, 1 ball python, 6 white mice, and incubator full of eggs, 1 Pomeranian, 3 cats, 3 Plymouth barred rock hens, 3 brown leghorn hens, 1 brown leghorn rooster, 2 black crested black polish bantam hens, 1 black crested black polish bantam rooster, 1 partridge silkie hen, 2 white silkie cockerels, a pair of breeding black-tailed buff Japanese bantams, 1 grey pearl guinea...

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I have: 2 leopard geckos, 1 ball python, 6 white mice, and incubator full of eggs, 1 Pomeranian, 3 cats, 3 Plymouth barred rock hens, 3 brown leghorn hens, 1 brown leghorn rooster, 2 black crested black polish bantam hens, 1 black crested black polish bantam rooster, 1 partridge silkie hen, 2 white silkie cockerels, a pair of breeding black-tailed buff Japanese bantams, 1 grey pearl guinea...

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post #3 of 44

I'm not so sure about this...seems wrong to start cutting off pieces of foot without numbing or anaesthetic, then again I don't know how or what chickens feel...so...

It could happen. Just remember, Pluto used to be a planet.

And when things go wrong, always remember, even geese cheat sometimes.

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It could happen. Just remember, Pluto used to be a planet.

And when things go wrong, always remember, even geese cheat sometimes.

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post #4 of 44
Thread Starter 
I did not cut off a single portion of skin. Bumblefoot forms plugs that once loosened from the outer skin, come out easily. The outer scabs is what adheres to the skin. The areas where I was working did not have nerves because its infection - not skin. Those gaping holes were made by the size of the infection plugs.

If this had been painful for him, I would not have been able to do this by myself. That towel is wrapped around him loosely just enough to keep him on his side (and feeling secure) so that his foot was exposed. He could have gotten up any time he wanted but he didn't. So obviously I did not cause him any pain.

And the blood you see is great IMHO. That means he still has very healthy circulation to this area and it still clots on its own very quickly.

I think it would have been considered neglect and abuse had I NOT done something with it.

Mother to  24 Randall Cattle,  14 Hog Island Sheep, 100+ guinea fowl, ducks, chickens, turkey's, 4 horses, 3 Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, 6 cats, 2 human daughters, and a very caring, animal loving DH!

 

 

Reply

Mother to  24 Randall Cattle,  14 Hog Island Sheep, 100+ guinea fowl, ducks, chickens, turkey's, 4 horses, 3 Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, 6 cats, 2 human daughters, and a very caring, animal loving DH!

 

 

Reply
post #5 of 44

Chicken's brains are too small to react to pain the way people do. They have no reaction during surgery and, not all, but a lot of pain meds and anaesthetics are bad for birds. This is a simple, easy procedure that does not hurt the bird.

 

Plus, I would rather you cut the infection off of my foot than let me die of something easily solved.


Edited by ChickensRDinos - 12/4/12 at 11:38am
post #6 of 44
Yep, well said.

I have: 2 leopard geckos, 1 ball python, 6 white mice, and incubator full of eggs, 1 Pomeranian, 3 cats, 3 Plymouth barred rock hens, 3 brown leghorn hens, 1 brown leghorn rooster, 2 black crested black polish bantam hens, 1 black crested black polish bantam rooster, 1 partridge silkie hen, 2 white silkie cockerels, a pair of breeding black-tailed buff Japanese bantams, 1 grey pearl guinea...

Reply

I have: 2 leopard geckos, 1 ball python, 6 white mice, and incubator full of eggs, 1 Pomeranian, 3 cats, 3 Plymouth barred rock hens, 3 brown leghorn hens, 1 brown leghorn rooster, 2 black crested black polish bantam hens, 1 black crested black polish bantam rooster, 1 partridge silkie hen, 2 white silkie cockerels, a pair of breeding black-tailed buff Japanese bantams, 1 grey pearl guinea...

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post #7 of 44

When you have a case of bumblefoot you have to do this surgery!!!!! Thanks for sharing!!!! if I ever have to do this I will refer back to this thread.

Owner of five very spoiled hens and two lovely Muscovy ducks,too many cats and three dogs.

 

"Why should A Man Die While Sage Grows In His Garden?" 

 

1 Production Red

1 Buff Orpington

3 Barred Rocks

 

 

 

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Owner of five very spoiled hens and two lovely Muscovy ducks,too many cats and three dogs.

 

"Why should A Man Die While Sage Grows In His Garden?" 

 

1 Production Red

1 Buff Orpington

3 Barred Rocks

 

 

 

Reply
post #8 of 44

Well that is very very interesting, thanks for making the effort to do this whilst also attending your bird.

I have a blog here about our 40 Chickens, 7 Ducks, 3 Geese, 2 Shetland Ponies and our 6 Soay Sheep, we are trying to avoid mowing our field hence the Ponies and Sheep!

 

http://dallascriftins.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Everyone is welcome

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I have a blog here about our 40 Chickens, 7 Ducks, 3 Geese, 2 Shetland Ponies and our 6 Soay Sheep, we are trying to avoid mowing our field hence the Ponies and Sheep!

 

http://dallascriftins.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Everyone is welcome

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post #9 of 44
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys! Skye is doing great today and putting more weight back on his foot. I will unwrap it later today and see how it looks!

Mother to  24 Randall Cattle,  14 Hog Island Sheep, 100+ guinea fowl, ducks, chickens, turkey's, 4 horses, 3 Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, 6 cats, 2 human daughters, and a very caring, animal loving DH!

 

 

Reply

Mother to  24 Randall Cattle,  14 Hog Island Sheep, 100+ guinea fowl, ducks, chickens, turkey's, 4 horses, 3 Anatolian Shepherd Dogs, 6 cats, 2 human daughters, and a very caring, animal loving DH!

 

 

Reply
post #10 of 44

As far as letting his foot go to care for his other wounds, I would have done the same thing.  I have never seen Bumblefoot and am so glad you posted these pictures.  Now if I ever have a case, I will know what to do.  Why didn't the infection spread throughout his body?  You would think being a staph infection it would have spread and it would have gone into the bloodstream.  Although I have had chickens for a long time, I am still learning.  Congratulations on giving him such good care and saving him and again, thank you for posting the pictures.

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