BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Social › Where am I? Where are you! › INDIANA BYC'ers HERE!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

INDIANA BYC'ers HERE! - Page 4030

post #40291 of 50224
To our Indianapolis BYC'ers - do you know a local veterinarian who treats chickens? I'm hoping I never need one, but would like to know who to call if the need arises.
One Urban Chicken Tractor with 2 BR, 1 Speckled Sussex, 1 buff Orpington and 1 RIR hens.
Reply
One Urban Chicken Tractor with 2 BR, 1 Speckled Sussex, 1 buff Orpington and 1 RIR hens.
Reply
post #40292 of 50224

The Chickenfest planning committee and myself have been discussing bio-security measures that we can take to ensure that the the upcoming Chickenfest will be as safe as possible for everyone attending.  I have been in contact with Dr. Geoff Lossie regarding this matter.

 

Here is the information that I have received from him;

Here is the info that I have compiled for you on Avian Influenza. Once you read it please let me know if you have any questions. In terms of protecting yourself from others who may not follow good biosecurity, the best thing you can do is practice good biosecurity yourself as outlined in the document (showering and laundering clothes when returning from shows, and wearing all clean clothes before coming into contact with your own birds etc). In terms of carrying it in your nares, technically it is possible, but I would not worry too much about it. I discussed car cleanliness in the document as well. I also put in the document two great websites to visit for further biosecurity info.

If people have disease concerns in their flocks and need guidance they can call the ADDL at 765-494-7440.

 

Biosecurity: Preventing Avian Influenza

 

 

Biosecurity is an essential component of site management, and is necessary to keep your birds healthy. Biosecurity is especially important and on everyone’s mind with the presence of avian influenza here in the Midwest. Avian influenza is being spread by wild waterfowl, who are not affected by the disease. The disease is shed in the feces as well as in respiratory secretions. The disease can live upwards of 2 weeks in the proper environment (cold, and wet conditions are best). The virus can easily be spread by fomites (inanimate object capable of becoming contaminated with infectious organisms allowing the organism to spread).  Articles such as footwear, farm equipment, automobiles, clothing, and other items if contaminated with feces or respiratory secretions from INFECTED birds, are all capable of transporting the virus. We do not, at this time recommend poultry meetings to allow live birds anywhere on the premises for trade or sale between participants due to the threat of disease spread. Trading of eggs is also very risky, as the shells (not the developing embryo) can be easily contaminated by feces, containing the virus, when the egg is laid. While our egg supply is safe, we don’t recommend bringing anything to the fair that can drag disease with it such as eggs. If eggs are brought we recommend they be sanitized with a dilute bleach solution.

 

 

All of this being said, regional and national poultry meetings are still taking place successfully. Carefully arranged meetings that stress the importance of the participants’ being “clean” and following basic biosecurity measures, have not been shown to be a significant risk of disease spread.

 

 

Below will be outlined some essential procedures that should be complied with by those intending to attend poultry meetings, 4H fairs, or poultry shows.

 

  1. Restricted access: Keep access to your property and your birds restricted to essential persons only.
  2. Keep things clean and don’t bring disease home: Clean and disinfect your clothes, shoes, equipment, and hands. This is especially important when traveling to poultry meetings or livestock shows. Always wear fully laundered clothes to these events and never wear boots or shoes that have been used around poultry. We recommend showering before and after attending an event. When returning from shows, make sure to launder all clothes and disinfect any acquired equipment before coming into contact with your birds. DO NOT come into contact with your birds until you have showered and donned clean clothes.
  3. Don’t risk disease from your neighbor: do not borrow lawn and garden equipment (including automobiles), tools, or poultry supplies from other bird owners. Insist that any persons coming onto your property have clean clothes and shoes that have not been in contact with poultry or poultry premises. Having disposable boot/shoe covers available for visitors is recommended.
  4. Do not purchase birds from sale barns, auctions, or swap meets where birds are allowed to mingle.
  5. Avoid unnecessary exposure: If you still decide to show at fairs and poultry exhibits, you may want to limit the number of birds you bring, and do not bring your most valuable birds, unless you are willing to accept the risk.
  6. Post exhibition cleanliness: Keep all birds that have been shown at fairs, isolated from your other birds for a minimum of 30 days. Ideal isolation would be in a completely separate barn or enclosure located away from your other birds.
  7. Discourage wild waterfowl from your property: Do not feed wildlife or allow them access to your bird’s feed. Consider covering ponds or fencing off water features to prevent your birds from coming into direct contact with wild waterfowl or waterways that may be used by wild waterfowl.
  8. Automobiles: Prior to, and after visiting poultry shows/premises, wash all visible dirt and grime from the automobile and clean out any poultry waste or dirt (bed of truck, trunk etc) paying special notice to wheels and undercarriage. Floor mats can be laundered or sprayed with Lysol.
  9. Watch out for signs of disease: Most importantly watch for increased flock mortality (deaths), as this may be the only sign of an outbreak. See last link for a list of other possible signs of avian influenza.

 

For further information regarding avian influenza and proper biosecurity, visit:

 

http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov/

 

Below is a statement put out by the state veterinarian for Indiana.

 

http://www.in.gov/boah/files/HPAI_PrepSurvRep_AH-4-28-15(2).pdf

 

Geoffrey Lossie, D.V.M.
Resident, Poultry Diagnostic Medicine
Purdue University, Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory

 

A couple of the things that we will be changing this year from previous years, is we will not be allowing any live birds to be brought to the event for sale, swap or trade purposes. Eggs that are being brought for sale, trade or swap purposes will have to be kept in the vehicles and all exchanges will have to be done at the vehicles, and hands will have to be washed/sanatized immediately after exchanges.  While this may seem to be somewhat extreme to some, we are doing this to help protect everyone.

post #40293 of 50224
Thanks! This is a great resource. Can we get it into a document on our Indiana BYC info page so it can be easily accessible?
Quote:
Originally Posted by barb s View Post

The Chickenfest planning committee and myself have been discussing bio-security measures that we can take to ensure that the the upcoming Chickenfest will be as safe as possible for everyone attending.  I have been in contact with Dr. Geoff Lossie regarding this matter.

Here is the information that I have received from him;
Here is the info that I have compiled for you on Avian Influenza. Once you read it please let me know if you have any questions. In terms of protecting yourself from others who may not follow good biosecurity, the best thing you can do is practice good biosecurity yourself as outlined in the document (showering and laundering clothes when returning from shows, and wearing all clean clothes before coming into contact with your own birds etc). In terms of carrying it in your nares, technically it is possible, but I would not worry too much about it. I discussed car cleanliness in the document as well. I also put in the document two great websites to visit for further biosecurity info.
If people have disease concerns in their flocks and need guidance they can call the ADDL at 765-494-7440.

Biosecurity: Preventing Avian Influenza


Biosecurity is an essential component of site management, and is necessary to keep your birds healthy. Biosecurity is especially important and on everyone’s mind with the presence of avian influenza here in the Midwest. Avian influenza is being spread by wild waterfowl, who are not affected by the disease. The disease is shed in the feces as well as in respiratory secretions. The disease can live upwards of 2 weeks in the proper environment (cold, and wet conditions are best). The virus can easily be spread by fomites (inanimate object capable of becoming contaminated with infectious organisms allowing the organism to spread).  Articles such as footwear, farm equipment, automobiles, clothing, and other items if contaminated with feces or respiratory secretions from INFECTED birds, are all capable of transporting the virus. We do not, at this time recommend poultry meetings to allow live birds anywhere on the premises for trade or sale between participants due to the threat of disease spread. Trading of eggs is also very risky, as the shells (not the developing embryo) can be easily contaminated by feces, containing the virus, when the egg is laid. While our egg supply is safe, we don’t recommend bringing anything to the fair that can drag disease with it such as eggs. If eggs are brought we recommend they be sanitized with a dilute bleach solution.


All of this being said, regional and national poultry meetings are still taking place successfully. Carefully arranged meetings that stress the importance of the participants’ being “clean” and following basic biosecurity measures, have not been shown to be a significant risk of disease spread.


Below will be outlined some essential procedures that should be complied with by those intending to attend poultry meetings, 4H fairs, or poultry shows.
  1. Restricted access: Keep access to your property and your birds restricted to essential persons only.
  2. Keep things clean and don’t bring disease home: Clean and disinfect your clothes, shoes, equipment, and hands. This is especially important when traveling to poultry meetings or livestock shows. Always wear fully laundered clothes to these events and never wear boots or shoes that have been used around poultry. We recommend showering before and after attending an event. When returning from shows, make sure to launder all clothes and disinfect any acquired equipment before coming into contact with your birds. DO NOT come into contact with your birds until you have showered and donned clean clothes.
  3. Don’t risk disease from your neighbor: do not borrow lawn and garden equipment (including automobiles), tools, or poultry supplies from other bird owners. Insist that any persons coming onto your property have clean clothes and shoes that have not been in contact with poultry or poultry premises. Having disposable boot/shoe covers available for visitors is recommended.
  4. Do not purchase birds from sale barns, auctions, or swap meets where birds are allowed to mingle.
  5. Avoid unnecessary exposure: If you still decide to show at fairs and poultry exhibits, you may want to limit the number of birds you bring, and do not bring your most valuable birds, unless you are willing to accept the risk.
  6. Post exhibition cleanliness: Keep all birds that have been shown at fairs, isolated from your other birds for a minimum of 30 days. Ideal isolation would be in a completely separate barn or enclosure located away from your other birds.
  7. Discourage wild waterfowl from your property: Do not feed wildlife or allow them access to your bird’s feed. Consider covering ponds or fencing off water features to prevent your birds from coming into direct contact with wild waterfowl or waterways that may be used by wild waterfowl.
  8. Automobiles: Prior to, and after visiting poultry shows/premises, wash all visible dirt and grime from the automobile and clean out any poultry waste or dirt (bed of truck, trunk etc) paying special notice to wheels and undercarriage. Floor mats can be laundered or sprayed with Lysol.
  9. Watch out for signs of disease: Most importantly watch for increased flock mortality (deaths), as this may be the only sign of an outbreak. See last link for a list of other possible signs of avian influenza.

For further information regarding avian influenza and proper biosecurity, visit:

http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov/

Below is a statement put out by the state veterinarian for Indiana.

http://www.in.gov/boah/files/HPAI_PrepSurvRep_AH-4-28-15(2).pdf

Geoffrey Lossie, D.V.M.

Resident, Poultry Diagnostic Medicine

Purdue University, Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory


A couple of the things that we will be changing this year from previous years, is we will not be allowing any live birds to be brought to the event for sale, swap or trade purposes. Eggs that are being brought for sale, trade or swap purposes will have to be kept in the vehicles and all exchanges will have to be done at the vehicles, and hands will have to be washed/sanatized immediately after exchanges.  While this may seem to be somewhat extreme to some, we are doing this to help protect everyone.
post #40294 of 50224

morning everyone....looks like today is going to be a work day on the coops and such...have a great day

please follow my forum it has been dedicated to my grandfather who inspired me since I was a little boy now I have the motivation to see exactly how far I can go.....

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/940456/building-paradise-for-the-birds

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/beginners-guide-for-the-red-golden-pheasant-pic-heavy-with-mutation-pics

Reply

please follow my forum it has been dedicated to my grandfather who inspired me since I was a little boy now I have the motivation to see exactly how far I can go.....

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/940456/building-paradise-for-the-birds

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/beginners-guide-for-the-red-golden-pheasant-pic-heavy-with-mutation-pics

Reply
post #40295 of 50224
Quote:
Originally Posted by lajohnston View Post

To our Indianapolis BYC'ers - do you know a local veterinarian who treats chickens? I'm hoping I never need one, but would like to know who to call if the need arises.

The only vet in Indy I found that's experienced with chickens is All Wild Things on North Keystone

post #40296 of 50224
Quote:
Originally Posted by minmin1258 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyladyrocks View Post

Okay, now someone MUST design that shirt! I want a "chicken lickin" Indiana BYCers hoodie!
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeacefulWalls View Post

You know you are never going to live this down!  Perhaps next year's T-shirt could be on the theme of "chicken lickin' good!" lol.png

I'd buy one too!
 

 

Out of curiosity, I did a Google search on "Chicken Lickin shirt" because surely someone's already designed one.  Lots of unusual, and pretty tasteless things came up. FYI-I don't recommend trying a google search on those particular terms when your're at work.

post #40297 of 50224
Quote:
Originally Posted by pginsber View Post

Out of curiosity, I did a Google search on "Chicken Lickin shirt" because surely someone's already designed one.  Lots of unusual, and pretty tasteless things came up. FYI-I don't recommend trying a google search on those particular terms when your're at work.
I couldn't resist to google it. I didn't add shirt to search and it wasn't to bad. Seen some good one for a soul food place.
post #40298 of 50224

I have some ideas brewing on this tshirt....  Pondering animated emoticon 

Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

Reply

Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

Reply
post #40299 of 50224

:lau

Quote:

Originally Posted by pginsber View Post
 

 

Out of curiosity, I did a Google search on "Chicken Lickin shirt" because surely someone's already designed one.  Lots of unusual, and pretty tasteless things came up. FYI-I don't recommend trying a google search on those particular terms when your're at work.

post #40300 of 50224

Weekly Chicken Event Post!

 

We have many of the 2015 swap meet and auction dates available on the Indiana BYC'ers Events Calendar! Check for the locations on the Indiana BYC'ers Map! I also have each event linked to it's website/Facebook page for additional show details.

 

Friday, May 1 - Topeka Exotic Animal and Bird Auction

Friday, May 1 - Dinky's Auction Center in Montgomery, Indiana

Saturday, May 2 - Feathered Friends Poultry Club Show in Columbus, IN

Saturday, May 2 - Wolf's Swap Meet​ in Ligonier, IN

Saturday, May 2 - Croy Creek Trader's Fair in Reelsville, IN

Sunday, May 3 - Croy Creek Trader's Fair in Reelsville, IN

 

 

If you do go, try wearing your official Indiana BYC T-shirt and see if you spot anyone else there! Also, please take pictures to share!

 

Front

 

Upcoming Events:

 

Friday, May 8 - Veedersburg Barn Sale in Veedersburg, IN

Friday, May 8 - Dinky's Auction Center in Montgomery, Indiana

Saturday, May 9 - Sandcut Trader's Fair in Terre Haute, Indiana - Facebook Page

Sunday, May 10 - Sandcut Trader's Fair in Terre Haute, Indiana - Facebook Page

 

---

 

Friday, May 15 - Dinky's Auction Center in Montgomery, Indiana

Saturday, May 16 - Croy Creek Trader's Fair in Reelsville, IN

Sunday, May 17 - Croy Creek Trader's Fair in Reelsville, IN

 

---

 

Friday, May 22 - Veedersburg Barn Sale in Veedersburg, IN

Friday, May 22 - Dinky's Auction Center in Montgomery, Indiana

Saturday, May 23 - Sandcut Trader's Fair in Terre Haute, Indiana - Facebook Page

Sunday, May 24 - Sandcut Trader's Fair in Terre Haute, Indiana - Facebook Page

 

---

 

Friday, May 29 - Dinky's Auction Center in Montgomery, Indiana

Saturday, May 30 - Sandcut Trader's Fair in Terre Haute, Indiana - Facebook Page

Sunday, May 31 - Sandcut Trader's Fair in Terre Haute, Indiana - Facebook Page

 

 

**This information does not guarantee the event will happen. Please check the auction or swap meet website/Facebook page to confirm dates/times before you travel!

Connect with friendly Hoosiers, come visit the Indiana thread!

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/730582/indiana-bycers-here

View new member info, helpful links, calendar of events and more!

www.backyardchickens.com/a/indiana-bycers-members-events-links

Help me put together an Everything Egg Cookbook!

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088661/everything-egg-cookbook

 

 

Reply

Connect with friendly Hoosiers, come visit the Indiana thread!

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/730582/indiana-bycers-here

View new member info, helpful links, calendar of events and more!

www.backyardchickens.com/a/indiana-bycers-members-events-links

Help me put together an Everything Egg Cookbook!

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088661/everything-egg-cookbook

 

 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Where am I? Where are you!
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Social › Where am I? Where are you! › INDIANA BYC'ers HERE!