BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Incubating & Hatching Eggs › Getting the flock out of here - a diary of a crazy chicken man
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Getting the flock out of here - a diary of a crazy chicken man - Page 529

post #5281 of 14232
Thread Starter 
A2-AP Agrimectin Pour-On, 250 mL Each $14.95

 

http://www.jefferspet.com/agrimectin-pour-on/camid/LIV/cp/0041084/cn/31002/

 

Orders under $60 will incur a flat $6 Service Charge to cover shipping and handling and orders$60 or more are eligible for Free Economy Shipping. Standard Ground will be available for an additional $4.99 for customers who prefer quicker transit. 

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply
post #5282 of 14232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetpea3829 View Post
 

LOL, ours have survived -15 temps (colder with the wind chill) in an unheated coop and have been just fine.  They don't go outside when its that cold...and when there's snow on the ground.  

Your temperatures over there amaze me. 

I don't know how you and your livestock can survive.

The coldest temp ever recorded here is -4 Celsius.

 

 

xxxxx   M

140 chooks,  10 Boer goats and two dogs.

Breeding poultry for 48 years. Currently breed Araucanas, Silver Laced Wyandottes, 

Light Sussex, Indian Game and Olive Eggers. 

 

Retired and living on a little farm on the edge of the Bunyip State Forest.

 

"May your chooks turn into emus and kick your dunny down."

Reply

140 chooks,  10 Boer goats and two dogs.

Breeding poultry for 48 years. Currently breed Araucanas, Silver Laced Wyandottes, 

Light Sussex, Indian Game and Olive Eggers. 

 

Retired and living on a little farm on the edge of the Bunyip State Forest.

 

"May your chooks turn into emus and kick your dunny down."

Reply
post #5283 of 14232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisher1000 View Post
 


Hey, Oz, before you eat those young males........ I have had many Guineas over the years and they are not like chickens. 

 

Mine tended to pair off and became very attached to each other.  In the spring, the males like to spar and chase each other to compete for the females but once a mate is chosen, they stick together like glue.  It was very sad to see a female, that didn't have a mate, tagging along with a pair.  The male didn't mind, and would service the second female, but if she went broody he would not guard her and her nest.  The Guinea hens tend to go broody according to rank.  They all lay in the same nest, then when there are a bunch of eggs, the top hen will start to sit, and the male will stand guard.  Also, the primary female in a "pair and a spare" group would try viciously to run the other female off, all the time.  Spare males, on the other hand, spent all their time trying to mate with another male's girl, fighting, and chasing each other. 

They would fight and seriously hurt the roosters and also attack and molest the chicken hens.  :ep  I think it is better to have pairs, and maybe just a few extra girls, but don't take my word for it, ask around to be sure.  I ended up with only three males (the hens will make their nests in the wood, or hide them in fields, and will not come in to roost at night.  Something always found them and killed them during the night.  The three males nearly drove me nuts, chasing each other, fighting with the roosters and hens, and screaming constantly, so I decided not to get more.

I kept Guineas for many years and I agree with this advice.

Eventually I ended up with a a flock of males only as the females all 

made secret nests out in the paddock, and all were taken by foxes when they started sitting.

140 chooks,  10 Boer goats and two dogs.

Breeding poultry for 48 years. Currently breed Araucanas, Silver Laced Wyandottes, 

Light Sussex, Indian Game and Olive Eggers. 

 

Retired and living on a little farm on the edge of the Bunyip State Forest.

 

"May your chooks turn into emus and kick your dunny down."

Reply

140 chooks,  10 Boer goats and two dogs.

Breeding poultry for 48 years. Currently breed Araucanas, Silver Laced Wyandottes, 

Light Sussex, Indian Game and Olive Eggers. 

 

Retired and living on a little farm on the edge of the Bunyip State Forest.

 

"May your chooks turn into emus and kick your dunny down."

Reply
post #5284 of 14232

I had very good luck with the method I used, so I will share it.  I found that they imprint on the place they are brooded.  I brooded them in in a large cardboard box in the garage when they were still fuzzy, but moved them, box and all, to the coop as soon as they could be without a lamp.  They were allowed to roam inside the coop but still sleep in the box at night.  Eventually, they started roosting in the rafters above the box, but would still spend time in and on the box until it was flattened by their weight.  Then I started letting them out for an hour or two before dark and they went back to roost on their own.  After that, they would go in to roost as long as the door was open.  If it was accidentally closed, they would roost in the trees outside the coop.  I trained them to fly down from the trees (or roof) by giving the command "Git off tha' ROO-OOF!" then squirting them with the garden hose.  I did this when they started flying up there when they were young.  I didn't want them to poop on the roof because it looks bad.  I was amazed that it worked when they went up into the trees.  I sometimes had to knock them out of the trees with a collapsible survey pole

TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

Rhode Island Reds.                                                Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

Reply

TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

Rhode Island Reds.                                                Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

Reply
post #5285 of 14232

Looks like I may be able to do guineas again this year  I agree about the ratio.......  My flock stays in and will have a net over a large run.

 

deb

Past poultry: Buff Brhama, EE, Barred rock, Wellsummer,

Bantam mixes, Araucana, Turkeys, & Guinea Fowl.

Future poultry:  Guinea Fowl, Sumatra, Wellsummer, Muscovy

"A dream without a plan is just a wish" Katherine Paterson

Regarding the horses in our lives

 

Reply

Past poultry: Buff Brhama, EE, Barred rock, Wellsummer,

Bantam mixes, Araucana, Turkeys, & Guinea Fowl.

Future poultry:  Guinea Fowl, Sumatra, Wellsummer, Muscovy

"A dream without a plan is just a wish" Katherine Paterson

Regarding the horses in our lives

 

Reply
post #5286 of 14232
Thread Starter 

Fun times ahead with Guineas!

 

My parents in law had them for many years in Kabankalan but as no one was there to keep an eye on them, they fell victim to dogs when they were nesting wildly.

 

I hope I can atleast self perpetuate a small flock

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply
post #5287 of 14232
Thread Starter 

So as I am all inspired by the new fruit trees and the garden growing veggies, I spent some down time on the net and ordered a few unusual trees, shrubs, vines and plants with edible components:

 

Carica papaya - Waimanalo Dwarf Papaya 
Cymbopogon winterianus - Citronella Grass 
Harpephyllum caffrum - Kaffir Plum 
Laurus nobilis - Bay Leaf 
lettaria cardamomum - Cardamom 
Muntingia calabura - Strawberry Tree 
Opuntia ficus-indica - Prickly Pear 
Passiflora mollissima - Banana Passion Fruit 
Rollinia deliciosa - Biriba 
Solanum integrifolium - Pumpkin Tree 
Ziziphus mauritiana - Indian Jujube 

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply
post #5288 of 14232
Thread Starter 

for those of you complaining about the cold

 

1326076892-frostbite-abby-yao.jpg

 

you could always move.

 

lots available next to mine...

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply

 ++Egg Shippers Please Read++       Hatching 101 by Sally Sunshine 

 

A wife & 2  kids we ADOPTED in the Phils .  immigrant chooks, all sorts of poultry goats & a water buffalo. 

 

want to help some needy people and have an adventure? - check out "The Chicken Mission

Reply
post #5289 of 14232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashburnham View Post
 

Your temperatures over there amaze me. 

I don't know how you and your livestock can survive.

The coldest temp ever recorded here is -4 Celsius.

 

 

xxxxx   M

 

Just for clarity, we were at -15 F!!!!  Honestly, I don't remember how to convert from F to C so I'm not sure how cold that is in Celsius.  But either way, it's been freaking cold.  

post #5290 of 14232
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozexpat View Post
 

 

lots available next to mine...

If there are lots available next to yours, why not expand?

TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

Rhode Island Reds.                                                Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

Reply

TIN STAR POULTRY - working toward  Standard bred Silver Campines --

Plus, A ragtag gathering of Ameraucanas for blue eggs, Black Copper Marans for dark brown eggs, and a pair of good

Rhode Island Reds.                                                Celebrating the second half of my first century!
 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Incubating & Hatching Eggs
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Incubating & Hatching Eggs › Getting the flock out of here - a diary of a crazy chicken man