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Coryza

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I have some questions about this disease which is going thru my flock now. I have read various information about chicken diseases and I am pretty sure coryza is what my chickens have.

I understand the chickens will always be carriers. I have some chicks which will eventually be integrated into my flock. Will they get this disease even if the rest of the flock is all over it by then and shows no symptoms? And any new birds I may purchase are at risks of "catching" coryza?

What happened in my case was I bought a rooster and two hens from a well known breeder in my area. She seemed to have such excellent bio security measures (asked me to wear clothing and shoes that hadn't been around chickens and sprayed the bottom of my shoes with oxine before entering her chicken area) that I did not quarentine the chickens I got from her. Within a few days the 3 chickens I got from her were sick. None of my chickens, all of whom I have raised from newborn chicks, have ever exhibited any of these coryza like URI symptoms. Now this disease is going thru my flock. One young banty rooster has it really bad, some just have the rattle/throat thing, some are lethargic, some exhibit no symptoms at all. Yes, I am kicking myself now, but it is what it is.

 So far I have been treating with Sulmet, pedia lyte, and starting tylan tomorrow. New experiance for me since I have never given anything an injection before. Am wondering if I should put it in the water for the whole flock too?

Thanks for any help.

post #2 of 9

Infectious Coryza normally has a foul odor about the head area of chickens. If there isnt an odor, you might be dealing with mycoplasma gallisepticum or infectious bronchitis, only bloodwork or necropsy can determine what disease you're dealing with. You can contact your local extension office or state dept of agriculture to find out on how to go about getting a bird tested. Here's a link to respiratory diseases in poultry; you can scroll down and read about the diseases mentioned, symptoms/treatments etc...

Your other option is to cull the sick birds.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044


     Most people have no clue...Forewarned is Forearmed

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     Most people have no clue...Forewarned is Forearmed

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post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawg53 View Post

Infectious Coryza normally has a foul odor about the head area of chickens. If there isnt an odor, you might be dealing with mycoplasma gallisepticum or infectious bronchitis, only bloodwork or necropsy can determine what disease you're dealing with. You can contact your local extension office or state dept of agriculture to find out on how to go about getting a bird tested. Here's a link to respiratory diseases in poultry; you can scroll down and read about the diseases mentioned, symptoms/treatments etc...

Your other option is to cull the sick birds.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044


dawg53 - I saw you on and was hoping you would reply to this post. You have more chicken knowledge than I :)

Happy chickens and honey bees to us all!
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Happy chickens and honey bees to us all!
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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

thanks, I have read that, I have read lots of lists of poultry diseases, along with many many posts on BYC about coryza, URI, and tylan. I am really sure this is what they have, all the symptoms are the same.

However, none of these lists give me answers to my questions. I am already noticing how the different birds are affected from no symptoms what so ever, to "rattle" breathing and general listlessness, to discharge from nose and beak, to eyelids swollen shut. Out of a couple dozen, two roosters were the sickest. One of those recovered with Sulmet and pedia lyte. I made sure he drank. That was before I figured out what it was. The other, a young banty is the most sick with eyes swollen shut and head area by the beak swollen. He has been on Sulmet and pedia lyte too and has been eating. I gave him an injection of tylan this morning. 

I have lots of young chicks coming up and I am worried about them catching it.

Can the disease is passed from hen to chick thru the egg?

Will my chickens get sick again or is it something like chicken pox or measles, once they have it they build up an immunity? I know they've all been exposed because I have not quarentined any of the grown birds, however all the young are in seperate pens.

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsiefly53 View Post

thanks, I have read that, I have read lots of lists of poultry diseases, along with many many posts on BYC about coryza, URI, and tylan. I am really sure this is what they have, all the symptoms are the same.

However, none of these lists give me answers to my questions. I am already noticing how the different birds are affected from no symptoms what so ever, to "rattle" breathing and general listlessness, to discharge from nose and beak, to eyelids swollen shut. Out of a couple dozen, two roosters were the sickest. One of those recovered with Sulmet and pedia lyte. I made sure he drank. That was before I figured out what it was. The other, a young banty is the most sick with eyes swollen shut and head area by the beak swollen. He has been on Sulmet and pedia lyte too and has been eating. I gave him an injection of tylan this morning. 

I have lots of young chicks coming up and I am worried about them catching it.

Can the disease is passed from hen to chick thru the egg?

Will my chickens get sick again or is it something like chicken pox or measles, once they have it they build up an immunity? I know they've all been exposed because I have not quarentined any of the grown birds, however all the young are in seperate pens.

Coryza is not transmitted through eggs. Survivors are carriers of the disease and will spread it when stressed.  There isnt any immunity to the disease. Coryza is easily spread via feeders, waterers, clothing, sneezing birds etc...

If you decide not to cull sick birds, there will come a time that sulmet and antibiotics wont work due to resistance by the disease itself. Then you'll have to purchase other types of antibiotics, most likely more expensive and more powerful, to treat (but not cure) your birds. It's also possible that mycoplasma gallisepticum could be involved in conjunction with coryza. Consider having your sickest bird sent off for necropsy to find out exactly what you're dealing with. You can contact your local extension office or state agriculture department to find out how to go about doing that. Good luck.


     Most people have no clue...Forewarned is Forearmed

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     Most people have no clue...Forewarned is Forearmed

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post #6 of 9

The UC Davis lab will test for mycoplasma if you send them blood.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the information Dawg53. I am just south of you near Daytona.

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

I read up on the mycoplasma gallisepticum. Or CRD. I used some old hay for the bedding i nthe coops and I wonder if they could have gotten a fungal infection from it?

post #9 of 9

what did you end up doing? I have sick ones  now and I am pretty sure this is what they have also

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