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Fermented Feeds - Page 59

post #581 of 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Molpet View Post
 

I didn't like the crumbles at all , pellets were better...... I found a mill an 1 1/2 hr away  that sold organic milled grain that was cheaper and looked like real food.  I do not know where you live, but look for grain mills or  Amish to get good feed that hasn't been processed to death.


Thanks, I am in Southern MA not far from RI.  I'm just not finding anything organic close by.  Organic food from a local mill would be my first choice since who knows how long some of these bags have been sitting around.  And there are no Amish around here.  I was thinking of going with the New Country Organics.  It's so expensive to ship though. I'm hoping at least it will be fairly fresh.  It will come to $50 for 50 lbs.  I'm hoping it goes a long way. 


Edited by Mom2Sav - 11/6/16 at 7:42am
post #582 of 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2Sav View Post
 


Thanks, I am in Southern MA not far from RI.  I'm just not finding anything organic close by.  Organic food from a local mill would be my first choice since who knows how long some of these bags have been sitting around.  And there are no Amish around here.  I was thinking of going with the New Country Organics.  It's so expensive to ship though. I'm hoping at least it will be fairly fresh.  It will come to $50 for 50 lbs.  I'm hoping it goes a long way. 

yeah I do not see anything in the USDA data base by you https://apps.ams.usda.gov/integrity/

are there any Mennonite? It would not be certified but you could ask what they use on it

Hens: 4 Black Jersey giants,  2 BR, 2 ISA ,  ...1 mix roo  ... labor day chicks 3 BJG mix (1 pullet), 1 BO mix pullet .. . Halloween chicks: 2  barred rock mix (1 pullet) and 4 cornish cross mix (1 pullet).... Turkeys: 1 BBB hen ,  4 Narragansett jakes  Yummy.....

1 dog 2 cats

If the hen defends her chicks beneath her wings; how much more shalt thou be safe beneath the wings of God ...

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Hens: 4 Black Jersey giants,  2 BR, 2 ISA ,  ...1 mix roo  ... labor day chicks 3 BJG mix (1 pullet), 1 BO mix pullet .. . Halloween chicks: 2  barred rock mix (1 pullet) and 4 cornish cross mix (1 pullet).... Turkeys: 1 BBB hen ,  4 Narragansett jakes  Yummy.....

1 dog 2 cats

If the hen defends her chicks beneath her wings; how much more shalt thou be safe beneath the wings of God ...

Reply
post #583 of 662
@Mom2Sav

Are you looking at the actual grain bags, or just looking online at ingredient lists. I have found more generic info in the online listings, but if you're looking at the bag at TSC, it should have a better ingredient list and date as well. Hopefully!

My bunch of 7 goes through 50lbs in about 2 months. I do get a 20% protein mix that allows me to add in some oats to stretch, plus treats and yard free range (they love the compost pile)
post #584 of 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by balloonflower View Post

@Mom2Sav

Are you looking at the actual grain bags, or just looking online at ingredient lists. I have found more generic info in the online listings, but if you're looking at the bag at TSC, it should have a better ingredient list and date as well. Hopefully!

My bunch of 7 goes through 50lbs in about 2 months. I do get a 20% protein mix that allows me to add in some oats to stretch, plus treats and yard free range (they love the compost pile)


I was looking online.  So what is the 20% mix called?  On another thread someone said that they felt layer feed was lower quality I think due to the lower protein content.  Should I give them corn in the winter?  So 50lbs in 2 months isn't too bad.  I think we might have up to 10.  I'm not exactly sure how much my neighbor is going to give me.  She is bringing the older chickens to a farm.

post #585 of 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Molpet View Post
 

yeah I do not see anything in the USDA data base by you https://apps.ams.usda.gov/integrity/

are there any Mennonite? It would not be certified but you could ask what they use on it


No there are not any Mennonite that I know of in this area.  :(  I do not need it to be certified.  The more local and fresh the better.

post #586 of 662
Mine is sold as a 20% layer ration, without a specific name. You may have noticed from various threads that names are deceptive, and don't transfer between brands. Layer simply means they add calcium, which is good if your flock is only laying hens as mine is. But you can just make sure you keep oyster shell out if you don't feed layer ration. 16% is simply the minimum protein requirement for health, and as the protein components are generally the most expensive ingredient many feeds/brands stick to the lowest number for cost savings. Many of us prefer a higher percentage and believe it is healthier, but you usually pay for that. Chick starter/grower feed is usually a little higher (18-20%) and mixed/all-flock types vary as well, but generally in that range. Gamebird feeds are usually higher in protein still. Also, fermenting bumps the protein up a couple percent as well. I pick the 20 because I can mix in some whole grains that are lower (10-12%) and still end overall at a good protein level.

I do feed a bit of scratch cracked corn to my bunch as I'm penning them for the night for warmth. The feed I use does contain corn as well. Don't stress too much about what you get to start--you can always change and will be able to make more informed decisions as you learn your flock and how much they eat. It will vary if they range--I've had a couple days recently where they hardly ate their ff, as they had access to our compost pile and filled up there. Days where I keep them to a smaller section of yard they eat more ff.
post #587 of 662

I've been doing FF for just over 3 years now and I started with the small buckets, but as my flock grew to near 60, I had to find another way.  I use a 35 gallon feed drum, filled about 1/2 - 2/3 full.  I started with the Apple Cider Vinegar way back when, but since that first batch, I've never added anything but more feed and more water.  The FF gets stirred in the morning when we start the morning chores.  I'll scoop up some to a hanging bucket with holes in the bottom and let that drain out the excess liquid while I feed the horses.  Then, I'll put that feed in a 1 gallon bucket and fill up all the troughs for the hens.  I only feed in the mornings and I know I got it right when it's all gone by the end of the day.  Lately, I've been adding a bunch of cayenne pepper to the feed to keep the durn squirrels and rats out of the feed during the day!

 

 

post #588 of 662

I have a question that I feel is pretty safe to say hasn't been asked yet: Everyone here says that the feed should smell so-and-so when it is fermenting properly, but what If one doesn't have a sense of smell? I lost mine in a bicycle accident 40 years ago, so unless the smell is really  strong, and I'm talking acetone or menthol strength here, I cannot smell it; sometimes I can smell concentrated ammonia it it's held right under my nose (think: Smelling salts).

 

I think it's safe to say if the FF ever gets that strong its not a good idea to give it to my flock, but is there another way to determine if it is right?

 

Taste is closely related to smell, could I use that instead, like a fingertip to the tongue? And if so what would I be tasting for? If the chickens can gorge on it I doubt it would cause me any harm, but I seriously doubt fermented Flock Raiser would taste anything like sourdough bread.:P

 

And before anyone says it, strangely enough my lack of smell has had no effect on how food tastes, things taste the same to me now as they did before I lost it.

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

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D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

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post #589 of 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWheel View Post
 

I have a question that I feel is pretty safe to say hasn't been asked yet: Everyone here says that the feed should smell so-and-so when it is fermenting properly, but what If one doesn't have a sense of smell? I lost mine in a bicycle accident 40 years ago, so unless the smell is really  strong, and I'm talking acetone or menthol strength here, I cannot smell it; sometimes I can smell concentrated ammonia it it's held right under my nose (think: Smelling salts).

 

I think it's safe to say if the FF ever gets that strong its not a good idea to give it to my flock, but is there another way to determine if it is right?

 

Taste is closely related to smell, could I use that instead, like a fingertip to the tongue? And if so what would I be tasting for? If the chickens can gorge on it I doubt it would cause me any harm, but I seriously doubt fermented Flock Raiser would taste anything like sourdough bread.:P

 

And before anyone says it, strangely enough my lack of smell has had no effect on how food tastes, things taste the same to me now as they did before I lost it.

Loosing the sense of smell is a hardship for sure,  But you are blessed in that it hasn't affected your taste!  What a boring world that would be!  Do you live alone?  If not, you could ask other members of your family to help you out here.  I think I'd simply start a batch, and give it a few days till it's bubbling, and go with that.  You should get to the point where you can anticipate how much feed your flock will use, and simply plan on making that much.  In the summer, I can use a single bucket, mixing as much as they will eat in a single day, and feeding it out the next day.  So, every day, after I feed the flock, I mix the next day's feed.  Even if I mix it in the evening, it's nice and bubbly the next morning.  In the winter, I'm more apt to use 2 buckets:  so each bucket gets about 48 hours, maybe a bit longer before being used/refilled.

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

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Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

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post #590 of 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post
 
Loosing the sense of smell is a hardship for sure,  But you are blessed in that it hasn't affected your taste!  What a boring world that would be!  Do you live alone?  If not, you could ask other members of your family to help you out here.  I think I'd simply start a batch, and give it a few days till it's bubbling, and go with that.  You should get to the point where you can anticipate how much feed your flock will use, and simply plan on making that much.  In the summer, I can use a single bucket, mixing as much as they will eat in a single day, and feeding it out the next day.  So, every day, after I feed the flock, I mix the next day's feed.  Even if I mix it in the evening, it's nice and bubbly the next morning.  In the winter, I'm more apt to use 2 buckets:  so each bucket gets about 48 hours, maybe a bit longer before being used/refilled.

That's what I have been doing, however I would like to be able to determine for myself because one, I really don't want to have to bother them every time I want to check, and two, neither is very knowledgeable about chickens, and not at all about fermenting, so sampling the 'brew' myself is going to be more accurate that relying on someone else's description based on their interpretation of my description. Try and describe the smell of a rose to someone who has never even seen a flower.

 

More than one poster has mentioned their brew was bubbling and visually looked fine, but smelled wrong. For example if a batch were to alcohol ferment rather than lacto-ferment it might look OK, but not be OK. And without being able to smell it I wouldn't know.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by romea View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beekissed View Post
 

 

 

Yep...a long trough.  And no worries about cleaning.  I never clean mine other than scraping excess feed left behind out onto the ground where they snap it up like it's something new. 

 

All ages can get access to a long trough.  Another thing to do is to wait until evening to feed...if they are out in your garden all day, they are eating plenty of things all day and an evening feeding gives a belly full to anyone that doesn't already have one.  It saves on feed and it also causes the birds to be too hungry to think about dominating a feeder, as they have to snatch all they can get to even get some for themselves.  This works.  It will work every day of the year if you just try it.   Mine stay fat and sassy on just one feeding per day, just enough feed in the trough that they can clean it almost all the way up....if too much is left behind that I have to scrape out the leavings the next day, then I just feed less.  My goal is always to have a clean feeder...cleaned up by the chickens, that is.  ;)

 

 

 

 

awesome! thank you for the info, the pics & the encouragement!!

your trough is especially nice... real wood, eh? ;-)) very... ahem... 'tasteful'...

i will do some research on alternative materials as i have no way of making such a beauty. i remember reading that people suggested using gutter but i am not sure i'd like the look of that. after all, it will be sitting in the garden for everyone to see.

 

roughly how long before sunset do you feed the FF?

 

@beekissed: You use fermented feed in a wooden trough? What did you use to seal (waterproof) the wood, and how did you build it without metal screws or nails, as I heard that FF and metal are a no-no? I ask because I do need a bigger trough, and wood and I are old friends.


Edited by FlyWheel - 12/13/16 at 12:26pm

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

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D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

Reply
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