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Advice on removing hatched chicks... - Page 2

post #11 of 18

I use the rubber shelf liner to help with eggs getting knocked around.  I do believe that a pipped egg that gets knocked to the edge and upside down has more trouble hatching.  Sometimes they seem to get stuck to the liner and die.  So my liner is cut smaller that the bator bottom.  This has helped alot.  The extra bator setup as a nursery is an interesting idea.

Southwest Arkansas here. We show - Crele OEGB.  Silver Sebrights.

 

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Southwest Arkansas here. We show - Crele OEGB.  Silver Sebrights.

 

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post #12 of 18

Does anyone here know about quail or debeaking them? I am getting ready to hatch some and I just read bout them having to be debeaked. Is this necessary?

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by misskeeter View Post

smile.png I'd love for a hen to hatch eggs naturally, but I don't see me getting permission to bring a fully grown hen in to my classroom. smile.png

Wow, you sound like a great teacher! I wish we got to hatch eggs in school! I am jealous of your students.

I left the farm but the farm didn't leave me.

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I left the farm but the farm didn't leave me.

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post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanChickenSF View Post


Wow, you sound like a great teacher! I wish we got to hatch eggs in school! I am jealous of your students.

I try to be the kind of teacher I wish I had when I was little. :) It also helps that I'm basically a big kid myself. I have just as much fun with this stuff as they do. :) 

Raising my first two chickens and loving every minute of it! Already trying to figure out when I can move out of the city limits so I can have MORE!

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Raising my first two chickens and loving every minute of it! Already trying to figure out when I can move out of the city limits so I can have MORE!

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post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmGirl01 View Post

I use the rubber shelf liner to help with eggs getting knocked around.  I do believe that a pipped egg that gets knocked to the edge and upside down has more trouble hatching.  Sometimes they seem to get stuck to the liner and die.  So my liner is cut smaller that the bator bottom.  This has helped alot.  The extra bator setup as a nursery is an interesting idea.

I got some of that shelf liner and already put it in the second incubator... I'm trying to match temp and humidity to the hatching bator. 

 

... Should I put liner in the hatching incubator during lockdown or not? I bought little baskets that fit four eggs with room to spare to try to separate the eggs a little bit and avoid some knocking around. ... I just feel like I should be giving these little babies the best chance possible... 

Raising my first two chickens and loving every minute of it! Already trying to figure out when I can move out of the city limits so I can have MORE!

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Raising my first two chickens and loving every minute of it! Already trying to figure out when I can move out of the city limits so I can have MORE!

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post #16 of 18
I use the liner in both the hatcher and bator. I also have baskets, but mine are to keep the chicks separated after hatch so I know the parentage.

Southwest Arkansas here. We show - Crele OEGB.  Silver Sebrights.

 

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Southwest Arkansas here. We show - Crele OEGB.  Silver Sebrights.

 

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post #17 of 18
I've tried both ways.
Removing them as soon as they hatch and placing them into my other incubator and I've left them in and watched them knock all the un-hatched eggs around like its a pinball! 1st way of doing it I had 40 eggs and only 5 didn't hatch. 2nd way 40 eggs and exactly 50% hatched. 20 chicks. So, from then on Ive always removed them as soon as they are free from their egg. And I've always had more success. Once I only had two that didn't hatch. Never more then the five that I mentioned have I lost.
post #18 of 18

I have always removed the empty shells and the chicks as soon as they are dry and put them under a heat lamp. I just don't like how they mess with the pipped eggs. I have almost never experienced any hatching problems due to humidity loss, I think the drying chicks provide a lot of humidity themselves. Doing so all viable chicks hatch and when I check the unhatched eggs, the chicks inside are obvoiusly not developed properly. However, this may not work for everyone; I live near the sea and the air humidity is quite high here.

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