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planting marigolds - Page 3

post #21 of 27

There are different types of marigold.  The French Marigold is, from what i've read, edible.  I don't know about the other types.  One of the rare heirloom seed companies, from where i order, has a number of types of French Marigold, some are 3' x 3' bushes. One of their heirloom French Marigolds is specifically mentioned for color in egg yolks and that is named "Orange Hawaii"(It's one of the big ones). I ordered seed and have some started.  They did a good job of germinating in a shallow starting mix, sowed all together.  I just 'up-potted', singly, into larger go cups, none to gently, and even the smallest showed no sign of droop. Really looking good.  Since we are in zone 3 garden area, i started some early, but will also be attempting to do a row seeded straight into the garden. I'm hoping to get a lot of seed, as i hope to use it as bedding for the chickens and pigeons(wood products give me awful itch) We have forty acres, we could do a field, if they do well, here.

 

 Most of the 'big box' marigolds are dwarf, these days.  


Edited by Zone3Dakota - 4/8/16 at 7:10am

Hubby, kids, grandkids.

pigeons of racing type in the usual bars and checks, plus racing type colorbirds(black, splash, RRed, indigo, dom opal).

Two old retired show cats.

Dominique chickens.

NW North Dakota.  Dang, it's cold here. 

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Hubby, kids, grandkids.

pigeons of racing type in the usual bars and checks, plus racing type colorbirds(black, splash, RRed, indigo, dom opal).

Two old retired show cats.

Dominique chickens.

NW North Dakota.  Dang, it's cold here. 

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post #22 of 27
I have been using marigold seeds passed from my mom to little sister to me. The get up to about 30" tall. I use them in flower beds and garden. Not sure of the strain. I gather 2 - gallon ziplock baggies full of seeds and share with friends & family. Will take pics this year when they start blooming. Does not even come close to the 9' breed.

Enjoyed the thread. Did not know chickens liked them or they were used for yolk coloring. Very interesting.
Wendy High
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Wendy High
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post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendy High View Post

Enjoyed the thread. Did not know chickens liked them or they were used for yolk coloring. Very interesting.

 

Quote:
 Originally Posted by Purdue.edu
 
Marigold (Tagetes erecta L., Asteraceae) is not only grown as an ornamental, cut flower, and landscape plant, but also as a source of pigment for poultry feed. The pigment is added to intensify the yellow color of egg yolks and broiler skin. It is composed of esters of xanthophyll (lutein). Finely ground blossom meal, often enriched with an extract, or the extract itself, usually saponified for better absorption, is added to the feed.

 

You can gain the same benefit (darker yolks) from letting your chickens out on pasture and feeding a feed that contains corn and alfalfa meal.

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Circle-M-Farm View Post


You can gain the same benefit (darker yolks) from letting your chickens out on pasture and feeding a feed that contains corn and alfalfa meal.

Thanks again for info.
goodpost.gif
Wendy High
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Wendy High
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post #25 of 27
I really don’t think I get much if any benefit of the companion planting with French marigolds, let alone the others. I think I’d need to plant a fields of marigolds and plant a few of the veggies I want in with them. Or maybe after the marigolds were well established, plow them under and plant what I wanted to grow in that soil.

I’ve been saving seeds and growing them anyway for many years, mainly because they are pretty. I’m fairly warm here so I can start them outside. I plant them with my corn.

I grow corn in several batches through the summer, starting a new section every two weeks or so for four or five different batches. That way I get corn throughout the summer to eat on plus the amount I plant normally makes one good canning. I plant an 8’ row or corn, move over 12” and plant another 8’ row, move over 30” to give me room to work in there and plant another, then do 12”, 30” 12” until I have eight rows. At least that’s the theory.

Then I sow marigold seeds at the start of those rows and the ends. Two weeks later I plant my next 8’ rows. Then two weeks later I plant another eight short rows, leaving space to transplant marigolds. My garden rows are about 40’ total. When I have marigolds big enough to transplant, either from what I sowed or volunteers, I fill in the gaps to define the ends of each segment. I’ll also put a few at other places in the garden but mainly use zinnias for that.

Those marigolds usually don’t do a lot in the shade of all that corn, but they do grow. After the corn is gone and the sun can hit them, they really blossom. Huge mounds of bright flowers. This photo doesn’t really do it justice in the late fall.



I also feed some marigold flowers in season but especially after they have dried up. It does make a difference in yolk color. When I clean them out of the garden I throw the dried up plants in the run with blossoms attached.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #26 of 27
Ok, I am now going to pull some of my marigolds at the end of season at throw in chicken pen. AND going to take on corn next year. Have never really tried b/c took too much space for yield. But I love the idea of planting one row every two weeks for fresh corn to pick and eat! Fantastic. On next years list for sure. Already know where I am going to plant corn patch & marigolds just like you. Love the idea.

Here's last of seeds from last year. Going to use in newly landscaped flower beds and garden.
Thanks for posting info & pic!
Wendy High
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Wendy High
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post #27 of 27
@wabbit1964




On its way. 3-5 business days, regular mail.

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Wendy High
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