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selling eggs

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Can anyone tell me if there are any laws about selling our extra eggs.

I have a sign in the front yard saying eggs on porch.
It is an honor system.

A friend of mine said that it is illegal for me to sell the eggs without fda approval.

Is there any truth to this?

Thank you Chicken Rich

Father of 4 daughters, 3 Buff Orpingtons, 5 Golden Comet, 2 labradors and a very understanding wife of 20 years.
Leominster, Ma 01453
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Father of 4 daughters, 3 Buff Orpingtons, 5 Golden Comet, 2 labradors and a very understanding wife of 20 years.
Leominster, Ma 01453
Reply
post #2 of 17

It varies by state. In most places, however, you may sell eggs from your own property without a license or health inspection. No FDA involvement.

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Come See the ALL NEW Blue Roo Creations, where every artisan is a veteran or the spouse of a veteran!

BRC Web Store Purchases Now Include Shipping! Or Shop BRC Etsy!

URGENT! Always Quarantine Newly Purchased Birds!
~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 
 

 

 

 

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post #3 of 17

I see lots of references to farm-fresh eggs sold at MA markets, so it must be do-able.  In our state, there is a "cutoff" number of laying hens you can own before your eggs must be USDA graded and inspected, and if you have fewer than that, you may sell your eggs as "farm fresh," but you can't label them as "Grade A" or "large" or any of the USDA labels.  You also have to maintain them in a refrigerated state (something like 40F, I'm not sure), and wash them before placing them in their sale cartons.   There are labeling requirements for the cartons as far as what info must be there.

Arkansas regulations are fairly easy to find, but I didn't have any luck searching for the same thing for Massachusetts, at least in a casual Google search.  I'm sure someone here will be able to point you in the right direction.

http://www.ninjapoodles.com
Working Mom, Wife, Soapmaker, Terrible Gardener, Blogger, Hobby Photographer, Raiser of various animals:
Champion poodles, Arabian horses, 2 useless cats,
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http://www.ninjapoodles.com
Working Mom, Wife, Soapmaker, Terrible Gardener, Blogger, Hobby Photographer, Raiser of various animals:
Champion poodles, Arabian horses, 2 useless cats,
Chickens: Orpingtons, Marans, Ameraucanas and Easter Eggers; Narragansett Turkeys
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post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHICKEN RICH 

Can anyone tell me if there are any laws about selling our extra eggs.

I have a sign in the front yard saying eggs on porch.
It is an honor system.

A friend of mine said that it is illegal for me to sell the eggs without fda approval.

Is there any truth to this?

Thank you Chicken Rich


I agree with Ninjapoodles that is really a state law issue.

I just researched a whole bunch of MA general laws, and I couldn't find a  stand-alone statute that clearly defines you situation as best as I can tell.  I hesitate to include links to what I read because I think it will be confusing, but the gist of what I found is that people who are "transient vendors", meaning people selling things on a non-regular, non-commercial basis, can sell things such as "farm products" they produce themselves as long as they have a permit from their local town.

MA does have several statutes that regulate how eggs are supposed to be graded when they are sold, but it was not clear to me how, or if, that statute applies to people who are transient vendors" selling eggs from their own chickens in a non-commercial setting.

I guess that's not much help, so you might start with your town to see how they address this from a permit perspective.

~Phyllis

P.S. - I used this link to search MA laws, it's the offical sate web site.


Edited by SewingDiva - 8/10/08 at 6:54am
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Im a Gemini Sewing Diva Buddhist Working Mom Striving for Enlightenment.  I  live my life by the 14th Amendment.  Liberal and proud to be an American!  My DH  lives with 6 women:  1 DW, Twin  DD's and  3 Dhens (1 BO, 1 Alorp, 1 EE)
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post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHICKEN RICH 

Can anyone tell me if there are any laws about selling our extra eggs.

I have a sign in the front yard saying eggs on porch.
It is an honor system.

A friend of mine said that it is illegal for me to sell the eggs without fda approval.

Is there any truth to this?

Thank you Chicken Rich


It wouldn't be the FDA, but the USDA has an inspection and grading program administered by the states.  Typically you have to have 3000 birds or more to fall under these requirements.  Don't worry about it...  Use clean cartons and keep the fridge at 40 degs and nobody will have a problem with it.

post #6 of 17

I would just check your state law. The Indiana state egg board says we can sell eggs on the property they are produced without a license....I would need a license if i were to deliver them to retailers or sell at the farmer's market.
I think I'll be trying craigslist first when my hens start to lay.

Good luck!

--Glenda--
Husband, Daughter, Son, Dog, Cat, Blue Ameraucanas, Black Ameraucanas 
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--Glenda--
Husband, Daughter, Son, Dog, Cat, Blue Ameraucanas, Black Ameraucanas 
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post #7 of 17

I live in Maine and just checked this out with the Maine Department of Agriculture's Quality Assurance and Regulations Department. In Maine, producer/sellers of eggs with less than 3,000 laying hens are exempt from state license or inspection.

There are regulations that egg sellers in Maine must follow:

1. The size and grade of the eggs must be labeled on the egg carton along with the name, address, and zip code of the packer. Eggs in carton must match grade, size and color indicated on the label. Cartons must be labeled to state that refrigeration is required. They must be stored and transported at 45 degrees F or less. Empty egg cartons should be stored in clean, dry odorless areas.

2. Eggs should be cleaned of any fecal matter, using a bleach solution of 1 tablespoon of bleach per gallon of warm water and single-use disposable paper towels.

3. Those selling eggs are encouraged to have product liability insurance as a seller's homeowners insurance may not be adequate.

Roomy to 1 hubby, 2 kiddos, 1 kitty, 1 yellow lab, 1 chihuahua, an assortment of poultry, and several goats.

"People who count their chickens before they are hatched act very wisely, because chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them accurately."~ Oscar Wilde

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Roomy to 1 hubby, 2 kiddos, 1 kitty, 1 yellow lab, 1 chihuahua, an assortment of poultry, and several goats.

"People who count their chickens before they are hatched act very wisely, because chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them accurately."~ Oscar Wilde

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post #8 of 17

In Mass, in order to sell eggs, your chickens must be tested for avian flu, and salmonella. I will post the telephone number tomorrow. The testing is free, and you are given a certificate. This must be done yearly.

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by reallyluvschickens 

In Mass, in order to sell eggs, your chickens must be tested for avian flu, and salmonella. I will post the telephone number tomorrow. The testing is free, and you are given a certificate. This must be done yearly.


Well, this thread is three years old...

Those sound like requirements for hatching eggs and live birds.

Here is a link for backyard producers that doesn't get too involved in actual regulation, but it sounds like direct marketing from the premises is fairly simple:

http://www.mass.gov/agr/animalhealth/poultry/docs/Safe-Egg-Handling-for-Backyard-Egg-Producers.pdf

post #10 of 17

what are the laws for Arkansas, or tell me where I can find them

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