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Hens attacking rooster - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Definitely a rooster smile.png had them in the run today and the hens went back into the coop to lay eggs and George attempted his first crow.
post #12 of 15
Too cute. I didn't think he was that young from the photo either. Hopefully a bit more maturity and by the sound of it some singing lessons and all will be peaceful :-)

Aussie Mum to
our sizzle Al

our neurotic Partridge Silkie Penny

and our sweethearts the Salmon Favorelles girls, Colonel , Winry & Carl
And our big girls the Australorps, Pepper, Blackie and Tonio

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Aussie Mum to
our sizzle Al

our neurotic Partridge Silkie Penny

and our sweethearts the Salmon Favorelles girls, Colonel , Winry & Carl
And our big girls the Australorps, Pepper, Blackie and Tonio

Reply
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

He doesn’t have spurs. He has not developed enough to look much like a rooster. His comb and wattles are not very much developed. He is just starting to get the pointy saddle and hackle feathers. The adult chickens are picking on him.

He is very young. From that photo I’d guess a bit over 4 months old. He has not yet reached a level of maturity to stand up to the others. Chickens are bullies. Mature chickens outrank immature chickens. Mature chickens often pick on immature chickens.

Mature hens often will not have anything to do with a young rooster until he has matured enough to WOW! them with his magnificence and learned to do all the things a good rooster does for his ladies; dance, find them food, watch for predators, break up fights, and just be totally in charge. He doesn’t have the self-confidence and maturity to do those things yet. Mature hen swill pick on pullets too, but they seem to really enjoy picking on young roosters while they can.

You are also going through what is called integration. That’s where you put chickens together that are not used to each other. They have to sort out a pecking order, which can be fairly violent. They also are determining flock dominance. That’s a bit difference than pecking order. Eventually that cockerel will mature enough to take on that role, but he has to mature enough to do that. Right now those hens are letting him know he is NOT the boss.

If they are drawing blood when they peck him, I suggest you separate them until he heals. If at all possible house him next to them where they can see each other but not get at each other. If they are not drawing blood, I’d just let them go. They will eventually work it out.

As far as breed, he sure looks like a mutt to me. That’s a cross between two or more breeds.

Then it could be a hen, like they said. It has that general appearance but I think I see saddle and hackle feathers. But why would the other roosters at the RSPCA be attacking it instead of mating it?

Also, that coloring looks like I would expect on a rooster, not a hen. I still go with a cockerel.

 

Thank you for the information, really helpful! I'm in the same situation...lost my rooster from a racoon breaking in. The hens survived because the roo did his job so well...but was killed in the battle. I was given this rooster...he's big but tail feathers are just growing, his crow is still akward so I'm thinking he's 4-5 months. The hens want nothing to do with him, because his new, but also as you described, he's not taking control but just taking a beating. The hens just went through an adjustment period since my roo died, fighting  as before the roo was making everyone get along. They sure don't want a new young cockerel around! I'm putting him in with them at night and in the day separating him in a pen beside them (they can hear and see each other through the dividers) as they are HAMMERING on him...and he just hides in corners and takes the beating.

I tried putting him with younger chickens I hatched out in May...but even my 10 week old bantam pint-size of attitude cockerel was chasing him off!!!


How long could it take for this soft little cockerel to become a confidant rooster? In the past when I've integrated a rooster, I guess they've always been matured and the hens always respected the roo right away...not fighting, more like crouching down right away to get mated tongue.png

 

 

post #14 of 15
I'm guessing that once his tail comes in and he sorts his crowing gear out, the hens will have a new found respect their man.
post #15 of 15

yes he will just be fating up:bun

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