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cornish X Rock genetics

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Can somebody please educate me as to the true history of the cornish X rocks?  I've seen contradictory remarks in other posts and I'm curious as I've currently got a flock free ranging.  Frankenfood? 

Thanks

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30 Dark Cornish cockerels and pullets, 1 Rose Comb Brown Leghorn rooster and hen, 1 Dominique Rooster, 2 whippets.  More soon come.
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30 Dark Cornish cockerels and pullets, 1 Rose Comb Brown Leghorn rooster and hen, 1 Dominique Rooster, 2 whippets.  More soon come.
Reply
post #2 of 14

Not sure what you want to know about them.

This meat bird is a cross from a white cornish rooster and a white rock hen.

The commercial and hatchery chicks  that are cornish cross rocks are  fast growing meat birds. Commercial chickens of this variety are bred to be at butcher weight in 5 - 6 weeks. The hatchery version is generally ready in 8 - 10 weeks.

There are other meat birds being developed or that have been developed but they do not grow like these commercialized birds.

Trying to raise these birds to breed isn't a good idea as they don't breed true - meaning you won't get chicks like the parents.

LF Blue/Black/Splash Orpingtons - Appleyard Ducks - Geese - Bronze Turkeys - Dairy Goats - Fiber Sheep + eleventy hundred more animals
My Etsy Shop
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LF Blue/Black/Splash Orpingtons - Appleyard Ducks - Geese - Bronze Turkeys - Dairy Goats - Fiber Sheep + eleventy hundred more animals
My Etsy Shop
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post #3 of 14

The "Cornish Rock" or "Cornish X" that we purchase from the various hatcheries are NOT the F1 offspring of a Cornish rooster on a White Rock hen.  Rather they are the offspring of highly selected breeding stock that have been selected for growth, efficiency, and meat yield.  The hatcheries purchase eggs or breeding stock from the large commercial operations such as Cobb-Vantress, Hubbard, and others for their broiler chicks.

Jim

Husband, Father, Livestock Nutritionist, Farmer
 

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Husband, Father, Livestock Nutritionist, Farmer
 

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post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thank you Jim.  This response gets closer to answer I was looking for as I know they are cornish x rock but how the stock is selected I think matters.  Is there any possibility that somewhere along the line there has been any genetic modification or can we be insured that these birds are just merely the result of selection.  The birds I have are from McMurrary Hatchery.

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30 Dark Cornish cockerels and pullets, 1 Rose Comb Brown Leghorn rooster and hen, 1 Dominique Rooster, 2 whippets.  More soon come.
Reply
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30 Dark Cornish cockerels and pullets, 1 Rose Comb Brown Leghorn rooster and hen, 1 Dominique Rooster, 2 whippets.  More soon come.
Reply
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sosanista 

Is there any possibility that somewhere along the line there has been any genetic modification or can we be insured that these birds are just merely the result of selection.  The birds I have are from McMurrary Hatchery.


All livestock used in commercial production in the USA are the result of natural selection, there are not Genetic Modification methods used to change their genetic makeup. 

The GMO people talk about are in plants.

Calling commercial broilers "Cornish x Rock" is inaccurate since the parent stock have been highly selected.  The term is a vestige from many years ago and doesn't not describe the broilers we purchase from hatcheries.

Jim

Husband, Father, Livestock Nutritionist, Farmer
 

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Husband, Father, Livestock Nutritionist, Farmer
 

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post #6 of 14

The "Rock" and "Cornish" use as sire and dame look little or nothing like the purebreds we get in the backyard.  Here is ATTRA's good explanation of it:

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/PDF/poultry_genetics.pdf#xml=http://search.ncat.org/texis/search/pdfhi.txt?query=pastured+poultry+genetics&pr=ATTRAv2&prox=page&rorder=500&rprox=500&rdfreq=500&rwfreq=500&rlead=500&rdepth=0&sufs=0&order=r&cq=&id=48a553f47

Also, if Cornish Crosses sit wrong with you (as they do me), there are some great alternatives.  The colored range broilers from JM are fantastic birds.

post #7 of 14

greyfields' link for

Quote:
Originally Posted by greyfields 

... ATTRA's good explanation...


is no more valid. I believe that the new URLs are as follows:

Download page with brief info

HTML page version of the document

Direct link to the PDF file


Edited by marenostrum - 11/7/11 at 11:15pm
post #8 of 14

I find it interesting that everyone "knows" there is little to no cornish or rock blood in the current cornish X yet no one knows what breeds ARE in there. Just saying. Though it's probably safe to say that the cornish and rocks available today from hatcheries (since most of their bloodlines are impure anyway) carry none of the blood of those birds, still, it makes me wonder.

ETA: I understand completely that a person trying to come up with something close to a "cornish x" is likely doomed to failure since the current breeds used have been worked on and culled for over 50 years. I just question the common "knowledge" that there isn't any cornish in there.


Edited by galanie - 11/8/11 at 4:18am

Lay down with dogs and you get up with fleas.


Love those Orps!

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Lay down with dogs and you get up with fleas.


Love those Orps!

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post #9 of 14
post #10 of 14

While a side note, yet applicable, it is similar to the laying hens of the genetics conglomerate, ISA-Bovan-Shaver-Hubbard- et al.  This 6 or 7 company conglomerate selectively breeds layers as well as meat birds.  The ISA, for example, is now the result of over 30 years of hybridization.  The grand parent stock that makes the parent stock that makes the ISA is even patented, IIRC.

Whenever I see someone say an ISA is merely a red sexlink with White RIR over RIR, I cringe a bit. Similar to the CornishX, there is far more to the story.

 

 

Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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