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Training/Teaching a dog about chickens - Page 11

post #101 of 185

I don't have an issue with people who use corrective collars, as long as they're being used properly. My issue is with people who slap things like that on a dog, yank as hard as they can, or turn the level on the shock collar all the way up.

 

That said, they aren't for me. My dog's on a well-fitted harness - when he's even wearing anything - and I don't use physical or verbal corrections. It's just easier for me, and matches me more than anything else I've tried.

post #102 of 185

I have 3 dogs: 1 rough collie, 1 purebred lab and 1 borador (lab/border collie cross).

 

The collie used to chase the chickens just for fun, that's because she was just a puppy when I got the chickens. But I spent a few weeks training her to leave them alone and she learned it.

 

The lab is a different story.... Fist time he saw the chickens, it went into automatic drooling mode!!! And that's what he does every time he sees a chicken, it's sad. He came from a line of champion bird hunters, but he's far from having a soft mouth.

 

My borador is a rescue, so she might even have some pit in her (who knows...). She's smart enough to seem disinterested on the chickens when we are around, but very into them and we're "not looking".

 

So far I caught the lab with 1 dead turkey and 2 chickens. The borador is always around when tit happens, while the collie is always by the house and shows no signs of being interested on the killings.

 

They are all extremely obedient (with the exception of my defiant rough collie, but she's the one I don't have to worry about when it comes to chickens), so I might give it a shot on the "leave it" - they know very well what that means.

 

I guess I'll have my hands full with my "chicken winter project": teaching my labs to not chase / kill my poultry. This will be fun..... NOT!   :lau

post #103 of 185
Thread Starter 

Wow...I've been away from BYC for a few days traveling for business and I get back on to see 8 more pages on my innocent question about dog training. :ep I am thankful for all the suggestions and tips/tricks.  I will take this information and process it to decide how to best approach disciplined training with my two dogs.  Thanks again!

Lucas

post #104 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Apple View Post
 


Most chickens are. It is best to keep them separate. All dogs will chase things that make noise and move quickly.Will 

Will the dog attack the Pullets? She's a Border Collie/ Husky mix.

4/4 chickens laying! 100%. We've gotten 3 eggs in one day. Hoping for 4!
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4/4 chickens laying! 100%. We've gotten 3 eggs in one day. Hoping for 4!
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post #105 of 185
My dog is helpful rather than harmful with my chickens and our cat doesn't mess with them either, she's a "scaredy cat!" It's kinda funny!
I just got some Seramas and I've had them inside, and loose at times. My Maycee just sniffs them and watches them and Luna (cat) keeps her distance while observing. When one gets close she runs into the bedroom.
The only problem I have with my dog is she is jealous. She wines when one of them sits on me when I'm on the sofa. We are one happy little family living in harmony.

No Ordinary Girl

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No Ordinary Girl

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post #106 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombified View Post
 

I don't have an issue with people who use corrective collars, as long as they're being used properly. My issue is with people who slap things like that on a dog, yank as hard as they can, or turn the level on the shock collar all the way up.

 

That said, they aren't for me. My dog's on a well-fitted harness - when he's even wearing anything - and I don't use physical or verbal corrections. It's just easier for me, and matches me more than anything else I've tried.

i like you approach.......its similar to mine.  My 2 dogs walk by my side with no lead perfectly, and never have worn a collar of any sort.  I have never had to 'train' them to even do that.  They know i have pieces of sausages with me on walks, so they are keep to stay near me lol.

 

For people who say these collars are humane ... they need to think if they would use them on their young children to train them not to run away.  I am sure if I used it on my kids I would end up in serious trouble (and rightly so).  

post #107 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by jak2002003 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombified View Post
 

I don't have an issue with people who use corrective collars, as long as they're being used properly. My issue is with people who slap things like that on a dog, yank as hard as they can, or turn the level on the shock collar all the way up.

 

That said, they aren't for me. My dog's on a well-fitted harness - when he's even wearing anything - and I don't use physical or verbal corrections. It's just easier for me, and matches me more than anything else I've tried.

i like you approach.......its similar to mine.  My 2 dogs walk by my side with no lead perfectly, and never have worn a collar of any sort.  I have never had to 'train' them to even do that.  They know i have pieces of sausages with me on walks, so they are keep to stay near me lol.

 

For people who say these collars are humane ... they need to think if they would use them on their young children to train them not to run away.  I am sure if I used it on my kids I would end up in serious trouble (and rightly so).  

It is not the same thing. It is not inhumane to use the E-collar. Most now are made with vibration mode. Most dog trainers are now using them as a tool to train off leash dogs. It is no different then someone tapping your shoulder to get your attention. I am the one the used my all the way up to train my Pyr not to kill my birds. I only had to do it 2 times at that level of correction. My Pyr has a double coat and is not affected by the collar to this day and she DOES NOT go after my birds in fact when I tell her to "Leave it" she calmly walks, with tail wagging over to me. As for you to walking your dogs with no leash, you may be asking for trouble, another dog could come up and try to start a fight with yours and you wouldn't have a collar or leash to control the problem. I see many dogs on our walks, in my Amish neighborhood, none of them are in fences or on a tie out, they come out to the street barking and carrying on, I have total control of my dogs and we can then continue walking (no E-collar) and they know I am in control of the situation.

 

(Where the E-collar is involved I was trained to use it by a reputable dog trainer)

 

 

  

 

 

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post #108 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstricer View Post
 

It is not the same thing. It is not inhumane to use the E-collar. Most now are made with vibration mode. Most dog trainers are now using them as a tool to train off leash dogs. It is no different then someone tapping your shoulder to get your attention. I am the one the used my all the way up to train my Pyr not to kill my birds. I only had to do it 2 times at that level of correction. My Pyr has a double coat and is not affected by the collar to this day and she DOES NOT go after my birds in fact when I tell her to "Leave it" she calmly walks, with tail wagging over to me. As for you to walking your dogs with no leash, you may be asking for trouble, another dog could come up and try to start a fight with yours and you wouldn't have a collar or leash to control the problem. I see many dogs on our walks, in my Amish neighborhood, none of them are in fences or on a tie out, they come out to the street barking and carrying on, I have total control of my dogs and we can then continue walking (no E-collar) and they know I am in control of the situation.

 

(Where the E-collar is involved I was trained to use it by a reputable dog trainer)

I have to agree with you. I walk my dog on a leash at the public park and we STILL got attacked by another dog who wasn't on a leash. Being that my dog is a pitbull and carrys a strong reputation with them people are going to blame her first and ask questions later. I desparately wish that I could walk her off leash, but even at our home, we live on fifty plus acres of woods, there are still things like porcupines and such that my husband is always warning me to keep her on her leash..

My family consists of my extremely patient husband, a much loved pitbull terrier, two American Game hens, a splash Polish crested hen, two white Bantam Cochin girls, a Bantam Gold Laced Cochin hen, her three beautiful brothers, 9 Guinea Fowl, and as of last week four brand new Cochin chick
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My family consists of my extremely patient husband, a much loved pitbull terrier, two American Game hens, a splash Polish crested hen, two white Bantam Cochin girls, a Bantam Gold Laced Cochin hen, her three beautiful brothers, 9 Guinea Fowl, and as of last week four brand new Cochin chick
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post #109 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tacampbell1973 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstricer View Post
 

It is not the same thing. It is not inhumane to use the E-collar. Most now are made with vibration mode. Most dog trainers are now using them as a tool to train off leash dogs. It is no different then someone tapping your shoulder to get your attention. I am the one the used my all the way up to train my Pyr not to kill my birds. I only had to do it 2 times at that level of correction. My Pyr has a double coat and is not affected by the collar to this day and she DOES NOT go after my birds in fact when I tell her to "Leave it" she calmly walks, with tail wagging over to me. As for you to walking your dogs with no leash, you may be asking for trouble, another dog could come up and try to start a fight with yours and you wouldn't have a collar or leash to control the problem. I see many dogs on our walks, in my Amish neighborhood, none of them are in fences or on a tie out, they come out to the street barking and carrying on, I have total control of my dogs and we can then continue walking (no E-collar) and they know I am in control of the situation.

 

(Where the E-collar is involved I was trained to use it by a reputable dog trainer)

I have to agree with you. I walk my dog on a leash at the public park and we STILL got attacked by another dog who wasn't on a leash. Being that my dog is a pitbull and carrys a strong reputation with them people are going to blame her first and ask questions later. I desparately wish that I could walk her off leash, but even at our home, we live on fifty plus acres of woods, there are still things like porcupines and such that my husband is always warning me to keep her on her leash..

Thank you I have a pit/lab mix, a border/collie mix and a Pyr. of the three the broder mix acts like cojo at times, he was the first we trained to E-collar as he wanted to eat the Pyr which could have been dangerous to him later, they are now the best of friends

 

 

  

 

 

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post #110 of 185
Being taught right from a puppy is probably the most reliable means. But dogs have a natural prey drive. You're asking a lot of a high drive dog to leave fluttering, darting objects alone when you're not present.

I have a 3 dogs. One will let the chickens walk on her back and peck her fur...doesn't bat an eye. But I left her and the small dog alone for 4 hours while chickens were out and someone got bored. One less chicken. (Small dog avoids the chickens) Did some training, and I do leave her with them again but not for long periods of time. Too tempting. Corrective collars are fine, used properly, but smart and independent dogs can figure out whether you're there and watching them. I would never trust my other dog. She is clearly keen to get a mouthful of feathers. She's a hunting dog and you can't beat that drive out of them, nor should you. You wouldn't punish a cougar for killing a deer. The chickens free range for 3-4 hours a day. During that time, the dog is in the house or the dog run.

The original poster's dogs are cattle dogs (bred to chase and herd and nip), and willing to "work" independently. It's nature... tongue.png
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