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The most cost-effective chicken moat - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Vicki you may have noticed this is an old thread. Nothing wrong with that. That’s why old threads are available.

Your plan doesn’t sound that bad but I suggest the first good fence you build is the outside fence. Use 2x4 welded wire, maybe with rabbit wire along the bottom and electrify the fence. Call Premiere Fencing and talk to them about that. They are pretty helpful, that’s their business. Talk to them about how to wire your gates too. You’re right, gates can be the weak point. You might consider putting in a sill, say a 4”x6” timber to butt the gate against at the bottom.

Once you have the outside secured, all you need to do is keep your chickens in. Chicken wire can work for that quite well and it is cheap. Just make the moat tall enough so you can walk in there. Unless you have a pretty high chicken density they will not eat all the green stuff in there. They’ll eat the stuff they like and let the other stuff grow. You’ll probably need to get in there to mow or weed-eat two or three times a year.

Deer can jump high or they can jump wide. They don’t do both. So a reasonably high fence you can walk under with another one inside makes a good deer fence.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

Vicki you may have noticed this is an old thread. Nothing wrong with that. That’s why old threads are available.

Your plan doesn’t sound that bad but I suggest the first good fence you build is the outside fence. Use 2x4 welded wire, maybe with rabbit wire along the bottom and electrify the fence. Call Premiere Fencing and talk to them about that. They are pretty helpful, that’s their business. Talk to them about how to wire your gates too. You’re right, gates can be the weak point. You might consider putting in a sill, say a 4”x6” timber to butt the gate against at the bottom.

Once you have the outside secured, all you need to do is keep your chickens in. Chicken wire can work for that quite well and it is cheap. Just make the moat tall enough so you can walk in there. Unless you have a pretty high chicken density they will not eat all the green stuff in there. They’ll eat the stuff they like and let the other stuff grow. You’ll probably need to get in there to mow or weed-eat two or three times a year.

Deer can jump high or they can jump wide. They don’t do both. So a reasonably high fence you can walk under with another one inside makes a good deer fence.

Great advice from RR.

Agrees, outer fence first.

 

Also 'rabbit wire' doesn't need to be 1/4" x 1/4".....

....1" x 2" welded wire would serve better, 24" up and 18" out and buried a couple inches for mowing clearance.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #13 of 17

We have a 42' by 50' raised bed garden with a 4' fence around it presently. We are getting chickens next year and are taking a year to prepare the coop/run/moat first.

 

It was my thought cost-wise to place the coop to the bottom center of the garden and run two 4' by 60' runs to the left and right of the garden. (encircle it except the main garden gate) Which will take two gates from the coop into the runs.

 

We can build them one at a time, which is more convenient for us cost-wise. Also, once they are both completed I can gate one off and plant peas to trellis up it and a cover crop on the ground for the ladies to eat. Then switch which run I let them into plant a new crop on the one they have eaten away and once it is grown switch them again.

 

This way my chickens are effectively eating garden pests, keeping animals out, clearing any weeds that get too close to my beds, we are supplementing their diets with good food, and really earning their keep!

3 Buff Orpington hens named Chocobo, Pikachu and Midge. 1 Buff Orpington Rooster. 3 Barred Rocks named Puff, Pebbles and Silver  1 18 yr. old German Shorthaired Pointer named Orion (passed 5/2016), 2 cats named Not and Beta. 4 Langstroth bee hives and 1 top bar bee hive. 
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3 Buff Orpington hens named Chocobo, Pikachu and Midge. 1 Buff Orpington Rooster. 3 Barred Rocks named Puff, Pebbles and Silver  1 18 yr. old German Shorthaired Pointer named Orion (passed 5/2016), 2 cats named Not and Beta. 4 Langstroth bee hives and 1 top bar bee hive. 
Reply
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serenashome View Post
 

We have a 42' by 50' raised bed garden with a 4' fence around it presently. We are getting chickens next year and are taking a year to prepare the coop/run/moat first.

 

It was my thought cost-wise to place the coop to the bottom center of the garden and run two 4' by 60' runs to the left and right of the garden. (encircle it except the main garden gate) Which will take two gates from the coop into the runs.

 

We can build them one at a time, which is more convenient for us cost-wise. Also, once they are both completed I can gate one off and plant peas to trellis up it and a cover crop on the ground for the ladies to eat. Then switch which run I let them into plant a new crop on the one they have eaten away and once it is grown switch them again.

 

This way my chickens are effectively eating garden pests, keeping animals out, clearing any weeds that get too close to my beds, we are supplementing their diets with good food, and really earning their keep!

Welcome to BYC.....that sounds like a great plan!

Would love it if you started a thread with your building progress.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #15 of 17

I can do that :) I'll go snap some pictures once the weather here clears a bit.

3 Buff Orpington hens named Chocobo, Pikachu and Midge. 1 Buff Orpington Rooster. 3 Barred Rocks named Puff, Pebbles and Silver  1 18 yr. old German Shorthaired Pointer named Orion (passed 5/2016), 2 cats named Not and Beta. 4 Langstroth bee hives and 1 top bar bee hive. 
Reply
3 Buff Orpington hens named Chocobo, Pikachu and Midge. 1 Buff Orpington Rooster. 3 Barred Rocks named Puff, Pebbles and Silver  1 18 yr. old German Shorthaired Pointer named Orion (passed 5/2016), 2 cats named Not and Beta. 4 Langstroth bee hives and 1 top bar bee hive. 
Reply
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serenashome View Post
 

I can do that :) I'll go snap some pictures once the weather here clears a bit.

Great! Link your new thread here so we can find it.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #17 of 17
3 Buff Orpington hens named Chocobo, Pikachu and Midge. 1 Buff Orpington Rooster. 3 Barred Rocks named Puff, Pebbles and Silver  1 18 yr. old German Shorthaired Pointer named Orion (passed 5/2016), 2 cats named Not and Beta. 4 Langstroth bee hives and 1 top bar bee hive. 
Reply
3 Buff Orpington hens named Chocobo, Pikachu and Midge. 1 Buff Orpington Rooster. 3 Barred Rocks named Puff, Pebbles and Silver  1 18 yr. old German Shorthaired Pointer named Orion (passed 5/2016), 2 cats named Not and Beta. 4 Langstroth bee hives and 1 top bar bee hive. 
Reply
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