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Discoloured feet ---not an emergency - Page 2

post #11 of 14

I don't know of any fungus infections in chickens' feet.  Fungal infections are more common on combs and wattles or internally.  I really wouldn't do anything for this.  I have old fashioned Rhode Island reds who have this coloring.  Most hatchery chickens have different breeds in their backgrounds, so I really wouldn't be concerned.  Since it is on both feet pretty equally I would say it is natural coloring.  It probably isn't desired coloring for showing, but he is still good looking.

post #12 of 14

@Eggcessive Foot fungus is actually pretty common with chickens that are housed in areas with wet floors, wet hay, damp outside areas, direct contact with the fungus itself, and even contact with other chickens who are infected. While some of the infections can occur on the top of the foot and up the legs, they are more commonly found on the bottom of the foot on the main pad where the toes connect. Picture

Above I posted a fungal infection that was found on a chickens foot pad. There's more information here: http://chickenheavenonearth.weebly.com/how-to-treat-fungal-foot-infections.html

23 Golden Comets, 5 White Leghorns, 2 Light Sussexs, 4 Black Astrolorps, 1 Golden Laced Wynadotte, 3 Runner Ducks, 2 Silkies, 3 Andalusian Mixes, 1 Game Mix, 1 Black Sex Link, 1 Golden Lace Wynadotte Mix, 1 Black Astrolorp Mix, 1 Bantam Partridge Brahma, and 10 Easter Egger Mixes!
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23 Golden Comets, 5 White Leghorns, 2 Light Sussexs, 4 Black Astrolorps, 1 Golden Laced Wynadotte, 3 Runner Ducks, 2 Silkies, 3 Andalusian Mixes, 1 Game Mix, 1 Black Sex Link, 1 Golden Lace Wynadotte Mix, 1 Black Astrolorp Mix, 1 Bantam Partridge Brahma, and 10 Easter Egger Mixes!
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post #13 of 14

Red, irritated skin on the feet could be an indication of moisture and ammonia from droppings burning the skin and can eventually cause problems like bumblefoot. Cleaning out the coop regularly and providing good ventilation is important as well as plenty of space. Sanded roosts with no splinters is helpful too. From the looks of the picture provided, I'd ditch the straw as floor litter and go with pine shavings. Pine shavings are more absorbent and keep the floor drier. Use a thick layer about 6-8" over the floor area of the coop. A thick layer on the floor and roosts not placed too high is best for heavier breeds hopping off the roosts regularly.


Edited by Michael Apple - 11/30/13 at 8:22am

The Status Quo always sucks!

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The Status Quo always sucks!

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post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm just following up to say that it was a natural discolouration--nothing sinister smile.png
The picture does look like his toes are red inbetween but I think his hormones were just kicking in. That happens with the white feet.
I rubbed olive oil with oregano oil on his feet for days with no change. I'm sure he must have thought I was preparing to eat him smile.png
Then I read about a breeders experience with foot discolouration that was remedied by switching the type of feed. So I switched the feed and within a few months the colour faded.
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