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BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT. - Page 1012

post #10111 of 11315
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertChic View Post
 

 

None of my NNs have had that kind of fat...only my Bielefelders and this guy. Notice how narrow his frame was? My hand is fairly thin and very flexible and I could barely reach into this dude! I sure hope his offspring develop a wider frame. 

Dorkings and dorking crosses will get fat on them.

Ron

 

Is this a Hobby or a way of Life?

 

BYC Family needs help! https://www.gofundme.com/2aj5phjg

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Ron

 

Is this a Hobby or a way of Life?

 

BYC Family needs help! https://www.gofundme.com/2aj5phjg

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post #10112 of 11315
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronott1 View Post
 

Dorkings and dorking crosses will get fat on them.

 

Well, that Dorking blood did its job then. Thankfully his off-spring are mixed with other breeds too, so maybe I can diminish the fat content at least a little. Don't get me wrong...he was delicious, but that was an insane amount of fat. 

post #10113 of 11315

Well, going to use a cornish X hen with a rhodebar roo. The cornish X is 4 weeks old and I am trying to keeo them small but they just keep growing everytime I give them feed. This fall we will see how they do. Guessing they will go in the roaster before the project starts. We will see.

post #10114 of 11315

Stryker you should get some very nice birds from that cross, I hope some of your Cornish cross hens mature!

post #10115 of 11315

About fat "rolls": I see nice layers of fat in the late autumn and in the first half of spring, but over summer when temps are high I've not seen as much fat on birds I've slaughtered.  I think temp has a bit to do with it, as in they put on the layer of insulation for cooler weather, and run it off in warmer.

Starting up a GLW project, hatching the F1 generation http://sandghomesteade.blogspot.com

Learning caponizing

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Starting up a GLW project, hatching the F1 generation http://sandghomesteade.blogspot.com

Learning caponizing

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post #10116 of 11315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfr1973 View Post

About fat "rolls": I see nice layers of fat in the late autumn and in the first half of spring, but over summer when temps are high I've not seen as much fat on birds I've slaughtered.  I think temp has a bit to do with it, as in they put on the layer of insulation for cooler weather, and run it off in warmer.

When the temperature gets hot, chickens cut back on eating and egg laying suffers as well. They'll use up those body reserves at that time. Once temperatures drop in the fall, appetites return and fat accumulates once again.

"Experince is the teacher of all things." Julius Ceaser

"The only real valuable thing is intuition." Albert Einstein

"Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest" Mark Twain

 

My Coop Project

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/656727/coop-project-maken-the-plunge-getting-chickens

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"Experince is the teacher of all things." Julius Ceaser

"The only real valuable thing is intuition." Albert Einstein

"Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest" Mark Twain

 

My Coop Project

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/656727/coop-project-maken-the-plunge-getting-chickens

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post #10117 of 11315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfr1973 View Post
 

About fat "rolls": I see nice layers of fat in the late autumn and in the first half of spring, but over summer when temps are high I've not seen as much fat on birds I've slaughtered.  I think temp has a bit to do with it, as in they put on the layer of insulation for cooler weather, and run it off in warmer.

 

Normally I would agree but I don't think that tendency is nearly as pervasive out here in the desert. We've had maybe a total of two weeks of temps in the 50s-60s since last November with most days registering 80 or above, and have been above 85 for at least the past two months. In this case I really think it was just this bird's genetics. 

 

I've also noticed that irrespective of when I've culled them, any of my birds with Bielefelder blood tend to be much fattier than my other breeds. I'm convinced that's part of the reason for their difficulty in the heat. 

post #10118 of 11315
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertChic View Post

 

Normally I would agree but I don't think that tendency is nearly as pervasive out here in the desert. We've had maybe a total of two weeks of temps in the 50s-60s since last November with most days registering 80 or above, and have been above 85 for at least the past two months. In this case I really think it was just this bird's genetics. 

 

I've also noticed that irrespective of when I've culled them, any of my birds with Bielefelder blood tend to be much fattier than my other breeds. I'm convinced that's part of the reason for their difficulty in the heat. 

Out of curiosity, where did you get your line of Bieles?  I know I tried to source as many of my Wyandottes from the deep South due to the heat and humididty, and I succeeded.  Some are from one county west (Luanne of Eight Acres), some from central Texas (Ideal Poultry), and the rest from Missouri (Cackle Hatchery) which can get some brutal summers some years ... usually when my family drove (with no AC) there to the family farm (with no AC) for a big outdoor cookout.  Oops, back on topic - I have not had any birds heat stroking or even distressing, and neither Wyandottes nor Silkies are known for being heat tolerant breeds.  My F1s are out hopping around today, completely unphased by the heat.  Then again, they are also sticking to the shady area.

Starting up a GLW project, hatching the F1 generation http://sandghomesteade.blogspot.com

Learning caponizing

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Starting up a GLW project, hatching the F1 generation http://sandghomesteade.blogspot.com

Learning caponizing

Reply
post #10119 of 11315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfr1973 View Post
 

Out of curiosity, where did you get your line of Bieles?  I know I tried to source as many of my Wyandottes from the deep South due to the heat and humididty, and I succeeded.  Some are from one county west (Luanne of Eight Acres), some from central Texas (Ideal Poultry), and the rest from Missouri (Cackle Hatchery) which can get some brutal summers some years ... usually when my family drove (with no AC) there to the family farm (with no AC) for a big outdoor cookout.  Oops, back on topic - I have not had any birds heat stroking or even distressing, and neither Wyandottes nor Silkies are known for being heat tolerant breeds.  My F1s are out hopping around today, completely unphased by the heat.  Then again, they are also sticking to the shady area.

 

I bought hatching eggs from two separate Bielefelder breeders, one located in Oklahoma and one located in another state I can't quite recall...Alabama, I think. 

 

Silkies aren't heat tolerant? I didn't know that. Ironically, my lone Buff Silkie has proven to be the one least fazed by our excessive heat. While the other birds lay around panting, she just happily goes about her day scratching around like she doesn't have a care in the world. She even comes to me to be picked up and snuggled despite it being over 100*F, LOL! Silly little chicken!

post #10120 of 11315

I know many here have been missing Hellbender and wondering about his well-being. His son, Jason, gave me permission to update everyone.

 

It is with a heart heavy with sadness that I report that after returning home to be with his family, Hellbender (Ron) was taken off his respirator and died in the early hours on Thursday, June 16th.  His family held a small, private Irish wake for him. My heart goes out to them and to all who loved him, and it is my greatest hope that their grief will soon abate enough for them to smile at their memories of him rather than weep.

 

I never had the honor of meeting Hellbender in person, but that has in no way lessened the tremendously positive impact he had on me. I miss my friend; I miss his delightfully warped sense of humor, his sagacious instruction, and his enormously kind heart. To this day I cannot comprehend why, of all the people he met here on the BYC, he chose to befriend me and share so much with me.  In spite of his numerous frustrations with electronic communication, he never hesitated to offer me guidance and encouragement as I strove to learn as much as possible as quickly as possible about poultry keeping, and he never hesitated to lend me his ear when I simply needed to vent some frustrations about life in general or receive some much-needed advice. He was a very generous man who shared with me his abundant love for his family, his concerns and perspectives on world events, and the wisdom of his years.

 

Yes, I miss my friend, as I’m sure so many others here do, but I am also tremendously grateful to him for all he gave me. I am grateful for the opportunity to have also met his son, Jason, and his daughter, Ariel, through him, and for meeting so many other extraordinary people here on the thread Hellbender created. It is a tribute to him that so many will continue to learn and grow because of environment he created here.

 

Thank you, Hellbender. You will be sorely missed. 

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