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post #12141 of 13165
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Originally Posted by 3riverschick View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fire Ant Farm View Post
 

Thanks for all the input. Well, looked at it this AM, a couple points are still this same color, but no progressing, swelling, darkening, whiteness, etc. Just looks... a bit blue/purple. Blade is red again. Wonder if it is frostbite or not - will have to monitor.

 

With regard to circulation troubles - I had also already wondered that (and will continue to wonder). He's the largest of the Marans boys I had, and I actually kept him because of his impressive size (originally wasn't planning to keep any boys). I have two cockerels with these enormous straight combs. Both occasionally have purpling in the blade. The other is a very healthy smallish cream legbar cock bird. So I also am wondering if this just sometimes happens with a boy who has such a profoundly ginormous comb...

 

- Ant Farm 

Hopefully it will heal as long as it doesn't turn black. When it turns black, the black part will fall off. It won't heal in my experience , if it is black. This is a good reason to make sure the breed one gets is proper for the climate. Yes,I know you are in Florida and this is unusual. Sincerely tho, I have never had a breed here in western PA which didn't get frostbitten at one time in the winter. I do think ventilation may had Add to something to do with it. But we get extremely cold Jan here.  So I am going with Chanteclers to avoid the frostbite. I am tired of fighting the elements and watching them ruin months of work raising young cockerels only to see the comb tips blacken. Personally, I think coops have a lot to do with it. Birds in Woods Open Air coops built to proper dimensions just don't have these cold weather problems.  Put a teaspoon of food grade glycerin in the water. It won't let the water freeze and gives the birds a hole to drink out of. Won't hurt the bird in case they should drink any.

 Best,

 Karen


Thanks! (I'm in Texas, actually - but the chickens came from a breeder in Florida :D). The confusion was that I would NOT expect frostbite here at all. Warm to hot, and not a lot of precipitation (though we do get storms, etc.), coop very well ventilated. (It's 63F right now, 10am.)

 

His comb got better quickly - it was only a little purple (and may not have even been frostbite). Meanwhile, I looked in their coop more carefully the next day and discovered that the waterer had leaked a lot and soaked a lot of of the bedding under the thin dry top layer, which may have explained the issue. (Waterer is outside now, and bedding stirred and dried out/replenished). Glad I caught it...

 

- Ant Farm 


Edited by Fire Ant Farm - 12/13/16 at 7:51am
post #12142 of 13165
Okay guys.... how long do your pullers squawk and squat before giving up an egg? We have a girl who is so boisterous she's practically screaming any time we're around. She'll even squat the moment I say "Bonnie" or "bonbon", her comb and waffles have doubled in the past few weeks, but still nothing. I'd say she's close to 20-21 weeks. (We got her at "an estimated 12 weeks old")

Sulmtalers (Wheaten & Silver Wheaten) - Naked Necks - Ayam Cemani -  Cream Legbars - Heritage Narragansett Turkeys 

 

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post #12143 of 13165
Quote:
Originally Posted by GabrielBane View Post

Okay guys.... how long do your pullers squawk and squat before giving up an egg? We have a girl who is so boisterous she's practically screaming any time we're around. She'll even squat the moment I say "Bonnie" or "bonbon", her comb and waffles have doubled in the past few weeks, but still nothing. I'd say she's close to 20-21 weeks. (We got her at "an estimated 12 weeks old")

 

There's no doubt she's close, but it's up to the individual bird to decide when she's ready. The best precursor I've found to telling me when a pullet will lay is a rooster. As soon as one of my roosters mounts a pullet I know I'll get an egg within 2 days, 3 at the most. Notice that I said "rooster" and not "cockerel". Those young boys are so hormonal and wound up that they're not as reliable, but a more seasoned rooster always seems to know.

post #12144 of 13165
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertChic View Post
 

 

There's no doubt she's close, but it's up to the individual bird to decide when she's ready. The best precursor I've found to telling me when a pullet will lay is a rooster. As soon as one of my roosters mounts a pullet I know I'll get an egg within 2 days, 3 at the most. Notice that I said "rooster" and not "cockerel". Those young boys are so hormonal and wound up that they're not as reliable, but a more seasoned rooster always seems to know.

I'll keep that noted! We only have teen-age boys, but I recently replaced my Ayam Cemani with SBH's (which I'm getting in the next few days EEE!), so after quarintine, Bonnie will have a new tall, dark and handsome boy to squawk at. 

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post #12145 of 13165
Hey, I have a question for all of you;

Has any one tried to breed for bantam meat birds? For those with smaller families or just prefer smaller in general. I have seen Sumlater (so miss spelled that) bantams in a book of mind but I am not sure if they actually are bred with meat like quality.
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post #12146 of 13165
Quote:
Originally Posted by miss heny View Post

Hey, I have a question for all of you;

Has any one tried to breed for bantam meat birds? For those with smaller families or just prefer smaller in general. I have seen Sumlater (so miss spelled that) bantams in a book of mind but I am not sure if they actually are bred with meat like quality.

 

Probably not what you are looking for as they are Silkies w dark skin, but there is this:  https://www.purelypoultry.com/silkie-broilers-p-1303.html

 

I don't really know anything about Silkies but it looks like you would butcher them young so they are pretty small, even if they aren't bantams.

post #12147 of 13165
lol.png plan on buying those to test them out for our local Asian market, curious though if people have worked on a regular meat type bird bantamish size.
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post #12148 of 13165
Quote:
Originally Posted by miss heny View Post

lol.png plan on buying those to test them out for our local Asian market, curious though if people have worked on a regular meat type bird bantamish size.

Yeah I was thinking about getting some simply for the novelty of it.... kinda interesting.

post #12149 of 13165
Quote:
Originally Posted by miss heny View Post

Hey, I have a question for all of you;

Has any one tried to breed for bantam meat birds? For those with smaller families or just prefer smaller in general. I have seen Sumlater (so miss spelled that) bantams in a book of mind but I am not sure if they actually are bred with meat like quality.

Your large meat birds can be taken earlier. I aim for game hen size. These are large fowl Dark Cornish crossed with a CX meat bird at about 5 weeks of age.

 


Edited by lpatelski - 12/13/16 at 4:03pm

4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 

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4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 

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post #12150 of 13165
Quote:
Originally Posted by miss heny View Post

lol.png plan on buying those to test them out for our local Asian market, curious though if people have worked on a regular meat type bird bantamish size.

All the Cornish Bantams are meat birds

4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 

NPIP Dark Cornish  

Ga Poultry Dealer

ZipChick ID $15.00...

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4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 

NPIP Dark Cornish  

Ga Poultry Dealer

ZipChick ID $15.00...

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