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Rooster w/ Hens: Advantages/Disadvantages?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Just confirmed that I have 1 rooster with my 8 hens.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of having a rooster?

Thanks,

post #2 of 9

A good rooster is great protection for the hens, even going so far as to put himself between any predator and the hens.  If they are free-ranging a good rooster will not only lead the hens to tasty tidbits to eat, he'll allow them to eat first and offer them bugs he's caught from his beak.  Then there's the whole fertilized egg thing, making it handy if you ever want to try your hand at incubating without having to buy fertilized eggs. 
Disadvantages include the fact that roosters develop spurs that can injure someone if he decides that person is a threat to his flock or if he just turns out mean.  The rooster may decide to challenge you for top spot in the pecking order.  Some people simply cannot handle the mating ritual that goes on between a hen and a roo.  It's not pretty and a hen can lose feathers over it or be injured. 
I will never be without at least one rooster.  My chickens free-range and I can't be out with them non-stop, but my roosters are and they do their part to keep my flock safe.

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

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If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your reply.

So, there's no problem/concerns eating fertilized eggs. Is it possible to tell a fertilized from a non-fertilized egg?

post #4 of 9

If you crack the egg you can tell a fertilized egg from a non fertilized one. There is a really good thread with pics if you do a search for  fertilized eggs. 

I have seven roos and so far they are all nice big_smile  I hope I can keep them all!  They are NOT homed together tho.

ETA: and not no prob with eating fertilized eggs...in fact they may even be healthier big_smile  I have read that in many places now.


Edited by Hangin Wit My Peeps - 9/8/08 at 6:33am

Have had chickens for a whole six years now!  This year decided to try out ducks too!  WOW messy they are, but totally worth it, their cuteness overpowers all the messes they can make :D  Check them out at:  autumnbreezechickens.blogspot.com

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Have had chickens for a whole six years now!  This year decided to try out ducks too!  WOW messy they are, but totally worth it, their cuteness overpowers all the messes they can make :D  Check them out at:  autumnbreezechickens.blogspot.com

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post #5 of 9

Here is the link: How to tell if an egg is fertilized

http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=16008

Have had chickens for a whole six years now!  This year decided to try out ducks too!  WOW messy they are, but totally worth it, their cuteness overpowers all the messes they can make :D  Check them out at:  autumnbreezechickens.blogspot.com

Reply

Have had chickens for a whole six years now!  This year decided to try out ducks too!  WOW messy they are, but totally worth it, their cuteness overpowers all the messes they can make :D  Check them out at:  autumnbreezechickens.blogspot.com

Reply
post #6 of 9

We have 5 roos with 100 hens. The roosters are great! We've never had any incidents with them, but they really do watch out for the hens, keep them somewhat gathered together outside and find the best treats for them.

On the other hand, they do seem to have nearly constant chicken s3x, so many of our hens have featherless backs...

post #7 of 9

I would suggest you read some of the treads on rooster behavior. I had a rooster and did not know how to become the "king" of the flock and when I did try it was too late. He got to the point that everytime I can anywhere near the hens he would attack me. We had to cull him. sad  I do plan on getting another one now that I have some knowldge.

Here is one great link.



http://shilala.homestead.com/roosters.html


Good luck!  big_smile

post #8 of 9

If you gather the eggs as soon as they are laid then you wont have any fertile eggs. Which is what Im doing, but to make sure I also candle them too.
I just simply hold the eggs up to a 100 watt light and wrap my fingers around the egg and then put the egg up to the light. Make sure that if you do this that you dont get to close to the light or youll burn your fingers. You could also buy a candling light but that costs money and I try to do things fairly cheap these days!

Have fun doin what you do! Gotta love that incredible edible egg!

"Rich" is what I ain't. "Poor" is a state of mind and "Hopefull" isn't the only thing Im full of!
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"Rich" is what I ain't. "Poor" is a state of mind and "Hopefull" isn't the only thing Im full of!
Reply
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sticks22 

If you gather the eggs as soon as they are laid then you wont have any fertile eggs.


Gathering eggs has nothing to do with fertility. The rooster mates with the hens and then the hen lays fertile eggs for about 2 weeks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sticks22 

I just simply hold the eggs up to a 100 watt light and wrap my fingers around the egg and then put the egg up to the light. Make sure that if you do this that you dont get to close to the light or youll burn your fingers. You could also buy a candling light but that costs money and I try to do things fairly cheap these days!


You can't candle an egg for fertility. You crack one open and if there's a bullseye, it's fertile; if there's a dot, it's not. You can't see this through an egg shell.

Lisa 
1 hubby, 2 kids (ok, 1 is 18 now, so not technically a kid), 3 dogs, 1 cat, 1 hamster, and a 10 beautiful RIRs!
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Lisa 
1 hubby, 2 kids (ok, 1 is 18 now, so not technically a kid), 3 dogs, 1 cat, 1 hamster, and a 10 beautiful RIRs!
Reply
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