BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › I have a question about Clostridium perfringens
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

I have a question about Clostridium perfringens - Page 6

post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nambroth View Post
 

 

 

The odor is also a bit different than 'normal'. Sweet, but not nice to smell. Unpleasant enough to be 'off' but not like the sharp offensive odor of a normal fresh chicken poo. It is almost like vegetables/fruit that have started going bad and fermenting. Very hard to describe.

 

 

 I must warn that in my experience and according to my vet, they don't always improve right away and may not seem to get better until the medication course is done or nearly done. Once she started improving, her droppings went back to normal, she ate well, and gained weight again.

 

Nambroth is right, the smell is so hard to describe.  It's by no means stomach churning - it almost sweet, but at the same time not quite pleasant enough that you would want to go back and smell it again!

 

I had a girl who suffered from it as well, and it was thanks to Nambroth's experience with Coho and the information she posted that I managed to treat it myself.  My local vet didn't have a clue about chickens (all he did was test her poo for worms even though it looked exactly like the photo in Nambroth's post!)  so I decided it was 'kill or cure' and I treated her myself with amoxycilin - the only antibiotic I had available.  It took a long time to see any changes, but I perserved through lack of any other ideas to try.  However, once she started to show signs of improvement her recovery was pretty rapid.

 

Started out with 3 birds. Currently at 13 pullets and 2 roos

- chicken maths is definitely getting the better of me!

 

Member of the Derperella Club - we're all just going round the rooster here.

 

RIP Blackie (the best hen ever), Rusty (too curious once too often) and Cinders (my grey girl)

 

 

Reply
 

Started out with 3 birds. Currently at 13 pullets and 2 roos

- chicken maths is definitely getting the better of me!

 

Member of the Derperella Club - we're all just going round the rooster here.

 

RIP Blackie (the best hen ever), Rusty (too curious once too often) and Cinders (my grey girl)

 

 

Reply
post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ten chicks View Post
 

Some interesting reading on Clostridium,extremely graphic. www.slideshare.net/doctortvrao/clostridium?next_slideshow=1

 

I know in humans they have treated some Colstridium infections with the feces of healthy donors(frozen poop pills)this same treatment has been done with birds,giving ill birds the feces to eat of healthy birds.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seminolewind View Post
 


Ew!  I can't even handle the thought of it!

 

Why do you suppose that human infants are born face down and head first if not to inoculate their digestive track with mommies' yummy probiotics?

 

No idea, I know they get some antibodies from the amniotic fluid and mom's blood supply, and they get vitamin k because their intestines don't have the flora to produce it.  I thought they were face down to expel the fluid in their lungs and not choke on it.

 

Yea Kathy I remember seeing my foal eating poop.  That one didn't get kissed on the lips, LOL

RUNS WITH CHICKENS               

 

            Marek's FAQ  Nambroth's really BIG one!

 

            How to send a bird for a necropsy    by Casportpony

         

                          

                    

        

                                            

Reply

RUNS WITH CHICKENS               

 

            Marek's FAQ  Nambroth's really BIG one!

 

            How to send a bird for a necropsy    by Casportpony

         

                          

                    

        

                                            

Reply
post #53 of 56

Hi,

 

My sick chicken went to the vet and they said she had Clostridium and gave me amoxicillan.  The chicken was having liquid poops and passing blood in stool.  My sis is a Nurse and is freaking out about this!...    We have our chicken under quarantine and handling with gloves and giving meds.  From the vet perspective, all i had to do was give this meds and teh meds for worms and she would be fine.  My sis is worried about the human cross over and our family picking this up and being in the hospital for more than two weeks on a high dosage of meds (worse case scenario).

 

Can poultry CP cross over in to humans?

 

Thanks!

 

JJ-

post #54 of 56

Clostridium perfringens is everywhere in the environment, human intestines, and soil, so I would not even worry about it. It is a common cause of food poisoning. Here are good articles to read:

http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/clostridium-perfingens.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clostridium_perfringens

post #55 of 56

Clostridium perfringens (necrotic enteritis) Host range Outbreaks of NE in poultry are typically sporadic,60,94,105,113 and the disease has been reported by poultry producers worldwide.23,39,67,99,132 Outbreaks are most common in broiler chickens 2–6 weeks of age,12,17,47,56,91 which is believed to be due to a window in the chick’s anti-clostridial immunity.85 This window develops when titers of maternal antibodies wane around 2 weeks of age and before the chick’s immune system reaches maturity at around 3–4 weeks of age.85,91 However, outbreaks also occur in broilers up to 11 weeks of age.64,87,101 The disease has also been reported in 3–6-month-old commercial layers50,110 and also in 12–16-week-old replacement pullets.24,50,51,101,110 An outbreak of NE in 9-month-old chickens was reported in India in 1974,83 but this is the only reported case of the disease in older birds. Necrotic enteritis has also been reported in a wide variety of avian species other than chickens, including turkeys,40–42,121 ostriches,84 quail,9 capercaillies,121,122 geese,134 bluebirds,18 lorikeets,98,104 and crows.8

 

http://vdi.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/03/28/1040638713483468.full

post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisanhunter View Post
 

Clostridium perfringens (necrotic enteritis) Host range Outbreaks of NE in poultry are typically sporadic,60,94,105,113 and the disease has been reported by poultry producers worldwide.23,39,67,99,132 Outbreaks are most common in broiler chickens 2–6 weeks of age,12,17,47,56,91 which is believed to be due to a window in the chick’s anti-clostridial immunity.85 This window develops when titers of maternal antibodies wane around 2 weeks of age and before the chick’s immune system reaches maturity at around 3–4 weeks of age.85,91 However, outbreaks also occur in broilers up to 11 weeks of age.64,87,101 The disease has also been reported in 3–6-month-old commercial layers50,110 and also in 12–16-week-old replacement pullets.24,50,51,101,110 An outbreak of NE in 9-month-old chickens was reported in India in 1974,83 but this is the only reported case of the disease in older birds. Necrotic enteritis has also been reported in a wide variety of avian species other than chickens, including turkeys,40–42,121 ostriches,84 quail,9 capercaillies,121,122 geese,134 bluebirds,18 lorikeets,98,104 and crows.8

 

http://vdi.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/03/28/1040638713483468.full

Welcome to BYC and thanks for the info!

 

-Kathy

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › I have a question about Clostridium perfringens