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Hens quit laying

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have three hens each are right at five months.  I got my first egg Tuesday after Labor Day.  I got an egg every day up until Tuesday last week.  I think only one of them is laying, not sure.  What could have caused them to stop laying?  I did get a soft shelled egg that I found inside the coop.  Any help and suggestions would be great.  Thank you in advance.

post #2 of 7
Soft shelled eggs are not totally uncommon but could indicate a calcium deficiency. Are you giving them oyster shell?

Too, my girls are starting to molt. Could it be the season for your girls?

What kind of birds? At what age should they molt?

Major change can stress them as predators can. Have you made any changes? New birds or something else? Ours quit laying for a few days until I ran off a raccoon. Shot over it because it was too close to our coops.

Good luck to ya!

5 Barred Plymouth Rock hens, 3 Barred Plymouth Rock roos, 6 Red Star hens, 4 Buff Orpington pullets, 1 Black Australorp pullet, 5 White Guinea keets, 4 Lavender Guinea keets, 1 Broken Rex, 2 (breeding pair) Red Heelers, 1 Golden Retriever, 1 Italian Greyhound, both hands full!!!

 


Our coops

 

Hunting chickens

 

Superman By Day, At Night He's Just Clark

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5 Barred Plymouth Rock hens, 3 Barred Plymouth Rock roos, 6 Red Star hens, 4 Buff Orpington pullets, 1 Black Australorp pullet, 5 White Guinea keets, 4 Lavender Guinea keets, 1 Broken Rex, 2 (breeding pair) Red Heelers, 1 Golden Retriever, 1 Italian Greyhound, both hands full!!!

 


Our coops

 

Hunting chickens

 

Superman By Day, At Night He's Just Clark

Reply
post #3 of 7

It's really hard to say off hand, could be numerous reasons....it can take up to a month or so for things to get 'regular' with new layers....and sometimes even older layers hit a dry spell. Stress is always a factor and stress can be caused by numerous things, some obvious to us and some obvious only to the chicken.

 

What are you feeding?

Do they free range?

Are these 3 your only chickens?

 

This might give you some clues too.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

It's really hard to say off hand, could be numerous reasons....it can take up to a month or so for things to get 'regular' with new layers....and sometimes even older layers hit a dry spell. Stress is always a factor and stress can be caused by numerous things, some obvious to us and some obvious only to the chicken.

What are you feeding?
Do they free range?
Are these 3 your only chickens?

This might give you some clues too.

Definitely check out that link. Really good!!

5 Barred Plymouth Rock hens, 3 Barred Plymouth Rock roos, 6 Red Star hens, 4 Buff Orpington pullets, 1 Black Australorp pullet, 5 White Guinea keets, 4 Lavender Guinea keets, 1 Broken Rex, 2 (breeding pair) Red Heelers, 1 Golden Retriever, 1 Italian Greyhound, both hands full!!!

 


Our coops

 

Hunting chickens

 

Superman By Day, At Night He's Just Clark

Reply

5 Barred Plymouth Rock hens, 3 Barred Plymouth Rock roos, 6 Red Star hens, 4 Buff Orpington pullets, 1 Black Australorp pullet, 5 White Guinea keets, 4 Lavender Guinea keets, 1 Broken Rex, 2 (breeding pair) Red Heelers, 1 Golden Retriever, 1 Italian Greyhound, both hands full!!!

 


Our coops

 

Hunting chickens

 

Superman By Day, At Night He's Just Clark

Reply
post #5 of 7

They are not going to lay every day.  They take days off, and when older, months off to molt.  Food, water, stress, molting, health, predators, etc can all affect laying.  But if it's just one day, she probably just took the day off.

Was breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders. Not anymore thanks to a bobcat.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!

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Was breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders. Not anymore thanks to a bobcat.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!

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post #6 of 7
Last spring my friend gave me 4 Turken peeps, so I built a pen for them next to my 4 laying hens 2 rir 2 white leghorns . A couple of weeks ago the Turken roo, started crowing and mating with the 3 Turkins hens , which soon after started laying eggs,. At about the same time my 2 rir stopped laying , the leghorns still are laying , I have noticed when the Turken roo crows the rir answer him. I don't know if these 2 rir are love sick or what. But they haven't laid an egg in a month?
post #7 of 7

I'm having the same issue with my Ameraucana.  She laid nearly every day for 2 months, then just quit about 2 weeks ago.  She's not molting and is acting healthy otherwise.  My other 3 girls (different breeds) are still laying so I'm thinking it's not a daylight issue (not to mention, I live in San Diego - it's not exactly grey and rainy out).  Is this just a normal break?  Is there anything I should be doing?

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