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How do you heat the laying boxes? - Page 10

post #91 of 99

I coiled the light rope so it laid flat. The whole coil fit in the bottom of the nest box. I put a paper bag over the top and then the nesting materials over that. 

 

But on a day like today....I guess I really didn't need it. It will give them a day or two to get used to it anyway and then WHAM, the cold weather returns. 

post #92 of 99

I am happy to report that the coiled rope light system seems to be working for keeping the eggs from freezing. Today, however will be the real test. I am unable to go and retrieve eggs until later this afternoon and the temps are not planning on going any higher than 2 degrees above zero. 

 

We will see how well this system works then. Yesterday one egg was alone in the box most of the day. It was cold, but the shell was not cracked. 

post #93 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTC Steve View Post
 

I am happy to report that the coiled rope light system seems to be working for keeping the eggs from freezing. Today, however will be the real test. I am unable to go and retrieve eggs until later this afternoon and the temps are not planning on going any higher than 2 degrees above zero. 

 

We will see how well this system works then. Yesterday one egg was alone in the box most of the day. It was cold, but the shell was not cracked. 

I would have cracked it for dinner.....just out of curiosity.

 

Best of Luck!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #94 of 99

Juggler, 

 

I just might do that to those laid today. Good idea. 

post #95 of 99
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTC Steve View Post
 

I am happy to report that the coiled rope light system seems to be working for keeping the eggs from freezing. Today, however will be the real test. I am unable to go and retrieve eggs until later this afternoon and the temps are not planning on going any higher than 2 degrees above zero. 

 

We will see how well this system works then. Yesterday one egg was alone in the box most of the day. It was cold, but the shell was not cracked. 

 

The design seems proven. The variables are still ambient temperature, supplied heat (watts), and durability.

 

17 watt heating pad seems sufficient for daytime temperatures in the low teens, which rarely occurs (no recollection ever of single digit daytime highs) in central New Jersey.

 

Would you know how many watts you are using for each box?

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #96 of 99

Not sure of the wattage, however I have been told that the constant temp on these rope lights only goes to 78 degrees (F). 

I will check on the wattage later today...if it is listed. 

post #97 of 99

Hello there, 

 

I was able to google the wattage on the rope light and it seems to be .8 watts per foot. I am estimating that I had about 10 feet of rope light...sooo...8 watts. A heating mat I just got for plants (cheap) is at 17 watts...I might switch this out even though the rope seems to be working all the same. The ladies seem to be fine...although production still remains at 1-2 for 4 hens. 

post #98 of 99
Thread Starter 

The 17 Watt mats are what I use in my boxes. Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing. 

 

I have extensive cold weather data indicating these should be good if daytime ambient temperatures reach the low teens, and the eggs are removed before the heat is turned off, or temps dip into the single digits.

 

Why did you decide to go with the mats if your rope lighting was working for you?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LTC Steve View Post
 

Hello there, 

 

I was able to google the wattage on the rope light and it seems to be .8 watts per foot. I am estimating that I had about 10 feet of rope light...sooo...8 watts. A heating mat I just got for plants (cheap) is at 17 watts...I might switch this out even though the rope seems to be working all the same. The ladies seem to be fine...although production still remains at 1-2 for 4 hens. 

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #99 of 99

Well, I said I would think about it. The rope light remains and low and behold when the temp went to the teens, I had three eggs from 4 hens and all intact. 

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