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Warning against using heat lamps in winter - Page 3

post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scan meter View Post

I have raised five chickens from hatchlings. Last night, our coop burned to the ground after the heat lamp sparked on a something. We lost all five chickens in the fire. I am heartbroken! Hopefully, our tragedy can warn others.

Temperatures had dropped to -20 windchill this week in our area. Our chicks did not actually need a heat lamp...I just felt bad for them and wanted to provide some warmth. They were doing just fine in their small coop without the lamp. Please please learn from me and choose another option. We are lucky our house didn't burn down too since the coop was right next to it.

Feeling horrible today!! I loved these chickens as much as any pet I have had! So sad ."

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by enola View Post

Original poster, can you please let everyone who reads this post know what state you live in? It will double warn everyone to think twice!!

 

So sorry for your loss. Thank you for your courage to share what happened. I concur with enola...please post what state you are in. If it's -20F with the windchill, you live some place fairly cold. Too many people will think, "But this won't happen to me...won't happen around here." But if you post your state, at least folks near you will read it and perhaps think twice.


Edited by pdirt - 1/11/15 at 3:44pm
post #22 of 30
Thread Starter 
Yes, I live in Iowa. My chickens were fine both in the extreme heat and cold this year. I was over thinking their needs. As the wild turkeys walked through my yard today, I realized how well birds survive climate changes. I feel really responsible for this fire and their deaths. Plus, we nearly caught our home on fire. No heat lamps or extension cords in your coop....EVER!
Edited by Scan meter - 1/11/15 at 4:49pm
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdirt View Post
 

 

If you can touch your bare fingers against that lightbulb, it must not be the typical 250W heat lamp, because it does look like one. Is it a heatlamp at all? And you'd be surprised what some folks consider as "common sense". I agree with others that your setup does not look safe in your original photo, but it must not be the common heat lamp if you can touch it like that.


Your right They are 75w Infared heat bulbs. And to the original poster I am also sorry you lost your chickens and coop. But to blame it on the heat lamp, You said a spark caused it, that wouldn't be the heat lamps fault but the cords fault. Should we all stop using cords because they sometimes cause fires. Im sorry but Just be safe when mounting your lamps and you will have no problems. No my chicken don't need the heat to survive But I won't tell you how to raise yours if you don't tell me how to raise mine.:)

post #24 of 30
Thread Starter 
It was from the bulb itself. Mine was a standard 250 watt heat lamp bulb sold at the agricultural store. I have never seen one that could be touched with bare hands after being turned on. The extension cord and the plug from the light are still intact as they were covered outside the coop. The lamp cord only has about 2 feet left as the rest burned off. The lamp itself melted or was destroyed. I didnt go inspect with the people who looked over the debis. The fire department said they believe a feather or debris ignited from the bulb. You are correct that we don't know exactly what started it, but it was not the cord. We were also told by the fire department that heat lamps are incredibly dangerous in a barn or coop of any kind. My coop was 6 feet tall by 12 feet long and the light was mounted at the ceiling.

I am not telling anyone how to raise their flock or anything else about having animals. I am passing along my story and information given to me by the fire department. Iowa is a huge agricultural state and the the fire department has warned us against this practice.

You do what's right for you and your farm. Maybe my loss will prevent someone else from the same situation happening. But I would say right back to you not say that this practice is ok. It may be safe the way you have it set up, but others may not have such large coops or use a 75 watt bulb.

All my farmer friends had told me over and over that chickens do not need supplemental heat. I believe that they were correct.
post #25 of 30
I just put out our heat lamp and after reading this I feel the need to take it down. I am so sorry for your losses I don't know what I would do if my chickens died in a fire!! I used the lamp from our brooder.
post #26 of 30

I'm so sorry for your loss!  Thank you for sharing this experience.  Hopefully it will prevent other fires.  

The joy of the Lord is my strength!
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The joy of the Lord is my strength!
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post #27 of 30
Your story rings true for quite a few people actually. Read Aoxa's story by looking up 'Les Farms The Barn of all Barns' here on byc. It does include pics of her barn ON FIRE and may just make you cry!
post #28 of 30
Thank you for sharing your story with us. Very sad that your chickens were lost in the fire. Any power sources near or around animals can be dangerous. my birds have endured many cold winters without a heat source and I'm a firm believer that providing a little extra insulation is always a safer option . There are some breeds that are more ' cold hardy ' , so if you have cold winters , it might pay to do your homework. smile.png
post #29 of 30

Scan meter I am so very sorry to read of your loss :( and also wanted to thank you for sharing;  hopefully your story may help others considering heating the coop. 

 

Cknldy thank you for the reference to Aoxa’s story also; so very sad :(

 

Luckily our climate is such that I do not need to consider heating the coop but if I did, I agree with Fancy that insulation sounds like a safer option.

 

I have, on a cold night [granted not as cold as some get] had cause to pick up or move one of the chickens snuggled on the roost and was quite surprised by how nice and warm she was.

Bambrook Bantams; Home to Cilla, Dusty, LuLu, Blondie and Crystal

 

'There is No snooze button on a chicken who wants breakfast'

 

'Until One Has Loved An Animal, Part Of Their Soul Remains Unawakened'

 

My Chicken Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bambrook-bantams

 

Teila's Tales from the Coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1109051/teilas-tales-from-the-coop

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Bambrook Bantams; Home to Cilla, Dusty, LuLu, Blondie and Crystal

 

'There is No snooze button on a chicken who wants breakfast'

 

'Until One Has Loved An Animal, Part Of Their Soul Remains Unawakened'

 

My Chicken Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bambrook-bantams

 

Teila's Tales from the Coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1109051/teilas-tales-from-the-coop

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post #30 of 30

Oh wow, that is terrible and I am so sorry to hear this happened to you!  I have been searching about information on heat lamps in the coop and their safety and this just convinced me to go unplug mine!  We have 6 chickens that are dear pets to us and it would be devastating to lose them in this way.  I am glad to hear that your house was not effected, but very sorry for your loss.  Thank you for sharing your story.

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