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Conventional non-GMO Whole Grain/Seed Recipe for Layers - Page 8

post #71 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by beginnergirl View Post

 

How do you calculate the protein content? Is it by weight?

 

 

 

A simple way to calculate protein is this.

Lets say your mixing a scratch grain and your using 40 pounds corn, 30 pounds wheat, 20 pounds oats and 10 pound Black Oil Sunflower Seed (BOSS).

All protein percentages are per 100 pounds of feedstuff. (Example corn is 8% protein per 100 pounds of weight) so you will have to divide the protein percentage 100 pounds to get the protein percentage per pound. 

 

Corns is 8% protein, wheat is 14% protein, oats is 13% protein and BOSS is 16% protein.

 

Corn --

8% protein ÷ 100 pounds = 0.08% protein

0.08% protein x 40 pounds (the amount being used in mix) = 3.2% total protein

 

Wheat --

14% protein ÷ 100 pounds = .14% protein

.14% protein x 30 pounds = 4.2% total protein

 

Oats --

13% protein ÷ 100 pounds = .13% protein

.13% protein x 20 pounds = 2.6% total protein

 

BOSS --

16% protein ÷ 100 pounds = .16% protein

.16% protein x 10 pounds = 1.6 total protein

 

Now add all the total proteins together.

3.2 + 4.2 + 2.6 + 1.6 = 11.6

 

So this scratch grain mix would be 11.6% protein

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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post #72 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris09 View Post


A simple way to calculate protein is this.
Lets say your mixing a scratch grain and your using 40 pounds corn, 30 pounds wheat, 20 pounds oats and 10 pound Black Oil Sunflower Seed (BOSS).
All protein percentages are per 100 pounds of feedstuff. (Example corn is 8% protein per 100 pounds of weight) so you will have to divide the protein percentage 100 pounds to get the protein percentage per pound. 

Corns is 8% protein, wheat is 14% protein, oats is 13% protein and BOSS is 16% protein.

Corn --
8% protein ÷ 100 pounds = 0.08% protein
0.08% protein x 40 pounds (the amount being used in mix) = 3.2% total protein

Wheat --
14% protein ÷ 100 pounds = .14% protein
.14% protein x 30 pounds = 4.2% total protein

Oats --
13% protein ÷ 100 pounds = .13% protein
.13% protein x 20 pounds = 2.6% total protein

BOSS --
16% protein ÷ 100 pounds = .16% protein
.16% protein x 10 pounds = 1.6 total protein

Now add all the total proteins together.
3.2 + 4.2 + 2.6 + 1.6 = 11.6

So this scratch grain mix would be 11.6% protein

Thanks. What do you use to increase protein content for feed
post #73 of 76

I still use fish meal to increase the protein but I decided not to keep putting it in the feed mix.  It was originally part of the feed, but now I put it in a separate container and let them take it "free-choice".

 

I also offer a high quality brewers yeast free choice in a separate container. 

 

They choose the BY over the fish meal if they have a choice.

 

 

However, I occasionally give the flock some high-quality (usually grass-fed ground) raw meat from time to time especially in winter.  Also the occasional raw-milk kefir or yogurt (made here at home).   In the summer they can get more "animal protein" (worms, bugs, etc.) on their own.

 

 

 

Edited to add a word I left out :)


Edited by Leahs Mom - 2/10/16 at 8:38am

Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

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Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

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post #74 of 76

Leahs Mom 

where do you get the grass fed raw beef?   Only place I know is Krogers $7.99 a pound.... you must have cows or access to such. where the fish meal?  where the high quality Brewers yeast?   

  cant have raw milk here in this Nanny state......

hopefully hemp one day. Lordy it will prob be pricey. You know it has to be taxed and regulated prob because its so good.. and we Know who controls this country. Yes big corporations......

i have asked around for over 3 yrs here..... even people with cattle here ...I have talked to . They just sell and not process any of their own...

  they say its cheaper.. duh...  just met a sweet lady last week that told me that...too..

  I even asked the "Cattlemens Association" if the burgers they were serving was grass fed.>>> Duh what a joke.

It all about the money not our health or the animals health...

thanks all


Edited by ladyearth - 2/10/16 at 2:28pm
post #75 of 76

I feel your frustration!!!!

 

I found a small farm in my area (by word of mouth)  that sells the grass fed.  They have low line cattle so if you purchase a side or quarter it doesn't break the bank.  I know the farm personally so I know how they are raised.  If I purchase ground only, they sell by the lb. when they do a butchering for ground-only.  It started out at $3/lb. a couple years ago and has now risen to $4/lb.  But, as you know, even $4/lb. is great.  I also have a friend that has gotten us a deer every year for the last several years.  We save the venison for ourselves, but our birdies get some of the beef on occasion.

 

If my only source for meat was grocery/conventional, I likely wouldn't feed raw...and maybe not at all.

 

 

Fish meal I get from a semi-local, old fashioned feed mill.  It is usable for organic.  I purchase that by the lb. and they allow me to purchase as much or as little as I want.  Of course, if I purchase the whole bag it is less per lb.  I also purchase my grains by the 50 lb. bag and then I only mix enough feed to last for a week or 2 at a time.  That way I don't have any grains that are ground sitting around getting rancid.

 

The raw milk is illegal in our state too.  You can often find someone that will sell to you if you ask around.  We are currently part of a cow share, but I do have other sources that are good as well.  Sometimes you can find someone that labels for pet consumption only which is legal...the farm has no liability for what you might do with it after you have it in your possession.  So, there are lots of ways to connect with milk if you have the will and determination.  Of course, not all milk is created equal so you have to do a bit of homework.  The reason we joined the milk share, as opposed to my normal source, is that all their cattle are Jersey, A2/A2 genetics, and grass fed.  My normal place has a mix of cattle breeds and genetics.

Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

Reply

Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

Reply
post #76 of 76

i thought Indiana raw milk was legal.. hum

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