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Mama Heating Pad in the Brooder (Picture Heavy) - UPDATE - Page 797

post #7961 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

-pad must be able have any 'auto-off' function disabled, might also need to be manually turned on and reset after power outage restoration.

-chicks must be able to touch backs to heat(adjustable legs are the answer for me).

 

Thanks,  aart, I didn't know about those two points. I know I would have been nervous about the babies burning themselves and I probably would have made it so they couldn't quite touch it. I might also have to find a solution (or get my bf to make something) that will make the blanket switch to batteries in case of an outage. I know how the local utility prioritizes restoring people and it doesn't start with the people who live out in the boonies!

 

Also if ever there is an outage, will the babies be alright for a few hours, if no one is home to turn it back on?

post #7962 of 9670
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 

 

Thanks,  aart, I didn't know about those two points. I know I would have been nervous about the babies burning themselves and I probably would have made it so they couldn't quite touch it. I might also have to find a solution (or get my bf to make something) that will make the blanket switch to batteries in case of an outage. I know how the local utility prioritizes restoring people and it doesn't start with the people who live out in the boonies!

 

Also if ever there is an outage, will the babies be alright for a few hours, if no one is home to turn it back on?

Nothing to worry about....well, they're chicks so there's always SOMETHING to worry about, but for the most part it's a pretty worry-free way to raise chicks.

 

  I raise my chicks outdoors almost from day one....if I have shipped chicks I keep them in for a day or so to make sure they are eating, drinking, know where the heat is, and to keep an eye out for shipping stress.  Incubator chicks are outside the day after they hatched when I know they are doing well.  

 

I had a power outage here.  One April night Ken and I went to bed, the winds were howling and snow was blowing sideways.  I had week old chicks outside under Mama Heating Pad.  The power must have gone out shortly after we went to bed at 11.  He woke up to the sound of the power coming back on at 4 am.  He threw off the covers yelling "the chicks!"  We bundled up and went out there, and I fully expected to find my little ones frozen stiff.  Nope.  Their straw cave combined with their own body heat maintained enough warmth to sustain them during the entire outage.  The cave wasn't "warm" in the sense that we think of needing to have with chicks, but they were just fine.  In fact, they were much more upset with us shining a flashlight into their cave and pulling them out to do a head count than they were not having power for so long!  So we turned the pad back on and reset the "Stay On" feature and went back to bed.  The next morning (or later that morning!) when I went out they were running around all over the place.  As far as they were concerned nothing had even happened!  You have to remember that it was in the teens that night, winds were at 60 mph, it was snowing like crazy, and they were outside in their wire brooder in the run, not in the coop!

 

One of our members, @henless uses a heating pad that not only turns itself back on in the event of an outage, it even remembers the last setting!  Several other members have opted for this pad based on her recommendation. This is the link to that pad:

http://www.sunbeam.com/pain-relief/heating-pads/sunbeam-heating-pad-with-ultraheat-technology-blue/000771-810-000.html#sz=12&start=18

 

As for getting trapped, I've never had it happen but a few people have so the modifications made for that eventuality are pretty simple. If you have the "cave" open at the back as well as the front chicks that get shoved to the back can still get out when the ones in front don't want to get out of the way.  The risk of them being trapped between the wires and the pad are eliminated by putting the pad on the inside of the frame. @Beekissed uses this setup and she's one of first to use MHP - I kinda sorta got the idea from her.  I have also switched over to this configuration.  The link to the page where it's discussed, along with some of @Beekissed's concise and clear photos, is here on this page:

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/956958/mama-heating-pad-in-the-brooder-picture-heavy-update/450

 

No fires reported, no sparks, my chicks have never bothered the cord but I imagine if you are worried about it you could slip the cord into a small cut section of garden hose or conduit where it is actually within their reach.  One thing I do recommend is to use electrical tape on your connections, where the cord plugs into the pad and then if you are using a extension cord (heavy duty outdoor rated cord!!) to keep moisture out, but that's not just with MHP, that's just common sense anytime you are using something electrical outdoors. 

 

You do know that photos of your chicks are your Broody Brigade membership dues, right?  So as soon as those little stinkers get here and get settled, get out that camera!  :D 


Edited by Blooie - 12/16/16 at 7:06am
post #7963 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blooie View Post
 

You do know that photos of your chicks are your Broody Brigade membership dues, right?  So as soon as those little stinkers get here and get settled, get out that camera!  :D

Will do! The chicks are most likely a year or two down the road, my BF and I are looking to get a house this spring and we'll go from there, I just want to be a Responsible Chicken Step-Mama TM by doing all the research I can first, so as to do the best I can! I know I'll make rookie mistakes and I might lose a few, but that doesn't mean I can't eliminate the most basic ones!

 

I've already decided that I'll go with Mama Heat Pad and that I can set them outside earlier rather than later (that's one of the small hurdles I have with my BF, I know he doesn't want them in the house longer than they have to be) and if I can put them outside at 3~4 weeks instead of 2~3 months, I'll have one more argument under my sleeve! 

I know some people put them out right away, but I plan on enjoying the cute and fuzzy stage while I can :jumpy:P. I know i'll be super hovering with my first batch, so it'll be easier when they are in the house!

 

I'm also looking for reputable Canadian breeders for the breeds I want and spending my days watching Youtube for learning how to get my chickens to feed naturally, to reduce cost/improve health/ increase mental stimulation.

post #7964 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 

Will do! The chicks are most likely a year or two down the road, my BF and I are looking to get a house this spring and we'll go from there, I just want to be a Responsible Chicken Step-Mama TM by doing all the research I can first, so as to do the best I can! I know I'll make rookie mistakes and I might lose a few, but that doesn't mean I can't eliminate the most basic ones!

 

I've already decided that I'll go with Mama Heat Pad and that I can set them outside earlier rather than later (that's one of the small hurdles I have with my BF, I know he doesn't want them in the house longer than they have to be) and if I can put them outside at 3~4 weeks instead of 2~3 months, I'll have one more argument under my sleeve! 

I know some people put them out right away, but I plan on enjoying the cute and fuzzy stage while I can :jumpy:P. I know i'll be super hovering with my first batch, so it'll be easier when they are in the house!

 

I'm also looking for reputable Canadian breeders for the breeds I want and spending my days watching Youtube for learning how to get my chickens to feed naturally, to reduce cost/improve health/ increase mental stimulation.

Keep in mind, most breeders only offer straight run chicks, so you'll need a plan for any that turn out to be male.

post #7965 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

Keep in mind, most breeders only offer straight run chicks, so you'll need a plan for any that turn out to be male.

I do! I might keep one roo, maybe, but next on my list is to find someone who can butcher the chickens for me, or find out where I can rent the equipment, preferably the former, since it'll be cheaper. I'm planning on probably culling some of the hens to, that why I'm getting dual purpose breeds anyways. Keep the best and/or my favourites, the rest will keep in the freezer. 

 

Thank you for the concern, though :hugs

post #7966 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

Keep in mind, most breeders only offer straight run chicks, so you'll need a plan for any that turn out to be male.

I do! I might keep one roo, maybe, but next on my list is to find someone who can butcher the chickens for me, or find out where I can rent the equipment, preferably the former, since it'll be cheaper. I'm planning on probably culling some of the hens to, that why I'm getting dual purpose breeds anyways. Keep the best and/or my favourites, the rest will keep in the freezer. 

 

 

Equipment doesn't cost much if you pluck by hand, totally do-able for just taking care a some extra cockerels.

Not sure if this breeder is near you but....http://lesfarms.weebly.com/

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7967 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Equipment doesn't cost much if you pluck by hand, totally do-able for just taking care a some extra cockerels.

Not sure if this breeder is near you but....http://lesfarms.weebly.com/

:woot That's actually within driving distance of where I live, certainly closer than driving to Halifax. They don't have the breeds I would like, but might be easier to just buy a few chicks locally and then see how I deal with those!

 

Thank you!

post #7968 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Equipment doesn't cost much if you pluck by hand, totally do-able for just taking care a some extra cockerels.

Not sure if this breeder is near you but....http://lesfarms.weebly.com/

:woot That's actually within driving distance of where I live, certainly closer than driving to Halifax. They don't have the breeds I would like, but might be easier to just buy a few chicks locally and then see how I deal with those!

 

Thank you!

They may be able to refer a breeder of another breed nearby.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7969 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 

Will do! The chicks are most likely a year or two down the road, my BF and I are looking to get a house this spring and we'll go from there, I just want to be a Responsible Chicken Step-Mama TM by doing all the research I can first, so as to do the best I can! I know I'll make rookie mistakes and I might lose a few, but that doesn't mean I can't eliminate the most basic ones!

 

I've already decided that I'll go with Mama Heat Pad and that I can set them outside earlier rather than later (that's one of the small hurdles I have with my BF, I know he doesn't want them in the house longer than they have to be) and if I can put them outside at 3~4 weeks instead of 2~3 months, I'll have one more argument under my sleeve! 

I know some people put them out right away, but I plan on enjoying the cute and fuzzy stage while I can :jumpy:P. I know i'll be super hovering with my first batch, so it'll be easier when they are in the house!

 

I'm also looking for reputable Canadian breeders for the breeds I want and spending my days watching Youtube for learning how to get my chickens to feed naturally, to reduce cost/improve health/ increase mental stimulation.

 

You can get around that with careful planning. Don't start building the coop until after the chicks arrive. Tell him coops are fast and easy to build and chicks grow VERY slowly  :lau 

 

Of course he might be your EX BF when he finds out coops take MUCH longer to build that you think they will and chicks grow MUCH faster than you think they will. A 2 week old chick can fly up to a 2' high surface. At 4 weeks, the chicks I got in June 2015 and were raised by one of the 2012 girls decided it was time to sleep on the 4' high roosts with the older girls. There is a 2' high roost that the girls use (most of the time) to stage their launch to the 4' high roost. But any of them can hit the 4' roost directly if they choose to make the effort.

 

BTW, most any chick raised by most any method is ready to go out in the elements by 4 weeks. There is no reason to keep them in the house 2-3 months any more than they need constant high ambient temperatures in their first weeks. Once they are fully feathered they can deal with outside temps as long as there isn't a draft blowing over them. That is true of adult birds as well.

 

What breeds are you planning to get?

2 each: Black Australorp, Salmon Faverolles, 1 each Ancona, Easter Egger. From Ideal Poultry, hatched June 12, 2012


2 JGs (non standard BAs??), 2 White Rocks, 2 EEs. From Meyer, hatched June 8, 2015



Bruce

Reply

2 each: Black Australorp, Salmon Faverolles, 1 each Ancona, Easter Egger. From Ideal Poultry, hatched June 12, 2012


2 JGs (non standard BAs??), 2 White Rocks, 2 EEs. From Meyer, hatched June 8, 2015



Bruce

Reply
post #7970 of 9670
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceha2000 View Post
 

 

You can get around that with careful planning. Don't start building the coop until after the chicks arrive. Tell him coops are fast and easy to build and chicks grow VERY slowly  :lau 

 

Of course he might be your EX BF when he finds out coops take MUCH longer to build that you think they will and chicks grow MUCH faster than you think they will. A 2 week old chick can fly up to a 2' high surface. At 4 weeks, the chicks I got in June 2015 and were raised by one of the 2012 girls decided it was time to sleep on the 4' high roosts with the older girls. There is a 2' high roost that the girls use (most of the time) to stage their launch to the 4' high roost. But any of them can hit the 4' roost directly if they choose to make the effort.

 

BTW, most any chick raised by most any method is ready to go out in the elements by 4 weeks. There is no reason to keep them in the house 2-3 months any more than they need constant high ambient temperatures in their first weeks. Once they are fully feathered they can deal with outside temps as long as there isn't a draft blowing over them. That is true of adult birds as well.

 

What breeds are you planning to get?

Well, we shall see for the coop, I might just get a simple one to start with, as I plan on having my horse at home to, so I was going to use one stall (or two;)) for the chickens.

 

I'd prefer to get it set up before the chickens arrive anyways, since most of the places I'll be ordering from there is a minimum amount of chicks. I'll try yo get a few other people in the area to order with me, but I know from previous attempts at that, that it usually falls through, so I have to be prepared to house the minimum, at least until I can cull some.

 

As for the breeds, mostly Buff Orpintongs with a few silver-laced Wyandottes are the breeds I really want and I've been debating on getting one or two of a few other breeds for the heck, like the Dorking or Salmon Faverolles or whatever else the breeder has that looks interesting and is cold tolerant (and I mean cold, it fell to -25c or -13f without the wind), so no naked necks for me!

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