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Mama Heating Pad in the Brooder (Picture Heavy) - UPDATE - Page 798

post #7971 of 9669

Get as many different breeds as you can. You may be surprised by what you like and don't like. 

post #7972 of 9669
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceha2000 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 

Will do! The chicks are most likely a year or two down the road, my BF and I are looking to get a house this spring and we'll go from there, I just want to be a Responsible Chicken Step-Mama TM by doing all the research I can first, so as to do the best I can! I know I'll make rookie mistakes and I might lose a few, but that doesn't mean I can't eliminate the most basic ones!

 

I've already decided that I'll go with Mama Heat Pad and that I can set them outside earlier rather than later (that's one of the small hurdles I have with my BF, I know he doesn't want them in the house longer than they have to be) and if I can put them outside at 3~4 weeks instead of 2~3 months, I'll have one more argument under my sleeve! 

I know some people put them out right away, but I plan on enjoying the cute and fuzzy stage while I can :jumpy:P. I know i'll be super hovering with my first batch, so it'll be easier when they are in the house!

 

I'm also looking for reputable Canadian breeders for the breeds I want and spending my days watching Youtube for learning how to get my chickens to feed naturally, to reduce cost/improve health/ increase mental stimulation.

 

 

 

BTW, most any chick raised by most any method is ready to go out in the elements by 4 weeks. There is no reason to keep them in the house 2-3 months any more than they need constant high ambient temperatures in their first weeks. Once they are fully feathered they can deal with outside temps as long as there isn't a draft blowing over them. That is true of adult birds as well.

 

What breeds are you planning to get?

 

The thing is to get your chicks in the spring so that temps aren't dire mid-winter, giving them 3 seasons to grow before the next winter. Most people with MHP put their chicks out very early-- mine went into a brooder pen located within my adult chickens' coop at 3 days old, long enough for me to ensure they were all healthy, no pasty butt, and eating and drinking. I incubated them from eggs, so they also hatched here, and one of the young hens (all have been laying some time now from a spring hatch) likes to be picked up and cuddled sometimes, my first chicken ever to do that.  

 

Anyway point being, most people advocate putting them in the brooder in outdoor coop, with MHP, at just a few days old, not 2-3 weeks.  Ours were fully integrated in the flock by 4 weeks, really by 3 weeks.  Amazing difference from the usual method of keeping them isolated until large enough to stand up to the adults.  A beautiful method.

 

best wishes,

--V

post #7973 of 9669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victoria-nola View Post
 

 

The thing is to get your chicks in the spring so that temps aren't dire mid-winter, giving them 3 seasons to grow before the next winter. Most people with MHP put their chicks out very early-- mine went into a brooder pen located within my adult chickens' coop at 3 days old, long enough for me to ensure they were all healthy, no pasty butt, and eating and drinking. I incubated them from eggs, so they also hatched here, and one of the young hens (all have been laying some time now from a spring hatch) likes to be picked up and cuddled sometimes, my first chicken ever to do that.  

 

Anyway point being, most people advocate putting them in the brooder in outdoor coop, with MHP, at just a few days old, not 2-3 weeks.  Ours were fully integrated in the flock by 4 weeks, really by 3 weeks.  Amazing difference from the usual method of keeping them isolated until large enough to stand up to the adults.  A beautiful method.

 

best wishes,

--V

Ditto Dat^^^

 

My hatched chicks were out in the coop partition at one week old(April 4th) with MHP, mingling with flock via escape doors at 4 weeks, and 'fully' integrated with partition wall gone at 6 weeks.


Edited by aart - 12/16/16 at 6:03pm

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7974 of 9669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceha2000 View Post
 

 

You can get around that with careful planning. Don't start building the coop until after the chicks arrive. Tell him coops are fast and easy to build and chicks grow VERY slowly  :lau 

 

Of course he might be your EX BF when he finds out coops take MUCH longer to build that you think they will and chicks grow MUCH faster than you think they will. A 2 week old chick can fly up to a 2' high surface. At 4 weeks, the chicks I got in June 2015 and were raised by one of the 2012 girls decided it was time to sleep on the 4' high roosts with the older girls. There is a 2' high roost that the girls use (most of the time) to stage their launch to the 4' high roost. But any of them can hit the 4' roost directly if they choose to make the effort.

 

BTW, most any chick raised by most any method is ready to go out in the elements by 4 weeks. There is no reason to keep them in the house 2-3 months any more than they need constant high ambient temperatures in their first weeks. Once they are fully feathered they can deal with outside temps as long as there isn't a draft blowing over them. That is true of adult birds as well.

 

What breeds are you planning to get?

Well, we shall see for the coop, I might just get a simple one to start with, as I plan on having my horse at home to, so I was going to use one stall (or two;)) for the chickens.

 

I'd prefer to get it set up before the chickens arrive anyways, since most of the places I'll be ordering from there is a minimum amount of chicks. I'll try yo get a few other people in the area to order with me, but I know from previous attempts at that, that it usually falls through, so I have to be prepared to house the minimum, at least until I can cull some.

 

As for the breeds, mostly Buff Orpintongs with a few silver-laced Wyandottes are the breeds I really want and I've been debating on getting one or two of a few other breeds for the heck, like the Dorking or Salmon Faverolles or whatever else the breeder has that looks interesting and is cold tolerant (and I mean cold, it fell to -25c or -13f without the wind), so no naked necks for me!

 

Just be careful what you buy if you don't build the first coop yourself. The vast majority of pre-made coops you see are WAY too small for the number of birds they claim. And they are often made with inferior materials to keep them cheap. You can build a bigger and better one for less money.

 

My coop is a converted horse stall. Works really well since it is reasonably large and inside another building by default so the "elements" don't reach it directly. Plus, for those that don't want to look out their windows at a "basic, boring" coop, having a stall in the barn is perfect. People don't generally expect anything fancy inside the barn. Cover the upper open parts of the stall with 1/2" hardware cloth and voila, a coop is born. 

2 each: Black Australorp, Salmon Faverolles, 1 each Ancona, Easter Egger. From Ideal Poultry, hatched June 12, 2012


2 JGs (non standard BAs??), 2 White Rocks, 2 EEs. From Meyer, hatched June 8, 2015



Bruce

Reply

2 each: Black Australorp, Salmon Faverolles, 1 each Ancona, Easter Egger. From Ideal Poultry, hatched June 12, 2012


2 JGs (non standard BAs??), 2 White Rocks, 2 EEs. From Meyer, hatched June 8, 2015



Bruce

Reply
post #7975 of 9669

I don't currently have any chickens, so I don't need to worry about integration at this point and right now I can't find the kind of coop that I want. Right now the the BF and I (mostly I) are looking at getting a shed or another building, like an old RV no one wants that's been gutted and converting it into a coop, or building the coop ourselves. 

 

But again, it depends where we buy our house. If we end up in a forever home, I might just build something that's good for a year or two while we build the barn, or if its in a space where we might only be staying for a few years and then moving, I'd build something a little stronger.

 

As for when to let them out, I'd also only want to let them outside once they are to big to pass through whatever fencing I have. Planning on electric, but can't guarantee right now, it'll depend on whats available.

 

As I said, right now I'm just looking to learn as much as I can before I make the commitment 

 

Thank you all, though :hugs 

post #7976 of 9669

Both sheds and old RVs have been done here on BYC. 

2 each: Black Australorp, Salmon Faverolles, 1 each Ancona, Easter Egger. From Ideal Poultry, hatched June 12, 2012


2 JGs (non standard BAs??), 2 White Rocks, 2 EEs. From Meyer, hatched June 8, 2015



Bruce

Reply

2 each: Black Australorp, Salmon Faverolles, 1 each Ancona, Easter Egger. From Ideal Poultry, hatched June 12, 2012


2 JGs (non standard BAs??), 2 White Rocks, 2 EEs. From Meyer, hatched June 8, 2015



Bruce

Reply
post #7977 of 9669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 

I don't currently have any chickens, so I don't need to worry about integration at this point and right now I can't find the kind of coop that I want. Right now the the BF and I (mostly I) are looking at getting a shed or another building, like an old RV no one wants that's been gutted and converting it into a coop, or building the coop ourselves. 

 

But again, it depends where we buy our house. If we end up in a forever home, I might just build something that's good for a year or two while we build the barn, or if its in a space where we might only be staying for a few years and then moving, I'd build something a little stronger.

 

As for when to let them out, I'd also only want to let them outside once they are to big to pass through whatever fencing I have. Planning on electric, but can't guarantee right now, it'll depend on whats available.

 

As I said, right now I'm just looking to learn as much as I can before I make the commitment 

 

Thank you all, though 

It's good you're doing lots of research way ahead of time.......it will make things easier in the long run, fewer surprises and re-do's.

A shed is a great idea as it can be used for other things if you eventually build a bigger better coop...gutted RV/camper could be good to as it's 'portable'.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7978 of 9669
Quote:
 
Originally Posted by Thiriel View Post
 

I don't currently have any chickens, so I don't need to worry about integration at this point and right now I can't find the kind of coop that I want. Right now the the BF and I (mostly I) are looking at getting a shed or another building, like an old RV no one wants that's been gutted and converting it into a coop, or building the coop ourselves. 

 

But again, it depends where we buy our house. If we end up in a forever home, I might just build something that's good for a year or two while we build the barn, or if its in a space where we might only be staying for a few years and then moving, I'd build something a little stronger.

 

As for when to let them out, I'd also only want to let them outside once they are to big to pass through whatever fencing I have. Planning on electric, but can't guarantee right now, it'll depend on whats available.

 

As I said, right now I'm just looking to learn as much as I can before I make the commitment 

 

Thank you all, though 

 

 

 

 

Just want to clear up one thing.  I was NOT talking about releasing them outdoors with no controls.  I was talking about having a brooder-sized enclosure for them, within their coop, with 1/2 hardware cloth or other secure enclosure that the chicks can't get out of, and where they are protected from drafts and have their MHP.  You'll see if you read more into the concepts here, MHP is most commonly used with the method of early placement outdoors where the chicks have a more natural relationship with outdoor temperatures and their eventual outdoor (meaning, their coop) home.  

 

best wishes,

--Victoria

post #7979 of 9669
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

It's good you're doing lots of research way ahead of time.......it will make things easier in the long run, fewer surprises and re-do's.

A shed is a great idea as it can be used for other things if you eventually build a bigger better coop...gutted RV/camper could be good to as it's 'portable'.


I LOVE that gutted RV/camper idea!

Dawn

 

If your goals do not frighten you… they are not big enough!


http://blueridgebuild.blogspot.com Documenting our home building project..
Reply

Dawn

 

If your goals do not frighten you… they are not big enough!


http://blueridgebuild.blogspot.com Documenting our home building project..
Reply
post #7980 of 9669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victoria-nola View Post
 
<Snip!>
Anyway point being, most people advocate putting them in the brooder in outdoor coop, with MHP, at just a few days old, not 2-3 weeks.  Ours were fully integrated in the flock by 4 weeks, really by 3 weeks.  Amazing difference from the usual method of keeping them isolated until large enough to stand up to the adults.  A beautiful method.

 

best wishes,

--V

The way I integrated my August batch with the older birds may also be doable in your case. As mentioned before, introduce them as soon as they can take the outdoor temps, but keep them physically separated from the older birds. I used a large dog cage (cover the top so they don't get pooped on). Once the coop was finished I had to lock all the birds into the coop while I built the run, and that is when I integrated them; All the older birds and the August batch went in together, no cages.

 

They were all so interested in checking out their new home they were too busy to notice the new birds were freely roaming among them and they all got along great. Nor have there been any squabbles since.


Edited by FlyWheel - 12/18/16 at 7:32am

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

Reply

D.gif  ~ ACORN ACRES in South Cackalacky jumpy.gif

 

Seven Easter Eggers, a Black Australorp, 1 Cuckoo Marans, An old Production Red,

and some really prolific oak trees!

Reply
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