New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Rooster Decrowing - Page 2

post #11 of 17

Per other people who've had this done (and the most knowledgeable vet in my area who does the surgery), it is KEY to keep them quiet and calm for several weeks, otherwise they are prone to healing in exactly the way you don't want them to and reclaiming their ability to crow, sometimes getting back up to 60% of their former volume (whereas a properly healed up roo will sound like he's coughing when he crows).

-Isobel

Author, Mastiff owner, lover of expensive cheese.

BBS English Orpington herder.

Reply

-Isobel

Author, Mastiff owner, lover of expensive cheese.

BBS English Orpington herder.

Reply
post #12 of 17
Just wondering how your boys are getting along?
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Sustained. I meant to update a while ago. Both are still alive, fine and doing well. The young guy had a much harder time and slower recovery. They both went through a phase of "laryngitis" where they seemed to lose their speaking voices. I felt extremely guilty and upset about this, but eventually, both are "talking" again. Big Daddy has a normal speaking voice and Sonny Boy still kind of whispers.

Both of them have gone back to doing some version of a crow. Thankfully, it doesn't sound like Cock-a-doodle doo! Nor is it ear or wall piercing as before. It sounds like what the cockerels first crowing attempts sound like; sort of missing the last flourish. Loud seagull? Male pigeon in heat? Angry squirrel? Whatever. They're still with their families, and Big Daddy is still giving Sonny a nice chase first thing every morning.
post #14 of 17
I'm glad it all ended well for them ☺️
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'm glad to have the rooster alarm system back up and running!

To those who think roosters are just good for meat or fighting, I just want to sing in praise of them.

All the roosters I have ever known to make it to that point have been good parents. Even the ones who were jerks to people were amazingly devoted to their chicks. They continue to take care of them after the hen is done with them, even into their "teen" times. They make my job easier by sending out warning calls and they always know if a hen is still out. They always let ladies dine first and will offer the tastiest morsels to the hens. Remember in most bird species the male bird takes on a significant role in the family.

If you can keep a good rooster, by all means do.
post #16 of 17

Hi everyone, i live in an area where we cannot keep Roosters as well, in San Diego. I'm looking in to the surgery but have not found a vet nearby who will do the surgery. One of my roos is two about 10 weeks old, and we're grown quite fond of him. If anyone can recommend someone who does the surgery, and is relatively close to Southern California, let me know. thanks!

post #17 of 17
You might want to look into nocrow collars.

Currently our chicken family consists of Bantam Blue Wheaten & Wheaten Ameracuna's, Bantam Welsummer, Bantam, Bantam Silver Laced Wyandotte, Bantam New Hampshires, millefleur D'unccle, a blue sizzle, white silkies, RIP Aggie. Stella and Becky our special needs hens. We have had backyard poultry for over 30 years We are a NPIP Certified flock NH15-226.

Reply

Currently our chicken family consists of Bantam Blue Wheaten & Wheaten Ameracuna's, Bantam Welsummer, Bantam, Bantam Silver Laced Wyandotte, Bantam New Hampshires, millefleur D'unccle, a blue sizzle, white silkies, RIP Aggie. Stella and Becky our special needs hens. We have had backyard poultry for over 30 years We are a NPIP Certified flock NH15-226.

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock