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Prolapse problem

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I have read through loads of threads on prolapse issues. We seem to have one with one of our girls, but has looked different than some of the others I have seen. I'm afraid we didn't catch it soon enough. sad.png I have a photo, so sorry it's nasty! I would love a second opinion from someone who has seen these before. We are first timers and want to do well with these beautiful birds.
Here's what we have done so far: a few 10 minute warm baths, trimmed the feathers away, washed everything off to the best of our ability, applied prep-h, another bath, applied sugar and honey. She has low appetite. We have separated her from the other 3. Small flock.
Thanks!
Edited by april23 - 5/11/15 at 6:06pm
post #2 of 7

Is she able to pass droppings? Can you feel inside her vent an inch or two with a rubber glove for a stuck egg? Her vent needs to be pushed back inside if you can get it to do that. If you can manage to push it in, then try to hold it there for a few minutes. The longer it stays out, the tissue can dry out and die. The dark area on the prolapse may need to be scrubbed off and debrided. Placing her in a dark cage or room for  16 hours a day, may help her to cease laying until she can heal.


Edited by Eggcessive - 5/11/15 at 8:24pm
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Yes she is able to pass droppings, however not normal size and she strains and makes a squeak like it hurts. It's oozing the white stuff. We did scrub off the black part believe it or not. The tissue underneath was dark too. Not the pink fleshy color I've seen everyone else's. sad.png we tried holding it in, but she just pushes it back out.
Is the egg supposed to come out the part hanging out or is that the poop hole?
Edited by april23 - 5/12/15 at 6:31am
post #4 of 7

The vent is the cloaca which is where the large intestine joins into the oviduct. There is a valve that keeps the intestine closed when the egg comes through. Her cloaca could be injured or dead  if it is dark. Many of these hens have to be put down, frankly because they keep prolapsing, or cannot heal. I would give it some time, and try to get her better though.

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Ok, that's what we were wondering. So in normal cases, it stays in when you put it back in? sad.png so sad. How long should we give it?
post #6 of 7

@april23   how is your hen.   Sorry I couldn't help but watching post to see if you get help and wishing her a recovery.:hugs

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions. big_smile.png 

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions. big_smile.png 

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply
post #7 of 7

I’m a novice, but what worked for us was soaking our bird, and gently taking the feces off. The chicken needs to be relaxed and not stimulated to strain at all. Here is the whole story:

Naomi, our beloved 6 month old leghorn, had a prolapsed vent. As a new chicken mama (mama of 8- 2 each-leghorn, australorp, rhode island red, ericana/Americana), I didn’t know what to do, so of course I took her to the vet and received the bad news that this was often the beginning of the end. I watched the vet clean off her bottom with the sprayer/faucet. The vet’s advice: keep her clean, warm, isolated and push the prolapse back in when it came out again and put sugar on the prolapse to reduce swelling. We did more and less than that. She took over our laundry room, so was isolated and warm; however, every time I cleaned her, she strained so hard that she would prolapse even further. I swear that she pushed her entire insides out by several inches. And when I pushed the prolapse back, she seemed to be hurt, even vomited once, and I kept forgetting the sugar. So, after feeling guilty for hurting her and balling at dinner (yes, I was balling over my girl), I gave up keeping her clean and gave up pushing the prolapse back. My husband and I were desperate. We were considering relocating her to the family farm to live out her days as a free range chicken, but we knew that had negatives as well, when my brilliant husband suggested a hot tub. No, not for us, but he wondered if soaking the poop off without stimulating her to push would be helpful, so we filled the kitchen sink with warm water and I added a little shampoo. I held her body under the water for a few minutes. I leaned over her so she wouldn’t be able to struggle and when I removed the feces, it peeled right off, easy peasy. Since my hand was on her bottom, I felt the vent go back inside. Naomi didn’t strain at all. I took her out of the sink and wrapped her in towels and held her for a while so she could dry (I liked the snuggling part too). Then I left her wrapped loosely in the towels, placed her back in the laundry room in a bin (with the lid off). In the morning, I found her right where I left her, but something was different: her bottom feathers were beginning to fluff out again, and best of all, no prolapse! No feces on her bottom and no prolapse! We released her later that day and she is now at the bottom of the pecking order, poor thing, but still, a month later, no prolapse. I believe she has only laid one egg since, which is great! We want her to heal and not lay eggs for a while.

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