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Maggots!!!! - Page 3

post #21 of 27
Chickens do not feel pain like humans do. I have operated on a crop bound cockerel with no anesthesia. He didn't move at all. I have stitched up both breasts and thighs of injured birds without anesthesia. Wrap a towel around a chicken, cover it's head and you will be amazed whatt they will hold still for.
Edited by enola - 6/9/15 at 8:48pm
post #22 of 27

I'm not going to argue with you about the various species of parasitic flies and their modus operandi when the information on them is readily available considering the abundance of public libraries in the USA. The best I can do for you is wikipedia on Myiasis, feel free to check their citations yourself. OP did not specify the species of fly and non-parasitic flies causing it is a rare occurrence. 

post #23 of 27
We don't want to argue either, but the vet did confirm for him the maggots were not from a parasitic fly species.
Edited by enola - 6/9/15 at 8:48pm
post #24 of 27

I think everyone just needs a hug :hugs

Living in rural Wisconsin with my better half, german shepherd, shetland sheepdog, buff orpingtons, black australorps, white leghorns, and one chubby cheeked Easter Egger.

~~~~“When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it ....” -Henry Ford


My coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-coop-that-had-to-match-the-house
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Living in rural Wisconsin with my better half, german shepherd, shetland sheepdog, buff orpingtons, black australorps, white leghorns, and one chubby cheeked Easter Egger.

~~~~“When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it ....” -Henry Ford


My coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-coop-that-had-to-match-the-house
Reply
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
I'm happy to report that the hen is doing much better today. She is still getting her treatment and remains isolated from the other hens. I have seen though that when she goes for a walk one of them tries to pick her butt!

@Briza you provided some great information that I will remember and keep an eye out for. Thanks for your feedback.

The new flooring was completed today and fresh new bedding laid out. I am researching automatic waterers and feeders then my coop should be ok.
post #26 of 27

Glad to hear things are going good so far :)

Living in rural Wisconsin with my better half, german shepherd, shetland sheepdog, buff orpingtons, black australorps, white leghorns, and one chubby cheeked Easter Egger.

~~~~“When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it ....” -Henry Ford


My coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-coop-that-had-to-match-the-house
Reply
Living in rural Wisconsin with my better half, german shepherd, shetland sheepdog, buff orpingtons, black australorps, white leghorns, and one chubby cheeked Easter Egger.

~~~~“When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it ....” -Henry Ford


My coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-coop-that-had-to-match-the-house
Reply
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BayBay Peepers View Post
 

I don't think ingesting them will cause harm, but they can cause other issues and headaches.  Personally I would clean out the coop and put down fresh bedding.  You don't want a full on infestation.

Every maggot that has been feeding on chicken manure that a hen eats is an open invitation to worms, internal parasites and other unhealthy things.  The maggots ingest the worm eggs found in the rotting chicken manure and when a hen eats the maggot the egg (or else a disease causing organism) is transferred to the hens' digestive track and the cycle is repeated.


Edited by chickengeorgeto - 2/22/16 at 6:19pm
Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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