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Favorite vegetable varities - Page 11

post #101 of 107
Great link...good information.
We always saved our fireplace ash for the garden when growing up. We would help scatter it over the garden before tilling or turning the rows.

Grandmother did not save ash from black walnut wood because grass doesn't grow well under those trees...said there was something in the tree that inhibited competition for nutrients.

She would save ash when she burned sticks and pine needles in a burn barrel and liked using pine needles as mulch.

We always composted too and leaves were always crushed and composted.
Edited by NanaKat - 2/13/16 at 5:26am

LF: Columbian Wyandotte, Cochins; B: OEGB, Rosecomb, d'Anvers, Delaware

"Speak kind words; hear kind echos."  "When you get to your wit's end, you'll find God lives there."  

"Speak when you are angry and you will make the best speech you will ever regret." 

Fabric Temptress - http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=3104712#p3104712
 

 

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LF: Columbian Wyandotte, Cochins; B: OEGB, Rosecomb, d'Anvers, Delaware

"Speak kind words; hear kind echos."  "When you get to your wit's end, you'll find God lives there."  

"Speak when you are angry and you will make the best speech you will ever regret." 

Fabric Temptress - http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=3104712#p3104712
 

 

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post #102 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaKat View Post

Great link...good information.
We always saved our fireplace ash for the garden when growing up. We would help scatter it over the garden before tilling or turning the rows.

Grandmother did not save ash from black walnut wood because grass doesn't grow well under those trees...said there was something in the tree that inhibited competition for nutrients.

She would save ash when she burned sticks and pine needles in a burn barrel and liked using pine needles as mulch.

We always composted too and leaves were always crushed and composted.
I think walnuts produce a poison to inhibit competition from other plants.
I have one turkey poult that's genetics are un identified
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I have one turkey poult that's genetics are un identified
Reply
post #103 of 107
Thread Starter 
It's called juglone
I have one turkey poult that's genetics are un identified
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I have one turkey poult that's genetics are un identified
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post #104 of 107

Wonder if it persists in the ash from Walnut????

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

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Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #105 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by copper2 View Post

Does anyone now of an organic high phosphorus fertilizer I could get? The garden has a deficiency in phosphorus.

 

I don't believe there is such a thing as a organic High Phosphorus fertilizer.

Most if not all organic fertilizers are low in N-P-K.

 

Wood Ash is between 4-10% Potassium, 2% Phosphorus, 25-50% Calcium, 1-3% magnesium and trace amounts of sulfur.

Don't let the high amount of Calcium concern you, according to Ohio State University (OSU) it will take twice the amount (by weight) of wood ash to do the same as lime.

 

If you need to raise the Phosphorus in your soil try Bone Meal, its 2-14-0 and contains about 24% Calcium.

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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post #106 of 107
Thread Starter 
I'm using bonemeal
I have one turkey poult that's genetics are un identified
Reply
I have one turkey poult that's genetics are un identified
Reply
post #107 of 107
I have a bunch of kale. They grow so easily and are delicious. My girls love kale too... although they do prefer tomatoes more. Then again, who can resist a perfect vibe ripen organic tomato?
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