15 French Guineas Straight Run!

  1. GlennLee
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    From keets to adults in 3 months, I sure have learned a lot about raising a flock of Guinea Fowl! What started out only as a means to reduce our tick and insect population has turned into an interesting adventure, similar to riding a roller coaster ride. There have been ups (I have trained them to return to the coop at the sound of a cow bell) and downs (an injured one die after nursing it for 10 days), a few bumps along the way (making new baby perches EVERY week because they outgrow them), times when my stomach bottomed out (finding the door to the run open in the morning with no birds inside), and times when I've let out a deep sigh (locating the flock just chillin' after the coop was empty). They provide constant entertainment, many laughs, a number of great photo ops, a reason to post on Facebook and have been a source of conversation and the beginning of new friendships.

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  1. Whittni
  2. GlennLee
    Thanks! Funny you should say that, because I don't consider myself a good photographer. I think the new phones help with that. I haven't found my Guineas to be exceptionally noisy, but I'll give you the parameters of our setting and you can decide for yourself. I'm a newbie and haven't had any previous experience with poultry, so I don't have anything to compare them to. My flock ranges on 10 acres and are out and about - away from the house most of the day. The volume of the flock when they do their warning call is loud, but it's not constant like the roosters across the road from us; the females can be constant with their two syllable "come back" call. I currently have 2/3 of the flock male and only 1/3 female, so that might help keep the noise level down, but it creates other issues - more competition for females. I'm in the process of adding a few more females to my flock - Pearls, not Jumbo French - there are a few subtle differences. At times I have to go search for them and usually find them in the tall grass or cattails and just stand and listen to their contentment - I LOVE listening to their little chirping, almost melodic cooing sounds. If they notice I'm out there watching them, they start to make a collective noise - not their warning sound, but it's almost like a bunch of kids who just got caught! They will come toward me in greeting, but usually stay about 2 feet away. Check out some of our postings on the Guinea Talk thread - there are members who have had Guineas longer than I have, and you'll get a good perspective on what it's like owning them or as someone else said, "being owned by them"! I hope you decide to try them out and let us know how it goes.
  3. mustangrooster
    Aw, They are very cute pics! Your a good photographer, The first and last pic are very good photos! I've heard that Guinea Fowl can be very noisy and a bit of a nuisance. Is this true? This article has just boosted my wanting to get Guineas, Hopefully I can find some around here!.
  4. GlennLee
    Thank you, Patti! It's fun sharing Guinea Fowl stories and everyone's support at BYC is greatly appreciated.
  5. pattyhen
    Congrats for winning this week's award. The pics are great and I love your story.
  6. GlennLee
    Thanks for your comment regarding the pics. I enjoy making of chronicle of my life with Guinea Fowl! They always give me a reason to laugh and smile. Yes, there is a difference between the French and "regular". The French were developed to be used as meat birds. Their coloring is most similar to the Pearls and they will weigh about one and a half to two pounds more than a "regular". I've noticed they don't fly like the others. We had one Pearl adult when we got the flock as keets and he would swoop up into the trees, go up on the roof and flew over our neighbor's house. The French Guineas seem to only hop and glide. I've even had to leave their baby perch in the coop for them to use to hop up to the first level of the roost at 3 1/2 feet. I just picked up a few more Pearls to try to even out the male to female ratio and they are flying with ease. Other than the size and flight, I don't think there are many differences. Our neighbors thought that their French Guineas preferred to stay closer to home than the others they have had. Since I've only had the flock of French, I don't have anything else to compare them to. They are always within a 1/2 mile radius and since we have 10 acres, they're on our property most of the time. If it's really hot, they will cross the road to get into our neighbor's woods. Thanks for the comment! I'm very happy with the French Guineas and would recommend them to people who are thinking about getting some.
  7. twisted-acres-farm
    is there a difference between French and "regular" guinea fowl ??? GREAT pics BTW

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