2nd attempt - chicken tractor deluxe

  1. Bissel
    Not long ago, I built my first coop for my first flock of chickens. It stated out as a way to creatively get rid of some old materials I had around the house and bloomed into a fun hobby. Information on my first coop can be found under the article title "Salvaged Coop - 4.25". Recently I was approached by someone wanting to know if I was interested in building a coop for a local auction to benefit the Parenting Center. I agreed because I was in-between projects and was looking for something fun to do and since all the materials would be donated all I had to do was concentrate on the build. First off, Im a novice wood worker and far from skilled so it did take me time to decide on a design and get it built. I have trouble designing a project in my head and on paper so I went to the local Lowes and bought a stack of 2"x2"x8' pressure treated boards for the frame. When I built my last "salvaged" coop I used 4"x4" posts and all 2"x4" boards for the build and quickly found out I couldn't move it out of my garage without help. It was just way to heavy which is why I decided to go with 2"x2"s this time around. With the exception of some 2"x4" boards around the base of the coop.

    I started by deciding how high the front and back would be, how big the nesting area would be and how long and wide the total coop would be. I then built the four sides and screwed them together. At this point I added supports, cross beams and other connectors. After learning the hard way, I used 1/4" hardware mesh for the floor and side walls. In my first coop I used a plywood floor and "chicken wire" for the wall. Needless to say, the plywood floor is full of poop and is disgusting. I also discovered that "chicken wire" is much to thin and tends to rust easily.

    On my first coop I used standard roofing like would be found on a home. This too was also a mistake as the shingles are way to heavy. While strolling around Lowes I found a product called Ondura which came in a 79"x48" size which was the perfect size and was only $20.99. The special nails were $10 so the total roof cost was a bit over $30. Not bad and it came in light gray, red and brown.

    I am attempting to put together a material list but I may not get around to it. In the meantime, I hope the attached pictures help someone looking to build a similar coop. Please feel free to contact me if you have any question.
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  1. Bissel
    It's designed to be moved around the yard. Which is why I made it lightweight and installed two eye-hooks in the front if you want to use a lawn tractor or golf cart to pull it around. You can get into it from the front door if necessary. You just have to step over a two foot wall.
  2. hosspak
    Very nice and WTG for doing a project to help others. I agree the 2x2's will make transport much easier. I have learned through BYC that many people are using linoleum for the flooring to make cleaning easier. You could keep a layer of hay and DE on your floor that way the girls will sweep it around by scratching and basically self clean, all you need to do is change it when it gets too nasty and I also heard this keeps the smell and the flies under control. Is your coop accessable for clean out underneath?

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