Articles from bibliophile birds

Step 1: The framing We started with an old hay wagon that we couldn't use because the axel wasn't street legal. We cut holes in the bed of it for the 4 corner posts, 4x4s that we salvaged from an old dog yard on the property. After adding a few 2x4s (left over from building the riding arena) for more support, my trusty handyman, Danny, put the roof up, in the Amish style, with 6x2s (also left over from the arena). He then framed in the front door, which had been stored in the shed for who...
Step 2: Putting up the tin We happened across a stash of 25 20ft tin roofing panels that were left over from when we reroofed the barn about 15 years ago. This allowed us to avoid needing to purchase plywood for the sides. We were so excited with this find that we didn't stop to think that we should put the sides up before the roof, so we had some last minute adjusting to do. We ended up needing to cut the side panels in half to slide them in. There is also a tin ridge vent covering the gap...
Step 3: The inside The inside of the coop is divide into 2 sections. These sections are seperated by the inner screen door and a wall of wire to allow ventilation. When the windows are open fresh air will blow through the entire coop. (We are waiting till Spring to cut panels into the bottom of the door that will be screened and closable as well.) The back 2/3s is for the hens. That section is 11x8ft. The door leads into it. We found some old grocery store shelves in one of the sheds that...
Step 4: Finishing the exterior We put cap pieces on the corners to cover the gaps where the panels meet. This will help keep more cold air out and gives it a nice finishing touch. In the first picture, you can see the yard gate attached to the corner. The gate slides up and down so it can be moved with the coop. You just slide it up, put a pin through a hole to hold it up, and go. Once in place, you simply drop it back down and it's secure! We also put a grill over the window so that, when...
Natural is Better Most chicken keepers realize the value of non-commercial poultry operations. Large numbers of birds kept in isolation or, conversely, packed by the hundreds into sheds, just doesn't make sense. Chickens need space and a few other chickens to call friend. We know, a natural lifestyle is better! Why, then, do so many people feed artificial, medicated commercial feed? Most commercial feeds just aren't good enough. I believe that natural, real foods are the only thing that...
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