Detroit Chicken Coop

I didn't grow up on a farm, I grew up in Ann Arbor and moved to Detroit in 2006.


The plan for my chicken coop was to have it contained inside my detached garage behind my house, with a run outside of the garage. This way I could build it for less money (since I would build into the corner) and it would be easy to maintain in the cold long Michigan winters.

Below are some very rough drawling of what I wanted my chicken coop to look like:

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I was able to find a bunch of 4 foot 2x4's for really cheap from a recycle reuse center. Originally I was planning on making the coop 4ft x4ft, but decided to opt for a larger coop of 6ft x 4ft. Since bigger is better ];)

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This is the location in the garage we plan on building the coop.

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Here is my Dear loving boyfriend helping me out since I was having some issues. ( I was using nails that were to short is what we figured out)

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Heres is the floor in the corner, with the flooring on it. The Flooring is that sticker type floor that comes in 12" by 12" squares, I was able to find some that was only 30 cents a square.

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We build the frame planning to use the two garage walls as part of it, I might try to do this some how differently if I were to do it all over again, since it was hard to attach these to the garage at first. I think it could have been easier with a little more planning.

As you can see we also raised the coop off of the ground, this will make it easier to clean, and off the cold cement. I plan on insulating the coop since Michigan has some cold winters.

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Nesting Box

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We ended up adding a window here instead to let in light, we also cut away that board blocking the window, I don't know why anyone would cover up a window like that.

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Chicken Pop Door


Originally I wanted to have a sliding door that opened from the inside, (like in Seachicks coop) but that seemed to be to hard...and complicated so we made this door instead. Which I love, the colors match out house.

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See it Matches!


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In 2009 we decided to make the run larger. The run is now 12 feet by 18 feet.



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We used a closet bar for one of the roost which you can see my boyfriend installing in the above picture

My loving boyfriend was nice enough to put on long pants and a long sleeve shirt in the hot heat and humidity of Michigan summer to put up insulation for the chicken coop. And then we put scrap left over 1/4 plywood over it.

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Putting in the finishing touches before the bedding goes down.

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This is the very first picture I took of the girls in their new coop, just hours after I brought them home.


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Things I Would Change

Even though I JUST finished my coop I can think of a few things I would be differently if I had to do it all over again:

1. I would make a formal plan, with sketches and measurements all drawn out. This would have saved us a few head aches.

2. I think I would have a guillotine style door since it would be easer to close and open form outside the coop, and could keep draft out better.

3. I would have planned for the Deep Litter method, making the door hight off the ground so pine shaving don't end up all over the run.


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New additions


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