Hot Weather Coop

  1. BigECarter
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    There are some wonderful coops on BYC - people decide that they want a backyard flock and one of the first things they do is design a coop. Some are budget, utilizing pallets and readily available/salvaged materials. Others are worthy of being on the cover of Southern Living magazine. But what I don't see a lot of are coops for hot and humid climates.

    Here on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, we get a month of winter, eight months of miserably hot and humid summers, and three months of fabulous spring/fall days. Most readily available chicken breeds I have researched at best tolerate the heat. The last thing that I think a chicken would want would be to be shut up in a confined coop just as the evening breezes are starting to feel good.

    Still to come...
    - picture of the spot we chose
    - size - 10'x12' + 3'x6' three-sided enclosure
    - posts, framing, hurricane clips - with pictures
    - how we chose the wire size - picture of the resident snake - also considerations of galvanized vs pvc coated, and gauge size

    In the meantime, I have just been informed that I have a poopy diaper to change.

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  1. Stumpy
    I am looking forward to seeing this. I am about one ag. zone further up than you are, so deal with heat more than cold.
  2. Weasleymum
    I can't wait to see it! We don't have it nearly as bad where I am in Central Virginia, but I am also in the planning stages for a coop that is as comfortable as possible year-round. It's much smaller than yours at 5'x10' (coop part being 5'x4', attached covered run adding another 6', with the coop elevated 2' so that underneath it is part of the run-- pretty common design here), sized for 5 birds.
    * I'm planning a convertible floor that will be wire in the summer and deep litter in the winter-- saw one like that here on BYC! I think that the heat created by the composting manure and wood shavings would be very uncomfortable in the summer heat-- with a wire floor that's two feet from the ground, air can flow through from underneath and through the windows.
    * The run will be roofed for shade, and the entire structure placed in the only shady part of our yard. The wall of the coop that faces in the shaded, roofed run will basically be one big window, with the protective glass totally removed in the summer months. The other two walls will have awning-style windows, for lots of ventilation. (Fourth wall is the one that faces away from the run, and will have the big access doors for clean-out.)
    *I'm planning the roof structure and general orientation of the coop to get the best combination of summer shade and winter sun-- we get a lot more winter here, I think, than Mississippi does...
    Anyway, I can't wait to see your coop, maybe glean some new ideas from it before we break ground!

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