Ozarks Coop

  1. mroger82
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    My winter project turned into a spring project, but finally completed my coop. It measures 9' X 6.5'. It stands 20" off the ground, has 5' walls and stands 9' at the roof peak. It technically is a tractor, but will only be moved seasonally for sun/shade as it weighs a ton. Our chicks free range and we have a flock of 13 pullets (12 weeks old as of this writing), and they love it.
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    The platform with one wall on top of it. More walls framed out laying up against the cedars.
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    Front view of coop with all wall up.
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    Side view.
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    Quarter view.
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    Nesting box framed out.
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    Front with nesting box.
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    Roof on and OSB board going on. Ladders for reference. 6' ladder in foreground and 9' ladder on right side. I went with a metal roof as it is easy to handle, apply, and maintain. It also provides better ventilation.
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    Side view with OSB.
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    Side view. You can see I left the ridge cap on the roof extended out. It provides more ventilation while keeping out the rain.
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    Other side with chicken door.
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    Front view of coop finished out with plywood siding. I also added a flower box between the windows.
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    Two 9' long staggered roosts. Plenty of room for our small flock.
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    Looking out of the front. Notice I have the nest boxes blocked off. They're not ready yet and I didn't want the girls to foul it up before it's ready. Expecting my first eggs in about 8 weeks...I hope.
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    A look under the eaves. Plenty of ventilation blocked with wire mesh to keep unwanted vermin out.
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    Looking at the ceiling. It's hard to see, but there is a nice gap for the air to get out through the ridge cap.

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  1. highcountrybell
  2. featherweightmn
    The design is really nice -love the color!!
  3. mroger82
    You know, when I was first planning this project, I said to myself "I'm going to keep all of my receipts and know exactly what I have spent." Well, sorry to say that plan fell be the whey side. After a couple of trips to Lowes and back (there were many trips) and some lost receipts, I just didn't keep up with costs. It became more of a labor of love so-to-speak. It wasn't cheap by any means. So while I don't have any hard numbers for you, I can say you're looking at around $1000. It's amazing how much you can spend on hardware alone. I wish I could go back and see exactly what we spent, but I knew the design I had planned, knew what materials I wanted to use, and was going to build it to those specs. It just became where it really wasn't that important to me to know the dollar amounts. I didn't go extravagant at all and cut corners where I could. For example the trim is furring strips, plywood sheet siding. metal roofing, etc. I could have made it much cheaper just by making a conventional dimensioned design. For example it is 9 feet wide. I had to buy 10 foot lumber and cut it, instead of using 8 foot lumber. Also had to buy extra sheets of OSB and siding because they come in 4 ft widths. That's just amateur carpentry design/planning on my part.
  4. teneyck farms
    i like your coop any idea what the cost was im thinking of building one simliar but im on a tight budget
  5. buffchicks
    This came out great! I bet your chickens are very happy.

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